Elbow’s Guy Garvey: ‘You love the person with all their warts and bellybutton fluff’

“It was a bit of an indulgence – and also healthy, I think, to go and see what it’s like to work with other people and be solely responsible for the output for a little while. Most bands fall out over money, eventually, even if that is unspoken. Imagine trying to describe that?!” he says, laughing huskily and heartily. It meant the lads could go and do projects that they wanted to do as well. The album ends with that sample of the lads discussing forming a loop out of dropping a bag of kindling out of hitting a tambourine – that was the very, very first thing we did for the album, which is why we ended with it.” The four remaining members decamped to Gargunnock, a small village near Stirling, after Jupp’s departure to plant the seeds of Little Fictions. “‘That’s it, man – I’m going to South America, fuck this joint’.” It may well be his turn to be disillusioned but middle-age, it seems, suits Guy Garvey – whether he can drive or not. “It was good to be dismayed in one another’s company. Life throws new challenges at me all the time – ‘challenges’, that makes me sound like an adrenaline junkie – but I love being 40-odd. But the nature of true love is that you love the person with all their warts, and spots, and bellybutton fluff and whatever. Then he perks up almost immediately. “It’s something that I wouldn’t have done if it had in any way messed with the band,” he says. Guy Garvey has had better mornings. Missing home, pondering what had happened with Jupp, pondering Brexit… “Oh well, fuck it.” Luckily, Garvey has something positive to focus on – Elbow’s latest studio album Little Fictions. You’re like ‘This guy is 25 and he has no fuckin’ idea about any of my cultural references.’ Before I met Rachael, I dated a girl who didn’t know who The Krankies were. That’s where my head was at.” Happier times, as always, also inform Little Fictions; last year, Garvey married actress Rachael Stirling (daughter of Dame Diana Rigg) in a low-key ceremony at Manchester Town Hall. It was freezing, and we got snowed in, and we set all our equipment up around the fire in the Great Room of Gargunnock House; my wife’s father actually owns an estate up there, and Gargunnock House is …

Irish writers on Costa Short Story Award shortlist

a well-constructed cinematic plot populated by a diverting range of strange beings, human and otherwise… Paul Perry, artistic director of the 11th Ennis Book Club Festival, which runs from March 3rd-5th, has announced its full programme. Casey’s story Old Tricks features in Dead Simple, a crime collection edited by Harry Bingham, which also includes short stories by Mark Billingham and Antonia Hodgson. Throw into the mix Paul Durcan, Rose Tremain, Little John Nee and you’re in for something singular in Irish literary culture.” Highlights include Anne Enright in conversation with Donal Ryan; 10 Books You Should Read with Cónal Creedon & Lisa McInerney; Sinéad Gleeson in conversation with Anne Devlin, Éilís Ní Dhuibhne and Eimear Ryan; and Sunday Symposium: Sports and Politics with Patrick Deeley, Paul Kimmage, Alison O’Connor, Christy O’Connor and Sonia O’Sullivan. The fifth annual Doolin Writers’ Weekend, in partnership with the University of Limerick’s creative writing programme, take places from February 3rd-5th, with Goldsmiths Prize winner Mike McCormack and Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize Winner Sara Baume, poet Rita-Ann Higgins, Claire Louise Bennett, Alan McMonagle, Karl Parkinson and more. doolinfestivals.com The UCC’s School of English reading series resumes at the Creative Zone, Boole Library, on January 31st at 7.30pm with Mike McCormack; Pond author Claire-Louise Bennett; and Conor O’Callaghan, whose Nothing on Earth was one of Eileen Battersby’s books of the year. Details at irishwriterscentre.ie Asking for It by Louise O’Neill was named a Printz Honor Book at the American Library Association youth media awards this week. Rudden has mastered the art of making us question our assumptions about fantasy and its workings.” Dublin-born crime writer Jane Casey is one of the authors chosen to feature in Galaxy Quick Reads, a British initiative now in its 11th year which publishes six £1 titles each spring by bestselling authors aimed at the one in six adults who struggles with reading. She lives in London. ADVERTISEMENT Young Dublin readers will be borrowing Knights of the Borrowed Dark this spring as Dave Rudden’s popular YA debut has been chosen by Dublin City Council Public Libraries as the focus of their 2017 Citywide Reading Campaign, which encourages children to read for pleasure. The workshops programme caters for every level and type of writer. The series will be made up of short evening talks on the different aspects of the publishing process, aimed at writers and anyone interested in publishing. O’Callaghan, from Cork, …

