A Fomo-ers guide to the Venice Biennale

The Captain Lied at Fondazione Prada. This is part of an ongoing project looking at planetary atmospheric circulation, which she is doing as part of her residency at UCD’s Parity Studios. I wanted to take home Winston Chmielinski’s Melting As A Model, That’s All, a meticulously embroidered, deconstructed quilt of flags from the 12 original signatories to the Antarctic Treaty. A transmedia exhibition project, the result of an ongoing, in-depth exchange between writer and film-maker Alexander Kluge, artist Thomas Demand, stage and costume designer Anna Viebrock and curator Udo Kittelmann. Future Generation Art Prize at Venice 2017 The Future Generation Art Prize is an international award for artists up to 35 years of age, and its group show features 21 young artists. The results are outstanding and mesmerising from start to finish. The piece centres on a Pinocchio-esque figure who rises from a deprived social status to the heights of power by constantly lying. The images bear a striking resemblance to atmospheric phenomena seen at a macro scale on Earth. And the ones I missed… The project’s creator, who will be present during the seven months of the Biennale, hopes the pavilion will become a living, breathing space rather than a passive receptacle for predetermined programmes. The French Pavilion, Xavier Veilhan, Studio Venezia This show was curated by the historian and critic Lionel Bovier and one of my favourite visual artists and composers Christian Marclay. Scottish Pavilion, Rachel Maclean, Spite Your Face I missed this at the pavilion and was suffering the post-fomo stress so much I wrote to the artist on my way home. No matter how much you see or do you know you’re missing something else worth seeing or doing. Even five Biennale’s later I haven’t cracked the best way to do it. Included are Irish artist Méadhbh O’Connor and Drop Everything 2016 participant Banrei (Jake Harper). You can see a film on it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9k7PAcKEMLg. I spend my life trying to eliminate the fear of missing out (Fomo) but at the Venice Biennale it’s impossible to avoid. Danz is one of three Irish women showing at the Biennale, and the only Irish artist of the 120 invited artists for the 57th International Art Exhibition Viva Arte Viva, which is curated by Christine Macel. Terrifying and all too close to the bone. Rachel Maclean for Scotland; I had serious rage I missed this in situ, but again …

Awkward, odd and disturbing sex remains a distraction at Cannes

Well, the films that play in competition here tend to observe the pessimistic template that has governed most cultural cinema since the term meant anything. Jake Gyllenhaal forces the titular creature, genetically modified to the size of a minibus, into congress with a less kind specimen in a scene that, to force home the horror, is repeated endlessly in video clips. You are bad people. They have good sex. It’s also easier to do bad sex convincingly on film than its merrier, sheet-clutching, candle-lit alternative. Thank heavens for 120 Beats per Second. We’ve barely hit our stride and already the beasts are making two backs in many and various ways. You will have horrible sex. Your good sex is actually bad sex. Moss eventually wins the five-metre condom pull, but to what end it is not entirely clear. The most disturbing sex scene so far is, however, that between an enormous, genetically modified pig and her brutal thoughtless mate in Bong Joon-Ho’s Okja. Robin Campillo’s highly praised film, a study of Aids activism in 1990s France, actually manages the tricky business of communicating its characters affection through the sexual act. The two fall into an inexplicable fight over the used condom that ends with them pulling hopelessly on either end as if committed to making a sport of the activity. The warring couple at the film’s heart have it away with their respective lovers while their son sinks into misery before disappearing towards the Moscow outlands. The urbane Claes Bang, a solipsistic curator, and the inquisitive Elisabeth Moss, a US reporter, seem to be enjoying what they’re up to, but the odd smirk on Moss’s face suggests she may be distracted. You are a defenceless animal. Be ashamed. Even that tragedy can’t stop them from curling up in lush rooms not quite illuminated by sickly grey light. This is yet another argument for the awfulness of the sexual act. Intimacies are shrouded in shadow. Rare is the film in the Official Selection that doesn’t have some sort of messy coupling. There is some coyness to the scenes featuring Nahuel Perez Biscayart and Arnaud Valois. But this is unquestionably a positive experience. You don’t find much joy in the movies of Ingmar Bergman. For once in cinema, sex offers some release and distraction from misery. 120 Beats Per Minute review: unofficial early Cannes favourite The Meyerowitz Stories Review: A welcome addition …