Elbow’s Guy Garvey: hard truths and ‘Little Fictions’

Most bands fall out over money, eventually, even if that is unspoken. Were my parents as worried as I am now about the state of things? You’re like ‘This guy is 25 and he has no fuckin’ idea about any of my cultural references.’ Before I met Rachael, I dated a girl who didn’t know who The Krankies were. “It’s interesting when you feel yourself being looked upon as an ‘older man’ by somebody you consider yourself the same age as. “It’s something that I wouldn’t have done if it had in any way messed with the band,” he says. Their seventh album comes hot on the heels of his own fine solo album Courting the Squall, released in 2015. by the end of the song, I’ve decided to fuck off to the Atacama Desert with my wife in a static caravan,” he adds, laughing. “It’s not like it was an overnight thing – we did 25 years, and after 25 years, you expect that somebody maybe might have had enough. Imagine trying to describe that?!” he says, laughing huskily and heartily. .” Jupp’s departure perversely made for a more beat and groove-driven album than before, as heard on songs such as Gentle Storm and Firebrand & Angel. That’s where my head was at.” Happier times, as always, also inform Little Fictions; last year, Garvey married actress Rachael Stirling (daughter of Dame Diana Rigg) in a low-key ceremony at Manchester Town Hall. “Just pre-Brexit, I was in India for the first time, and missing home and also acutely aware of what home might become – and it did,” he sighs. The album ends with that sample of the lads discussing forming a loop out of dropping a bag of kindling out of hitting a tambourine – that was the very, very first thing we did for the album, which is why we ended with it.” The four remaining members decamped to Gargunnock, a small village near Stirling, after Jupp’s departure to plant the seeds of Little Fictions. When he answers the phone in the kitchen of his north Manchester home, he has some bad news: “I failed my driver theory test earlier,” he glumly reveals. “Craig has had a hand in the groove side of what we do from day one – him and Jupp always worked on the beats together. I was wandering around the place, saying ‘Rach, every …

How the hipster came to haunt modern culture

Living in a world that says we can always do better, a world that consistently presents the impossible and unreachable as ordinary and everyday, we live with the cruel optimism that we might uncover “a meaningful narrative” about who we are. This seems true, to a greater or lesser extent, regardless of political or geographic background. All of a sudden, it’s gauche. We say to others, “Here I am.” We are asserting the coherence and strength of our own story, using it as a bulwark against the pressures and demands of life in the 21st century. Who is allowed the time and energy to perfect their performance? In writing about right-wing online trolls, Tara Isabella Burton describes an almost religious desire for “a meaningful narrative of the world that allows for participation”. It was hardly what they wanted anyway. At its most extreme, we usually call these people “hipsters”. The fiction of a life performed is always more attractive and more palatable than the unvarnished truth. Who is rejected for failing to do so? Like all images, they obscure and exclude as much as they impart. Series concluded Any sense of identity is cultivated over time, iterated upon, A/B tested and improved. They may be insecure in their jobs or their relationships, or it may be that they’re insecure about how they look, how they dress, what they eat, where they live. Let’s return to Don Draper’s assertion that happiness is a feeling that comes from being told that we’re doing okay. The behaviours sketched out over the last week all share this idea of performance, whether that’s on Facebook or the wind-blown terraces of Dalymount Park. This series of articles has largely been about how we perform our stories of ourselves for others. It is typical of the modern world to encourage a more and more totalised consumerism – essentially replacing social markers of identity and solidarity with the vagaries of taste and purchasing power – while at the same time punishing those who take it too far. ADVERTISEMENT The people in these articles have hardly been the most oppressed and downtrodden cohort. We cringe because the construct hasn’t worked – it’s too obvious, too full-on. As Rob Horning has written, for the hipster, “Everything becomes just another signifier of personal identity.” The hipster, a figure which haunts modern culture, is really nothing more than visible, shameful evidence of …

Elbow’s Guy Garvey talks hard truths and ‘Little Fictions’