Five shortlisted artists for RCSI Art Award announced

The five shortlisted artists for this year’s RCSI Art Award have been announced at a ceremony at the RHA in Dublin. His resulting commission, Atlas and Axis, was recently unveiled at the York Street campus of the RCSI. The inaugural winner was Remco de Fouw for his work Random Access Memory V. Shortlistlisted for the RCSI Art Award, Varnishing Day, at the RHA.Miranda Blennerhassett, RHA Site specific installationPhoto Kenneth O Halloran Shortlistlisted for the RCSI Art Award, Varnishing Day, at the RHA.Abigail O’Brien, Guess Who’s Coming to DinnerPhoto Kenneth O Halloran Shortlistlisted for the RCSI Art Award, Varnishing Day, at the RHA.Kathy Prendergast, Fuji and Fujidelic.Photo Kenneth O Halloran Shortlistlisted for the RCSI Art Award, Varnishing Day, at the RHA.Eilis O’Connell Angular Momentum, bronze sculpture.Photo Kenneth O Halloran The shortlist was announced at Varnishing Day, which marks the opening of this year’s RHA Annual Exhibition. The nominated works are: RHA Site Specific Installation by Miranda Blennerhassett; Vinyl Factory by Colin Martin; Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, No 2 by Abigail O’Brien; Angular Momentum by Eilis O’Connell; and Fuji and Fujidelic by Kathy Prendergast. The Irish Times is a partner in the competition. The winner receives €5,000, the RCSI silver medal and a commission to the value of €10,000 for the RCSI collection, and will be announced in June. The RCSI Art Award is a celebration of the association between art, medicine and wellbeing and the common heritage of the RCSI and RHA. All works of art selected for the RHA Annual Exhibition in any medium are considered for the RCSI Art Award. This year’s award committee includes Prof John Hyland, president of the RCSI; Mick O’Dea, president of the RHA; Patrick T Murphy, director of the RHA; Prof Clive Lee, professor of anatomy at the RCSI and RHA; Dr Abdul Bulbulia, the founder of Waterford Healing Arts; Jane Butler, communications officer at the RCSI; and this writer.

Donal Dineen’s Sunken Treasure: Andy the Doorbum – ‘The Fool’

When it does, it’s glorious, with crescendos the size of the North Carolina hills he hails from. There’s a menace and magic to it in almost equal parts. His stage persona features an eerie concoction of grim-reaper garb and ghoulish masks. It begins in darkness and gradually gets brighter as the the silicon bicycle lights which adorn every finger alight. Beautiful codas trail off like drifting northern lights. The shadow play accentuates the mysterious song themes as he twists and turns out one spooky contortions after another, all the while howling like Tom Waits on 80 cigarettes a day. I love it when people take their ideas to the limits onstage, then sip water and chat sidestage as if nothing happened. Along with guts, Andy has many gifts behind the guises. It’s a simple idea that works a treat. A reverberating growling snarl is his opening salvo. I don’t know why I doubted him. From listening to all of the records previous to The Fool, I could have been persuaded that no such human could trash the world and its foibles with such ardent feoricity and yet also fit in and live happily in it. Welcome to the show. Succumbing to the darkness is his way of confronting it, doggedly sticking to the task of finding cracks and then building beautiful moments from these chinks of light. And the light breaks through in every song. The Fool sees him enter a brave new sonic world and it’s as transformative as it is terrifying. But he slipped from raging heart-on-fire performer to regular human with great ease last week. Here it’s at its most twisted and beguiling. Andy is no ordinary cat. All nonchalant like. And soon it’s dark again. I write this review with the benefit of actually having recently laid eyes on the elusive legend that is the man/magician/musican Andy The Doorbum. Seeing is usually believing, but in this case, there’s a whole lot of disbelieving involved too. It must have slipped my mind the fact that anything is possible and art and music will never run out of ways of intertwining into new formations in their endless dance together.

Read the Africa Day 2017 writing competition winners

I watch her and think for a moment about how time can move at a hundred miles an hour and stand still, all at once. I walk to the place where the coils of barbed wire atop the gate scrape the clouds. She’s practising her cursive. She’s gone already. True to the Nigerian spirit, we just get on with it – but like any good passionate person in a traffic jam, we can get angry! In quote from a friend ‘night life depends on family background, location and the specific day’. I open the door of the bedside locker and move aside the stack of books until I can reach in and take out the contraband. We lived in different worlds.  Jimmy Omukuba is a 13-year-old Kenyan primary school pupil from the village of Shirali in Kakamega County. He is in standard eight and will be sitting for his Kenya Certificate of Primary Education examinations this November to join secondary school next January. He goes to school at Munyanza Primary School in the neighbouring village of Ebulakayi. My cousin laughed and stated ‘yes, they will know you are not from this place!’. No.” He looks hurt, so I force a friendliness over my face. The drugs have quietened him. This feeling was very much the feeling of being at home. My bodyguard cousin wisely only brought me onto the danfo once or twice. We saw people selling ‘ suya’- roasted corn – and many other foods that I still don’t know the name of. I turn to the girl. There were odd days when one would feel quite African and would dress as so. Highly commended were (adults) Etienne Muller, Deirdre Toomey, Patricia O’Connor and Mary Sorohan; (Secondary) Anna Maya Pawlowski, Hazel Kelvin, David Garvey, Michael Dake; and (Primary) Lara Ekaldi, Reme Otuos, Caroline Wall and Lucy Maxwell Guinan. English is communicated in different ways. I finally got to see it for myself! It helped me to see the cultural aspect, which was amazing. There are a lot of markets in Nigeria. Oh! Whenever we passed the food and fresh fish stalls there was a funny smell that could throw one off, but I didn’t mind. To give you an idea of what they do: Imagine this in Dublin: no bus stops, no indication of where you are, except someone holding onto the handrail screaming: “CLAREHALL, CLAREHALL, CLAREHALL!”, Just so you’d know where you’re …