It was freezing, and we got snowed in, and we set all our equipment up around the fire in the Great Room of Gargunnock House; my wife’s father actually owns an estate up there, and Gargunnock House is owned by ancestors of my wife. “So I was despairing of that, and trying to work out if it’s just my turn to despair because I’m 40-plus. When Sting turns up in a Ferrari and Andy Summers can’t buy a burger.. by the end of the song, I’ve decided to fuck off to the Atacama Desert with my wife in a static caravan,” he adds, laughing. Most bands fall out over money, eventually, even if that is unspoken. “I think the fear of not having a drummer caused us to do a lot of drum work,” he says. Then he perks up almost immediately. You’re like ‘This guy is 25 and he has no fuckin’ idea about any of my cultural references.’ Before I met Rachael, I dated a girl who didn’t know who The Krankies were. “‘That’s it, man – I’m going to South America, fuck this joint’.” It may well be his turn to be disillusioned but middle-age, it seems, suits Guy Garvey – whether he can drive or not. “The title track is going through ritualistic arguments, and why it happens: ‘We protect our little fictions when we bow to fear, little wilderness mementos only you and me hear’. Life throws new challenges at me all the time – ‘challenges’, that makes me sound like an adrenaline junkie – but I love being 40-odd. So we were all busy, and we all came back to the party with new and interesting ways of working.” Now established as one of the UK’s bona fide biggest bands, Elbow’s past year has not been without its troubles. It’s better this way because he wanted it that way, and so did we. ADVERTISEMENT “The beginning of K2 starts with me in India, wondering if anybody at home actually knows where I am, because I didn’t tell my family before I went. “It’s not like it was an overnight thing – we did 25 years, and after 25 years, you expect that somebody maybe might have had enough. Were my parents as worried as I am now about the state of things? Their seventh album comes hot on the heels of his own fine …

‘Mother River’: photographs of life along China’s Yangtze

Preston gives a public talk on January 28th at noon. “They gave my mum back her wages, so they admit they made a mistake. Given China’s difficult history with Tibet, this could have led to trouble, but instead she found a region where people mingled, and the complexities of overlapping cultures meant there were no clear lines of demarcation. In the case of Yan Wang Preston, that country was China. He told me that after the war he was chased by the Liberation Army. galleryofphotography.ie The embankment is almost as early as the Great Wall, so you can see the damage the river had made. But in the course of her four-year project to document its length, she endured altitude sickness, sandstorms and mud slides, and temperatures ranging from minus 30 to plus 44 degrees; was attacked by wild dogs and had to self-inject for a week against rabies; and met both the dispossessed and the newly industrialised along its banks. In the Garze Tibetan Autonomous Region of the Sichuan province, she writes: “This bed does not exist any more. “I found things that surprised me,” Preston says. So I knew how to deal with the physical challenges, and how to survive in the wilderness.” Opting not to seek permits to go to the Tibetan region, she instead got help from people she met on the way. But it’s the same with everyone I know, a lot of my parents’ friends, they don’t discuss it. “I felt photography had this intense power over me,” she says. Describing herself (back then) as “romantic, idealistic and not very realistic at all”, she took up photography, studying at Leeds then Plymouth Universities. “Her ‘Y’ system of marking the points to photograph makes a new point about representations of China. Maybe they had no option. He contemplated suicide, he had kept a gun and a few bullets for himself. “Going back to photograph the Yangtze river was a way to reconnect.” In addition to some hair-raising moments, she had to draw on multiple skills. “We say the Yangtze river unites the whole of China but that’s a political thing; the river is just a river. It has been happening since the Opium War in the 1840s, when China’s wake-up call for modernisation came. ADVERTISEMENT “China’s modernisation cannot be stopped. It’s the third-longest river in the world, and the longest to flow entirely within one …

Mary Tyler Moore: A singular figure in TV history

Mary Tyler Moore Show clip: Chuckles the Clown’s Funeral At 17, she began to get work as a professional dancer. The shot then freezes in a state of ecstatic incompletion. Upbringing Mary Tyler Moore was born in the attractive New York quarter of Brooklyn Heights to a middle-class family. In 1980, however, she received an Oscar nomination for playing a bereaved mother in Robert Redford’s Ordinary People. From the moon landing to the arrival of president Jimmy Carter, the series caught the national mood without ever seeming to strain for importance. The Moore clan then moved to Los Angeles when Mary was eight. MTM Enterprises, her production company, created a number of hit shows, such as the excellent Mary Tyler Moore Show spin-offs Rhoda and Lou Grant. It was indeed Mrs Ford on the phone, such was the show’s reputation during its high period. Excited at being young and alive, her character throws her hat joyously in the air. Following the famously moving final episode of the Mary Tyler Moore Show, Moore acted only intermittently. One of the most memorable moments saw Mary, with a scornful laugh, putting the phone down on Betty Ford, because she refused to believe the voice was really that of the then first lady. As the news of her death emerged, thousands of fans surely retired to YouTube to play the famous closing moment of the Mary Tyler Moore Show title sequence. Married three times, she managed diabetes for most of her life and had occasional struggles with alcoholism. No more evocative image exists of TV in the early 1970s. That part had an eerie echo the very same year, when her own son accidently killed himself with a shotgun. ADVERTISEMENT Bit parts in TV followed, before Carl Reiner cast her in The Dick Van Dyke show. R.I.P #maryTylerMoore "who can take a nothing day and make it all seem worthwhile well it's you girl and u should know it"— John Leguizamo (@JohnLeguizamo) January 25, 2017 Thank you for changing the face of TV, #MaryTylerMoore! pic.twitter.com/3rZbPczSnF— Viola Davis (@violadavis) January 25, 2017 Thanks for the first real image of a woman being independent, funny & vulnerable. A minute's silence as we remembered 1 of the true greats of TV comedy pic.twitter.com/UFHIkvWg3i— Stephen Fry (@stephenfry) January 25, 2017 Rehearsing on the #MaryTylerMoore stage today. But it was her role as Mary Richards in The Mary Tyler …

Break dry January in style with our guide to the best gigs, art shows and theatre for the week ahead

Banjo & Bovril Festival Harbour Bar, Bray Also Wed-Sat Free theharbourbar.ie Bray gets in on the folk act this weekend with its own rootsy festival running all weekend. Joey Negro The Hangar Dublin 10.30pm €17.50 hangardublin.ie Dave Lee has proven to be a handy man when it comes to monikers and alter-egos over the years, though it’s as Joey Negro that he’s had the biggest impact. It is hard to say what, if anything, is “real” in this strange and septic world. Orb main mover Alex Paterson is joined at The Orb controls these days by Thomas Fehlmann. Fouéré plays Morob’s daughter as an ethereal avenger, attended (like Hecate) by a pack of dogs, while the material world and its concrete history seems to distend as though in a dream. Anyone with an appetite for a total, unconditional knees up has probably already bagged tickets for the tightly packed programme at Dublin Castle on Saturday night featuring Altan, the indomitable Four Men & A Dog and Boffin To Burren: the Dogs in particular, know how to party like few others. Support from Leigh Farrell. ADVERTISEMENT MONDAY The Pillowman Gaiety Theatre, Dublin Ends Feb 5 7.30pm (Sat & Sun mat 2.30pm) €24.50 gaietytheatre.ieKaturian K Katurian, an author of grisly fantasies, is admirably succinct with his own plot synopsis: “A writer in a totalitarian state is interrogated about the gruesome content of his short stories and their similarities to a number of child murders that are happening in his town.” Like that arch self-reference, Martin McDonagh’s 2003 play creates an artful mesh between reality and fiction. All gigs are free. exmagician Whelan’s Dublin 8pm €15 whelanslive.com Formed by James Smith and Danny Todd out of the ashes of Belfast band Cashier No 9, exmagician released one of last year’s most underrated albums (Scan the Blue), so it’s good to see that lack of awareness from the general public isn’t keeping them back. “Morob is not in his grave,” announces Olwen Fouéré in Laurent Gaudé’s new play, translated from French by its co-director and star, and what might have been the premise for a political thriller becomes instead a meditation on people dissolving between myth and reality, bodies sublimated into symbols. Support from Cáit Fahey (Dip). THURSDAY Interference, with Glen Hansard Opera House Cork 7.30pm €35 (sold out) corkoperahouse.ie Fergus O’Farrell (who passed away 12 months ago) was a songwriter and singer of …