Prince’s siblings are named heirs to his vast estate

He left behind some $25 million (about €22 million) in properties alone, according to an inventory compiled after his death by an asset management company. The six-song EP Deliverance had been scheduled to be released on the first anniversary of Prince’s death. Paisley Park now operates as a museum, with displays of Prince’s flamboyant concert wardrobe as well as his instruments and motorcycle collection. Bono: ‘I don’t want to meet Donald Trump’ ‘Cosmo’ brings the spirit of New York’s legendary Loft to Dublin Una Mullally: National Concert Hall showing the way for other venues The exact value of Prince’s estate is unclear, but believed to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Reuters It would have marked the first in a series of planned posthumous releases of material by Prince from the huge vault of discarded or unfinished material he reportedly left behind. If an appellate court rules that rejected claimants could have a claim, the judge said he would consider them, court documents said. New music Last month, a US judge blocked a planned release of new Prince music. A Minnesota judge has ruled that six siblings of Prince are the heirs to his vast estate, more than a year after the musician’s death from an accidental drug overdose, according to court documents released on Friday. The creator of hits such as Purple Rain and When Doves Cry did not leave behind a will, sparking a protracted legal battle over his estate, with dozens of people filing claims of heirship. Prince died in April 2016 at age 57 of an accidental, self-administered overdose of the powerful painkiller fentanyl at his Paisley Park Studios compound in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen. Prince’s assets will not be distributed to his heirs without a formal court order. Prince’s sister Tyka Nelson, and his half-siblings Omarr Baker, Alfred Jackson, Sharon Nelson, Norrine Nelson and John Nelson, were designated as the musician’s heirs by Carver County district judge Kevin Eide.

Local history: Ireland’s Post Office, Belfast’s architectural heritage and an ancient graveyard in Birr

.” or “Pray for the soul of.. Rare engravings, paintings and early photographs are among the range of illustrations. St Brendan’s remains a place of geographical, social and sacred history, a physical link between the town and the past when Birr was called Parsonstown. The authors have recorded, photographed and tabulated the memorials and decorative emblems of faith. The service operated all over the country and was severed when the last TPO was withdrawn in 1994. Delicately carved gravestone artwork includes spirals, rosettes, winged heads, three-leafed clover, and hourglasses representing the passage of time. Its absorbing story is recounted in A History of St George’s Church Belfast (Ulster Historical Foundation, £19.99) by Brian Walker. The firm designed numerous structures in Belfast such as the Ocean Buildings, Scottish Provident, and the Presbyterian Assembly Buildings, as well as the much-missed department stores Robinson & Cleaver, and Anderson & McAuley whose buildings have been repurposed. An impressive two-page photographic spread features 40 well-attired gentlemen, ladies and junior members of the venerable Belfast Naturalists’ Field Club enjoying an outing to the church in 1929. Another large tome, lavishly illustrated with 600 colour images, is Architects of Ulster: Young & MacKenzie, A Transformational Provincial Practice, 1850-1960 (Ulster Architectural Heritage Society, £28) by Paul Harron, an architectural historian. Few institutions in Ireland can claim such an influential pedigree as the Post Office, whose 300-year history is inextricably linked to the changing face of Irish life. St Brendan’s is a pre-Reformation church, and burial plots are at least 800 years old but only 156 memorials, mostly from the early 18th to the late 19th century, are legible. This handsomely illustrated hardback ensures that the religious and folk art of its talented craftsmen will not be forgotten. He documents the work of a vibrant firm formed in the early 1850s which survived for three generations and popularised Gothic Revivalism for Presbyterians. The church has played an important role in the spiritual and cultural development of the city and has survived many physical threats of destruction including the 1941 Blitz in the second World War. Robert Young was the founder and became an Irish Privy councillor; his son, Robert Magill Young, who was born in Athlone, was a historian. Due to overcrowding, the graveyard closed to new burials in 1879, by which stage geese and lambs were grazing in the grounds. The authors also explain the use of rubric, …

Murderous women having a moment in new crime thrillers

One Bad Turn (Quercus, £12.99) is the third in Sinéad Crowley’s compulsively readable Claire Boyle series. Lizzie Borden might be the archetypal transgressive female, and Sarah Schmidt has taken the 81 whacks and the parents that were dealt them and spun a mesmerising reimagining of it all in See What I Have Done (Tinder Press, £12.99). It opens with the kidnapping of Leah, an unhappy teenage girl, closely followed by an armed siege in the doctor’s surgery DS Boyle happens to be attending with her baby daughter. With Rob’s help, Anne gradually begins to recover disturbing memories from the first six missing years of her life, when her mother was still alive and may herself have lived in the house. We’re not in St Mary Mead any more. Schmidt writes with precision and flair about the oppressive boredom of domesticity, the twisted intensity of sisterly love and the forlorn dreams of leaving and of personal reinvention Emma and Lizzie share. Almost worth getting dolled up for.” Rhiannon Lewis has just dispatched a random sexual attacker into the canal, minus his erect penis, which she has severed with a steak knife and packed in one of her dog’s poo bags so it can later play a significant part in the plot. And while she has just made the shortlist for TV’s Women of the Century, mostly she lives a normal life these days: working as an editorial assistant, getting engaged to her unfaithful boyfriend, helping to plan her friend’s wedding, getting pregnant, and getting away with murder. Flashing back and forth in time, the mystery unfolds at a blistering pace, leading ultimately to an unexpected and devastatingly dark conclusion. The doctor, Heather Gilmore, and the hostage taker, Eileen Delaney, were childhood friends, and it emerges that Eileen, who has had a hand in Leah’s seizing, blames Heather for the death of her son. Emma – by Nigella out of Gwyneth – is the queen of lifestyle and self-help, while her husband Rob psychoanalyses celebrities on the radio. In The Housekeeper (Simon & Schuster, £8.99), by the mellifluously named Suellen Dainty, Anne Morgan has broken up with her Marco Pierre White-style chef boyfriend and gone to keep house for Emma Helmsley and her family. The catastrophic consequences of the economic collapse are deftly dramatised, while Boyle’s less-than-tranquil relationship with her stay-at-home husband is finely drawn. When Rhiannon was six, she was the …

‘Twin Peaks’ reboot sees a new generation discover an old evil

Lynch once described Twin Peaks not as a place, but a condition. He is terrifying both as an image – Frank Silva’s face, his animalistic movements, and his unhinged power are all incredibly disquieting – and as an idea. Whether the new series holds up to the original run is basically unimportant: it might take 10 or 20 years to know for sure. Twin Peaks is a remote town in the pacific northwest of the United States, a wholesome, straight-shooting place on the Canadian border, surrounded by tall Douglas fir trees. Owl-eyed fans are invited to turn over every bit of information, every image, every hint of a clue in the hopes of unlocking something like a coherent meaning. It takes those two words and puts them together as a psychoanalyst would: poking at them, turning them over, seeing what lies beneath. Sky signs deal with CBS for Showtime rights Twin career peaks Sing a song of suspense: the wild music close to David Lynch’s heart What America demands, like any dream, is interpretation and everything in Twin Peaks is open to that. Justice, in the purest sense, is his goal. If you were looking for the roots of The Sopranos, you might find a hint of that complexity right here in Twin Peaks. The scant previews we’ve seen suggest a new generation discovering an old evil for themselves; the journeys of these characters, rather than the familiar faces, will likely determine the success of the series. A 1968 Datsun pickup, powder blue, or the roar of a Harley beneath a solitary traffic light on a moonless midnight road. This is the question that animates Twin Peaks, David Lynch and Mark Frost’s game-changing TV series from 1990. It turns out Twin Peaks is a town with a lot to hide. It isn’t just that the answer isn’t revealed; it’s that the show genuinely has no answer. The United States as it imagines itself, the mythos from which it draws the glue that holds the whole crazy apparatus together. Lynch and Frost turned a simple murder mystery into a surreal and poetic examination of American popular culture and, in doing so, provided a blueprint for the open-ended, character-driven, big-budget television dramas that would follow in its wake. The person leading the investigation is FBI agent Dale Cooper, played by Kyle MacLachlan. It’s as good a description as any for the horror …

In a Word . . . Fraud

Anyone who spells Aleppo with a lower case ‘a’ or drops an ‘e’ from believed simply cannot be trusted. This money is belived to be part of the funds embezzled by the syrian authority or fleeing rebels from that region. I am contacting you based on the confidence which i have seen in you. Yours Faithfully Major Mike Moore.” To which I responded: “Dear Major Mike, I couldn’t possibly take up your kind offer until you improve both your English and grammar. I need your consent over this very important and confidential issue. Only what is required now is your full Name and Telephone number I wait for your urgent response to provide you with further details. Sincerely…” Fraud, from Old French fraude, from Latin fraus, meaning deception inaword@irishtimes.com I have concluded with an elite troops who have agreed to help cross the box to turkey and thereby deposit the box to a security company there as containing a very important files. I need your help in confidence to help me secure this funds in your custody and open a bank account to deposit the funds in your country, then once my service is completed here in the next 3 years, I would relocate to your country to meet you in person and share the funds 70-30% each. I recently received this email. When you do I will review the situation. Few days ago, I have confirmed that the elite troops has deposited the box successfully at security firm in Ankara in the name of a general named Ahmet Mereket. “My name is Major Mike Moore, 34 years old from Alabama, a US army currently stationed in Syria for war against terrorism. Few weeks ago, while curbing a village in allepo of terrorist hideouts, I and my fellow colleague found a metal sealed box containing a huge amount in the value of $14,600.000.00 USD. Thank you. Thank you. and let me know if you can travel to Turkey cambodia Spain or Germany to receive the box cause following my discussion with the delivering company in Turkey there diplomat has only four root for now so let me know which of the countries will be okay for you to receive the box. As army generals, the security company would not question the real contents of the box considering their positions as security personels.