From 1984 to Brave New World: six of the best books to read in Trumpian times

Truth and lies now run together in a parallel universe. We by Yevgeny Zamyatin (1921) The Russian thinker got there first, long before Huxley, who claimed never to have read it, and before Orwell, who admitted his immense debt to We, and decades before JG Ballard, who would have had a field day with the Trump phenomenon. He’s not Milton’s Satan from Paradise Lost, and not dastardly clever like Batman’s nemesis, the Joker. Google, Facebook et al have ensured that Big Brother is watching all of us, while Trump and his team of advisers play doublespeak as a natural reflex. Napoleon is described by Orwell as “a large, rather fierce-looking Berkshire boar.” Sounds familiar? This is the core text, written by an American 11 years before Trump was born. ADVERTISEMENT You may wish to re-read Kafka’s The Trial (1925), written as the Austro-Hungarian collapsed but the harrowing depiction of helplessness in the face of power may prove too stark at a time as desperate as ours. ADVERTISEMENT Animal Farm by George Orwell (1935) Eileen Battersby: How can America begin to heal? Should you be pressed for time, head straight for We and It Can Never Happen Here and then wonder, and continue to wonder, why it did. She too resides in an absurdist alternative universe. He is best compared with Carroll’s petulant Queen of Hearts. Truth is no longer an option, even crowd numbers are disputed. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (1865) Trying to find Trump’s alter ego in literature is tricky, as usually the bad guys are at least dignified. An erstwhile Bolshevik, Zamyatin brilliantly looked to Swift in dissecting the follies of totalitarianism. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (1932) Nothing brave about it; the world can no longer depend on the evidence of our eyes. Well admittedly Donald Trump bears far more resemblance to Orwell’s crazed porcine dictator of the same name than he does with the Corsican who became emperor of France. Human intelligence has been erased. Instead of “All animals are equal…” now read “All Americans are equal, but some Americans are more equal than others.” Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell (1949) Orwell understood all about how empty rhetoric and sound bites, as well as high-pitched delivery, can brainwash a defeated public – again reference Hitler. In Huxley’s vision of a world dictated to by delusion and the passive acceptance of lies, policy …

The Spinning Heart review: an ensemble performance of an atomised community

This creates a curious and perhaps fitting contradiction: an ensemble performance of an atomised community. – Until Jan 28 For the divided families, betrayed workers and squinting neighbours, those circumstances match the manner of telling: everything is turned inside out. Together but apart, they make the stage seem more supportive than collaborative. As such, it offers its performers uncontested moments to shine; when one character speaks here, for instance, others watch (occasionally in tableaux of neighbourly suspicion) or stand in, silently, like living props. ADVERTISEMENT As the decent, battered foreman Bobby Mahon (a contemporary ringer for Synge’s would-be father-killer Christy), Killian Coyle is a solid and sympathetic anchor. But for the schizoid Trevor, who conspires to kidnap a child, he is a quiver of blinks and tics, given the black hat and gloves of a cartoon burglar. Not every character here is essential. Instead of the spry tapestry of Under Milk Wood, say, it results in something uniformly quilted, like A Chorus Line. The show becomes unbalanced in other ways, though, when performers resort to caricature either to distinguish between their roles or exhibit their range. Each is allowed a confessional story, told in the first person and in quick succession, which piece together to form the striving narrative of a recession-era Irish town. The technique of Ryan’s book, though, with its population of 21 characters, is to let everyone become the centre of the universe. In Articulate Anatomy’s staging, however, everything is pretty much left alone. On page, the story’s rhythms are easier to regulate – whatever reviews say, one of the appeals of any novel is that it is putdownable – but onstage the pace becomes unvaried and eventually wearying. Delivered as a series of monologues, this is less an adaptation of the novel than a supple edit. The Spinning Heart ★★★ Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin “It’s difficult living in a universe with a population of one,” confides one of the more confused characters (a try-hard solipsist), in Donal Ryan’s debut novel, The Spinning Heart, from 2012. If director Paul Brennan’s staging often plays like a suite of audition pieces – bright, eager and declamatory – there’s good reason: the production started as an acting school showcase. That figure was already OTT, you can argue, but it compromises the sensitivity to mental anguish displayed elsewhere in this depressed community. That’s emblematic of an overstretched production that understands, with necessary …

Going Out – the best gigs, shows and exhibitions to see in the coming week

All gigs are free. Joey Negro The Hangar Dublin 10.30pm €17.50 hangardublin.ie Dave Lee has proven to be a handy man when it comes to monikers and alter-egos over the years, though it’s as Joey Negro that he’s had the biggest impact. Best call in sick to work now so. Oonagh Young Gallery, 1 James Joyce St, Dublin. exmagician Whelan’s Dublin 8pm €15 whelanslive.com Formed by James Smith and Danny Todd out of the ashes of Belfast band Cashier No 9, exmagician released one of last year’s most underrated albums (Scan the Blue), so it’s good to see that lack of awareness from the general public isn’t keeping them back. ADVERTISEMENT The Orb The Limelight Belfast 10pm £16.90 theorb.com Twenty-five years after the release of their classic debut album, The Orb hit the road to demonstrate what Adventures Beyond the Ultraworld sounds like with a quarter century of hard living under the bonnet. For their 100th edition (bravo!), curators Lioba Petrie and Karen Dervan have pulled together a typically diverse programme, including Stravinsky, Leonard Bernstien, a world premiere by David Stalling, the Spackling Band and the Dublin Guitar Quartet.  – Siobhán Long FRIDAY Hattie Webb & Jack O’Rourke White Horse, Ballincollig Cork 8.30pm €20 (sold out) whitehorse.ie Time for a very cool line-up featuring a solo show from Hattie Webb (you may be more familiar with her as one of the Webb Sisters, a UK vocal duo that formed part of Leonard Cohen’s latter-day touring band) and a set from Cork singer and songwriter, Jack O’Rourke, whose debut album, Dreamcatcher, was one of last year’s best. Anyone with an appetite for a total, unconditional knees up has probably already bagged tickets for the tightly packed programme at Dublin Castle on Saturday night featuring Altan, the indomitable Four Men & A Dog and Boffin To Burren: the Dogs in particular, know how to party like few others. Maeve Mulrennan invited a number of artists to respond to the idea, with either something they were working on, or something especially made. A video piece features a fictional character, Alfred Sitzfleisch, who fantasises about crossing paths with both of them. Until February 24th oonaghyoung.com Stephen Brandes has become associated with big, sprawling, episodic narrative drawings on floor vinyl, telling tales of migration and displacement. Orb main mover Alex Paterson is joined at The Orb controls these days by Thomas Fehlmann. ADVERTISEMENT MONDAY The …

Sarah Jarosz: ‘I was the only 11-year-old going to the bluegrass jam with my mom’

He had left a voicemail saying ‘I just wanna say that I have your record and I love it very much, I love your voice – please give me a call.’ We wound up chatting on the phone – this was maybe a month after the record came out – and we had a really great chat. Coupled with her beautiful, beguiling voice, it makes for a concoction that hits the sweet spot for those with even a passing interest in the genre. There’s so much music to be played.” Sarah Jarosz plays St Werburgh’s Church as part of the Temple Bar Trad Fest on January 25th (After attending a concert co-headlined by Jarosz and her fellow Americana musician Parker Millsap last October, John took to social media to call it “one of the best concerts I have ever seen”, praising Millsap and Jarosz as “astonishingly good.”) “The whole thing was pretty incredible,” she says, on the phone from her New York home. Now, it’s cool because a lot of those people who were my heroes then, I think of them as friends and as peers. I think that really affected me, especially early on, to want to keep working hard. “We all hung out backstage maybe for four hours altogether; all he wanted to do was talk about music and hang out and sit on the couch, and it was totally surreal.” Jarosz has become a darling of the Americana and bluegrass scene, and with good reason. The coolest thing he said was ‘I really love seeking out new music and calling people, and telling them that I love it – because when people did that for me when I was young, it meant the world to me.’” ADVERTISEMENT When John found out that Jarosz and Millsap were touring together, he caught their concert in Atlanta. She talks about her future ambitions not in terms of “this year” or “next year”, but of “the next twenty, thirty years.” ADVERTISEMENT “It never felt like there was just one day came and it was overnight success; I’ve been working and chipping away at it for about a decade now, basically,” she says. I checked my email and I had an email from my manager that said ‘Elton John is asking for your number’. “My parents are both big music lovers and I remember hearing the mandolin on a Nickel Creek record,” …