‘Concert’ at Dublin dance Festival: warm, funny, respectful and irreverent

A recorded interview with Potts is spliced to set up a witty real-time conversation with Dunne. The conversation is warm, funny, respectful and at times irreverent. Concert isn’t a pitched battle of dancer versus musician, rather a dialogue with Potts as artist to artist. He deftly switches between normal steps and stylised dance steps, playing with expectations. As well an LP of The Liffey Banks, a soundscore has been created by Mel Mercier that adds texture to the solo violin. Dunne’s dancing is similarly muted, even in hard shoes, eyes cast downwards in concentration as he listens intently and reacts to microscopic changes in rhythm. Ultimately, both are kindred spirits, in love with their artforms but dismissive of the rules. Turntable and tape recorder Eschewing the theatre’s sound system, the music comes from two moveable speakers onstage, a turntable and a tape recorder, creating an intimate dialogue. Concert opens with Dunne in sneakers stepping from one foot to the other, simply outlining his own credo on rhythm and steps and how every dance comes from the simple act of stepping. Dancer Colin Dunne has accepted this challenge, not to earn a badge of honour like those reserved for ballet choreographers tackling Stravinsky’s Sacre du Printemps, but to gain a fuller understanding of his own craft. Concert runs until Saturday May 20th. Looping patterns As Concert finishes, Dunne records looping patterns of foot taps, leg swings, violin notes and piano chords. Tommy Potts’s solo fiddle playing was highly idiosyncratic, and the irregular phrasing and wayward pulse in his album The Liffey Banks earned it notoriety: musicians were in thrall to its singular genius, dancers dismayed that it was undanceable. Later, seated at a piano, he plays the hornpipe Blackbird, then tries to mimic Pott’s performance – an illustrative, but impossible task. However artificial, it suggests the admiration and respect would have been reciprocal. Together they build into a rich tapestry, but each individual gesture seems like a message into the spiritual world that Potts now inhabits. See dublindancefestival.ie

OPW gets permission for Leinster House refurbishment

Conservation architect Heritage body An Taisce had raised concerns about the fire escape and access corridor provisions in the application. While a final cost for the work has yet to be determined, the OPW last December said it would be at least €8 million. The council has recommended that a conservation architect be employed to manage, monitor and implement the works on site “and to ensure adequate protection of the historic fabric during the works”. The conservation and restoration work to the 1745 Leinster House building would include rewiring, structural strengthening and fire-compartmentation works, repairs to internal joinery, plasterwork and floors, some internal reconfiguration and redecoration throughout. However, the discovery late last year of a “secret door” directly connecting Leinster House to the museum, which had been boarded up in the 1920s, has meant this level of intervention will not be necessary. The proposal to relocate the Seanad to the museum had previously involved cutting through the walls of the building to create entrances and the attachment of a lift to the facade of the museum. The proposal to relocate the Senators during the works caused controversy last year when it was publicly criticised by a former director of the museum, Pat Wallace, who said staff were “weeping” at the prospect. Plans for the refurbishment of Leinster House, and the temporary relocation of the Seanad to the neighbouring National Museum of Ireland–Archaeology, have been approved by Dublin City Council. The Office of Public Works made two separate planning applications, one for the internal and external restoration of the Georgian building, and a second to permit the use of the museum for Seanad sittings during the work, which is expected to continue until the end of next year. External work will also be undertaken, including modifications to ramps and paving to improve accessibility, stone repair and cleaning works to elevations, and roof repairs. The OPW said all works would be reversed and removed on completion of the conservation and restoration of Leinster House.

Jean-Michel Basquiat artwork sets new auction record

Sotheby’s said the sale of Untitled in Manhattan was an auction record for the artist. The auction house said it had remained in the same private collection since it was bought at auction in 1984 for $19,000. An artwork by Jean-Michel Basquiat has sold for a record $110.5 million (about €99 million) at an auction in New York. AP Basquiat died of a drug overdose in 1988 at age 27. The piece was purchased by noted Japanese collector and entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa, after a 10-minute bidding war. The previous auction record for a Basquiat work was set last May when Untitled, 1982 sold for $57.3 million, also to Maezawa. The 1982 painting depicts a face in the shape of a skull. It also set a record price for an American artist at auction. Anthrax, bombs and cancer We are working with Aosdána on reforms that will benefit artists “When I saw this painting, I was struck with so much excitement and gratitude for my love of art,” said Maezawa, who plans to display it in his museum in Chiba, Japan, after loaning it to institutions and exhibitions across the world. RCSI Art Award unveils its first sculpture What’s hidden in the landscape? Untitled was virtually unknown before it was unveiled at Sotheby’s weeks ago.