Dermot Lambert: “I have seen the best bands on earth, most people will never hear them”

Part of doing it properly means showing up and paying for your own rehearsals. Not Dermot Lambert. “There is an element of, if you really really want this, then do it properly. His time with Blink didn’t leave him with a great financial stability, so of course, he went and got a regular job. “It wasn’t like we sold half a million albums and everyone loves us. You’re not going to walk into Musicmaker and ask for a free guitar are you? Garageland do all the things that bands starting out don’t know how to do yet: book and pay a venue, hire the backline, stage manager, sound engineer and promote the show through their network and partners (IMRO, Hot Press, 2FM and Garageland’s own 2XM show). He also is one of the owners of the original wood from the Ha’Penny Bridge, which he’s providing to Fender to make guitars. It’s not sane, I do think it’s very healthy.” Lambert counsels bands to go their own way, as much as possible, and is skeptical of government grants for music. Garageland For sixteen years, he’s been in charge of Garageland, a gig showcase series under the name The Garage Gigs that was supposed to end with four gigs in August 2000. “It wasn’t a big surprise,” says Lambert. It’s a transparent approach which Lambert extends to his dealings with the band, especially about what may lie ahead. But you’d come home from tour and take whatever bar job you can get. We just never got that far.” Lambert worked in pubs like Russell’s in Ranelagh when he wasn’t pursuing music. The experiences are great, if you just take the perceived failures out of the equation, it’s some ride.” Lambert says he’s just trying to give these emerging bands a good footing, grounded in reality, and that most of the issues that come up at Garage gigs come from inexperience and anxiety. We couldn’t change into what they wanted to be and they were having a big breakout with Radiohead at the time.” Perception vs. “It tore the song apart. “That’s the bittersweet thing about what I do.” reality in the music industry Sure, there was confusion and uncertainty but Lambert is a pragmatist. Tick all your own boxes. It’s the part of the music story that people don’t like to talk about. Anyone who has gone through the major label music …

Songs of the week: The Musical Slave, Gorillaz, Father John Misty and Young Fathers

THE MUSICAL SLAVE No Plan  ★★★★★ Freed Slave Records This song has been doing the rounds online all week. Kristin Vollset is a street musician from Bergen, Norway, who fell in with a gang of teenage horse enthusiasts after crashing her van into their stable in inner city Dublin. But too damned suave and talented either to dismiss. ADVERTISEMENT The band’s fifth studio album is due for release later this year. GORRILAZ ft. YOUNG FATHERS Only God Knows ★★★ Big Dada Danny Boyle calls this track, which plays over the closing credits of his new Trainspotting sequel T2, a “heartbeat for the film” and a successor to the original film’s generation iconic finale Born Slippy by Underworld. No pressure then. But I’m including it anyway because, even if you’ve heard it before, No Plan is, by a country mile, the sweetest, most tenderly observed and heart-warming music video I’ve seen in a long time. FATHER JOHN MISTY Pure Comedy ★★★★ Sub Pop On the title track from Josh Tillman’s third album as Father John Misty, the former Fleet Foxes drummer takes swipes at consumerism, climate change and organised religion. The rapport she strikes up with her “Celtic warrior tribe” is the stuff of feelgood movies. You’ll have to watch the bloody thing to find out how she did that. BENJAMIN CLEMENTINE Hallelujah Money  ★★★ Parlophone Damon Albarn and Jamie Hewlett’s first new track since 2011’s The Fall album is this off-kilter, anti-Trump diatribe sung by 2015 Mercury Prize winner Benjamin Clementine. As usual, he’s too arch, too clever and too smug to really love. Online reaction has mostly been negative, but it’s got a bonkers, Van Dyke Parks quality to it I rather enjoy. Perhaps the song’s most unlikely achievement, though, is rendering the vulgar expression “I’m gonna choke your chicken” in a context so funny and touching, it actually moved this jaded, emotionally stunted critic to tears.