Cannes festival, day three: Let the booing commence

Catcalls descended from the upper balcony. She also confirmed that most coproduction treaties are organised under the umbrella of the Council of Europe and, thus, should survive the divorce from the EU. The bovine noises before Bong Joon-ho’s Okja were not unexpected. Giant pigs The film was ultimately very well received. “What happened this morning, I’m happy about it,” he laughed. We came to show the film to Cannes.” Bong professed himself untroubled by Almodóvar’s comments. “It’s a statement the president made and he is entitled to make any statement,” she said coolly, before twisting the knife a bit. This will be good news for the many Irish producers who work alongside British colleagues. Yet the festival had failed to show Okja as the film-makers intended. “The UK is involved in many films where borders are crossed very frequently,” Davis said. (While we waited for the film to restart, an Italian journalist joked that perhaps Netflix were going to show it to us on our phones.) Secondly, by restarting the film, the organisers gave the herd a second chance to boo Netflix. What happened next might, to the unobservant attendee, have sounded like a full-scale art riot. “This incident is completely due to the technical staff of the festival, who deeply apologise to the director and his team, to the producers as well as to the audience,” it read. “I’m just happy he will watch this movie tonight,” he said. This they did, to a few responding cheers. There was shouting from the depths. At the press conference following the screening, Bong was asked about nonsensical rumours the technical problems were a result of sabotage. Grumpy chatter concerning the inclusion of films from Netflix – producers of that Korean ecological fantasy – have been brewing for weeks and, sure enough, when the company’s logo appeared there was an outbreak of disgruntled emanations. I’m fine.” Elsewhere in Cannes, British film officials were working hard to calm nervousness about the fallout from Brexit. Cannes would not be Cannes without booing. “He can say anything. A serious, effects-heavy comedy starring Tilda Swinton as the evil head of a conglomerate that produces giant pigs, Okja says things worth hearing the state of the planet. The organisers changed the rules for admission when it transpired that Netflix was not going to show either of its competition entries in French cinemas. It transpired that the top …

House of Cards returns to real-life competition

So you could say Pride and Prejudice is 19th-century property porn. Garden enthusiasts will be flocking to the Phoenix Park over the June bank holiday weekend for the annual Bloom festival, and Aine Lawlor and Marty Morrissey will be there on opening day to present Bloom Live & Super Garden Final (Thursday, RTÉ One, 5.10pm, 7pm and 8.30pm). But we’re still looking forward to some quality Capitol Hill drama, when House of Cards (Netflix, from Tuesday) returns for a fifth series of pernicious presidential shenanigans. Katy Perry And Much More: Radio 1’s Big Weekend Highlights (Monday, BBC One, 11.30pm) rounds up the fun and frolics of this year’s bash at Hull, with sets from the Chained to the Rhythm singer, Kings of Leon, Kasabian, Lorde, Clean Bandit, Rag N Bone Man, Little Mix and much much more. “I don’t know what we’re going to do, seriously.” There’s nothing else to do but sit back and enjoy the new series of HoC, with Kevin Spacey as corrupt Democratic president Frank J Underwood, who will stop at nothing to stay in power, and Wright as his conniving first lady, who’s more Lady Macbeth than Michelle Obama. Following the hostage standoff with Islamic terrorist organisation ICO, the Underwoods decide to base their campaign on fear, and Frank reveals his true ambition is to be president-for-life. The daily goings-on in the White House are like a bad soap opera – or a horror movie – so any political drama is likely to pale before the real-life plot twists and script deviations that define the Trump presidency. Marty is more used to being at Croke Park – his natural habitat – but he’ll be temporarily uprooted and moved to the Phoenix Park to co-present three special opening day programmes to celebrate this hugely popular event. At 5.10pm, Aine and Marty meet the designers who have created this year’s showgardens, which we’re sure will be stunning as usual. What does RTÉ do with all our licence money? “One nation – Underwood,” he says ominously. The Coen brothers’ Fargo is one movie that’s found a whole new life as a TV series, and fans of this darkly comic drama will be eagerly awaiting season three of Fargo (Wednesday, Channel 4, 10pm). So, what fresh outrages have Frank and Claire in store for season five? Elizabeth Moss plays Offred, one of the few fertile women in a society …

Concert at the Dublin Dance Festival: warm, funny, respectful and irreverent

Concert runs until Saturday May 20th. A recorded interview with Potts is spliced to set up a witty real-time conversation with Dunne. As well an LP of The Liffey Banks, a soundscore has been created by Mel Mercier that adds texture to the solo violin. Dancer Colin Dunne has accepted this challenge, not to earn a badge of honour like those reserved for ballet choreographers tackling Stravinsky’s Sacre du Printemps, but to gain a fuller understanding of his own craft. However artificial, it suggests the admiration and respect would have been reciprocal. The conversation is warm, funny, respectful and at times irreverent. Concert ★★★★★ Project Arts Centre, Dublin Tommy Potts’ solo fiddle playing was highly idiosyncratic, and the irregular phrasing and wayward pulse in his album The Liffey Banks earned it notoriety: musicians were in thrall to its singular genius, dancers dismayed that it was undanceable. Later seated at a piano, he plays the hornpipe Blackbird, then tries to mimic Pott’s performance – an illustrative, but impossible task. Dunne’s dancing is similarly muted, even in hard shoes, eyes cast downwards in concentration as he listens intently and reacts to microscopic changes in rhythm. Ultimately both are kindred spirits, in love with their artforms but dismissive of the rules. Concert isn’t a pitched battle of dancer versus musician, rather a dialogue with Potts as artist to artist. Concert opens with Dunne in sneakers stepping from one foot to the other, simply outlining his own credo on rhythm and steps and how every dance comes from the simple act of stepping. See dublindancefestival.ie Together they build into a rich tapestry, but each individual gesture seems like a message into the spiritual world that Potts now inhabits. He deftly switches between normal steps and stylised dance steps, playing with expectations. Eschewing the theatre’s sound system, the music comes from two moveable speakers onstage, a turntable and a tape recorder, creating an intimate dialogue. As Concert finishes, Dunne records looping patterns of foot taps, leg swings, violin notes and piano chords.

Second book syndrome: ‘You don’t wait for inspiration, you create it’

I was lucky because my publisher wanted a sequel to the first book, so in many ways the core components were already there: voice and character. It is a boost in an otherwise bogged-down-in-insecurity writerly life. Okay, not really, but family and friends certainly took a back seat as I scrambled for words – any words – hoping that they’d somehow make a semi-decent story. It’s so rare that I wonder whether the whole idea is one big fallacy, created by one writer who was having a bit of a time of it, to make other writers who were also having a bit of a time of it, feel better. And then came the inevitable pain of delivery. Then there were the intermittent bursts of joy at getting a chance to create something again; the odd sub-plot that wove in perfectly with the main one; that one clever line I’m not sure which part of my brain managed to dredge up. Skip past the arduous task of redrafting (a million times, because you’re not as clever as you thought you were) and one day you get the ever-anticipated email, telling you that a publisher has made an offer. Surely the only real inspiration to write is to unpick people and reveal human realities via the characters you create. I had a deadline, but no story. The second, however, is almost an accident – the one you have by default because you had the first one. My publication day came and went and there were the sought-after reviews, from magazines to broadsheets. Then I had to face the thing I was going to worry about later, because later was upon me. in Q&A sessions. That’s because no one tells you that inspiration is pure luck. Being emailed by an agent to say that they want to represent you, even when they’ve only read a hundred pages of your book, is a good feeling. I’ll caveat all of this by saying I wouldn’t have it any other way – except maybe more than a year to write a book. You don’t wait for inspiration, you create it. I don’t know why people are still allowed to ask: what inspired you? Not only that, but your book will be a lead title. I might not have got morning sickness, but there was usually some kind of nausea involved. Except life isn’t like a …

Winston Churchill sent the Black and Tans to Palestine

One briefing document apparently written for the British Army pointed to how many members of the Churchill-initiated gendarmerie had formerly been based in Ireland. Sometimes a fragment reveals more than a tome. Henry Hugh Tudor, commander of the Auxiliaries in Ireland, had advised Churchill that up to 800 “absolutely reliable men” could be made available from those forces. About £2 million – a huge sum for the 1930s – was spent on erecting a rampart along Palestine’s northern frontier. Photograph: Getty Images On May 14th, 1948, British rule in Palestine came to an end; Israel declared itself a state that same day. The British authorities chose not to intervene. General Sir Alan Cunningham, Palestine High Commissioner: the Dubliner was in charge during the mass expulsion of Palestinians by Zionist forces, an episode called the Nakba or catastrophe. Not everything went to plan: the Zionist movement fell out with and, in the case of two groups, waged a campaign of guerilla warfare against Britain in the 1940s. Alan Cunningham was born in Dublin. Photograph: Getty Images Some of the men behind projects that are still reviled today were originally from Ireland. Photograph: Getty Images Balfour was among many British political figures to leave a deep impression on both Ireland and Palestine. He recommended that the most sophisticated surveillance technology of that era should be installed in “Tegart’s fence”, as the project was dubbed. Photograph: Getty Images In effect, then, the Black and Tans and the Auxiliaries were assigned to Palestine once their presence in Ireland was no longer deemed necessary. Later in the 1930s, a full-scale Palestinian revolt erupted. Did I know, she asked, that Winston Churchill sent the Black and Tans to Palestine? His memoirs make clear that he brought a great deal of bigotry with him. Karma Nabulsi, a politics professor at Oxford University, introduced me to one such fragment. Cunningham had been in charge during the mass expulsion of Palestinians by Zionist forces, an episode called the Nakba or catastrophe. Britain’s imperial archives show that some diplomats asked if the “Black and Tan tradition” was being followed in Palestine. One of those forces’ most notorious escapades occurred in my hometown – Balbriggan, Co Dublin. Faced with unrest in 1921, Samuel ordered air strikes against Palestinian rioters and declared a state of emergency. That conversation helped me grasp why Irish people tend to feel a sense of affinity with …

UCD ex-president tries his hand at campus novel

The professors are fulltime but certainly not whole time! This combined with my own university experience qualified me to address the theme of my novel from the viewpoints of both poacher and gamekeeper. Saint Chinian is the result. This comic novel follows the hilarious events which unfold throughout the week of the committee’s visit. For a moderate amount of study, which does not greatly encroach upon their leisure time, they are assured of a fairly decent degree and a job – possibly even a pensionable one. I have had the pleasure of experiencing various phases of academic life beginning as a student in UCD and Louvain University. Life is good at the young University of Saint Chinian in sunlit southwest France. Others claim Williams as the inspiration for John Vaizey’s Barometer Man – I would not be surprised if both were true. The theme was probably inspired by the writings of two great campus novelists, Malcolm Bradbury and David Lodge. I met Lodge, author of Changing Places, when we were both very junior academics with young children on a rainy holiday in Connemara. In 1986 the relics were translated into administration and I was appointed President of UCD, where I exercised my only administrative skill of wise delegation! I journeyed on through various stages as College Lecturer, Professor and Dean of Philosophy. My beloved wife Frankie had unsuccessfully encouraged me to write a novel. It was while there that I had the lively experience of being a member or chair of university quality appraisal committees in several countries. Patrick Masterson with his late wife Frankie, who had unsuccessfully encouraged him to write a novel, in their vineyard near St Chinian Since 2002 I spend much of the year in a small village in the Languedoc region of France close by Saint Chinian. Shortly after she died a few years ago my devoted but disrespectful children urged me to take a break from my “incomprehensible philosophical scribbling” and write something they could understand. The cold wind of managerial intimidation, so common in other areas of contemporary life, is about to blow through the hallowed halls of academe. My comic novel Quality Time at Saint Chinian is situated in an imaginary French provincial university. All involved enjoy a happy time. It culminates in an epic confrontation for the soul of the university between the proselytising commercial passion of Chairman Kerstin and the …

Philip Boucher-Hayes places rational interest over religious belief

When O’Carroll says that he is acquainted with such “esoteric knowledge”, he is rebuffed by the host: “It’s not esoteric, it’s science.” It’s a fascinating interview, in which the incredulous host vainly tries to square his empirical values with his otherwise rational guest’s beliefs. This sounds like a bombshell for road safety policy until Jennings adds the magic words “according to independent TD Danny Healy-Rae”. “If you’re down,” he says, “the best thing you can do is work with stone.” It doesn’t matter who we are, we need a rock of faith, whatever it might be. But funny too. “Did you ever seek a more scientific answer?” Boucher-Hayes asks, pointing to other possible explanations, such as electro-magnetic fields or hallucinogenic fungal spores. Rational side of Boucher-Hayes Philip Boucher-Hayes, meanwhile, shows his rational side when he stands in as host of Liveline (RTÉ 1, weekdays) as well as scepticism towards tales of religious apparitions. Pádraig Póil, from Inis Oírr, describes how building walls takes time and patience but is “good for our wellbeing”. Still, it would be good to hear the host approach the topic with the same rigour he applies to Wednesday’s dissection of Enda Kenny’s record, when clips of the departing Taoiseach’s surprisingly stirring speeches are contrasted with his actions, to generally unflattering effect. But when O’Carroll saw an image on a Sacred Heart ornament in the station he recognised the man he’d seen: Fr John Sullivan, the revered Jesuit priest who died in 1933 and was recently beatified by the Catholic Church. Ray D’Arcy, for one, recognises this, as he skewers Healy-Rae’s contributions to an Oireachtas committee (The Ray D’Arcy Show, RTÉ Radio 1, weekdays). Referring to the headscarf she wears to cover hair loss caused by her treatment, D’Arcy asks her, “Where’s the hair at now?” “I’ve more than you anyway,” Sorcha shoots back. In weary tones, the host says that while he would have laughed in the deputy’s face, “the fact that it was on the news, and that I’m talking about it, gives oxygen to the whole thing”. The material is stretched at times – there’s a long interview with Leo Moran of the Saw Doctors, on the strength of his song N17 mentioning stone walls – and perhaps could have done with more historical or artistic context. Retired detective Gerry O’Carroll recounts how, when investigating the IRA murder of a Garda colleague in 1976, …