Paris Jackson: ‘I believe my dad was murdered’

In a wide-ranging interview, she also claimed she was sexually assaulted by a “complete stranger” when she was 14 and spoke about her battle with depression and drug addiction. The daughter of Michael Jackson has said she believes her father was murdered and revealed she attempted suicide “multiple times” after his death. “Picture your parent crying to you about the world hating him for something he didn’t do, ” she told the magazine. It sounds like a total conspiracy theory and it sounds like bullshit, but all real fans and everybody in the family knows it. It was a set up. “It was just once that it became public,” she told Rolling Stone. All arrows point to that. She also revealed her father would cry in front of her after he was accused of child abuse. She also spoke about her “self-hatred” when she attempted suicide in 2013 and revealed she had tried to kill herself “multiple times”. ADVERTISEMENT “And for me, he was the only thing that mattered.” – PA ‘It’s obvious. And at some point he was like, ‘They’re gonna kill me one day’. The singer’s personal physician, Dr Conrad Murray, was later convicted of involuntary manslaughter and sentenced to four years in prison. Paris — who was 11 when Jackson died — said that while she blamed Murray for her father’s addiction to the drug propofol, she was playing a “chess game” as she sought justice over his death. Paris said she “didn’t tell anybody” about the alleged sexual assault on her and denied claims that Jackson was not her biological father. On her father’s death, Paris said: “He would drop hints about people being out to get him. Paris Jackson, 18, told Rolling Stone magazine she thought the pop superstar’s death in 2009 was a “set up” and he would “drop hints” that people wanted to kill him. It was bullshit.“ Jackson, 50, died in 2009 after taking a lethal combination of prescription drugs.

Hillbilly Elegy author JD Vance on Barack Obama: ‘We dislike the things we envy’

His view on the Bay Area is more conflicted, confessing that the unflinching optimism he sees around him can be “weird”. Trump talks like a guy at a bar in West Virginia. I think for some people that’s definitely part of it. There was uproar when Trump caricatured African American inner cities, blighted by violence and poverty. “It is just sort of like everything about him. On one occasion, she demands her young son’s urine so she can pass a drug test at the hospital where she works. I suggest there’s racial dimension to that claim, that the opioid crisis has predominantly infiltrated the homes and families of white people, prompting a far less punitive response to the reaction to the crack epidemic. ADVERTISEMENT “It is in your face, in your family, in your home,” he says, explaining why there is now widespread, bipartisan empathy for addicts. In the coming weeks, Vance will leave San Francisco – keeping the venture capitalist job if he can – and return to his native Ohio, where he has just founded a nonprofit that will help address the opioid epidemic. He insists Thiel’s reputation is unfounded, claiming he is “super thoughtful and incredibly nice”. The first is the subject of the memoir, which charts how he overcame a chaotic upbringing in Middletown, a deprived former steel town in the Ohio rust belt. “Even that, I thought, was sort of excessive,” he recalls. He warned his boss that he might need to take a week of vacation over the summer to promote the book. “He talks in a way that a professor talks, he talks in a way that you sort of aspire to talk if you’re a young law student. He says he met Thiel during a talk the tech entrepreneur gave at Yale and emailed him years later asking for work. On another, she spirals into a rage and threatens to crash a car and kill them both. A few days before our interview, a newspaper in West Virginia, which borders Ohio, revealed pharmaceutical companies had flooded the state with a staggering 780m prescription painkillers over a six-year period – equivalent to 433 for every man, woman and child. When I point out the parallels, Vance shakes his head and demurs. (Guardian service) It was published a few days later under the title: Barack Obama and Me. “But when Trump [delivered] a very …

Patrick Freyne: Tom Hardy’s mumbling Trustafarian hipster is the ultimate Taboo

Now, that would be a TV drama revolution. It’s populated by scarred and tattooed grotesques who cackle and grimace and speak in heightened Shakespearian profanities (it’s like The Irish Times canteen). It’s the olden days and his real name is James Delaney and he is a swaggering Trustafarian hipster who has tribal tattoos and has returned from his gap year (okay, years in the tropics) in order to inherit his mad father’s fortune, sleep with his sister (ideally), flash diamonds around the place, pioneer male cosmetics (well, generic war paint), gentrify the brothel district in which he rents rooms, and, when appropriate, stab people and eat their flesh. In the fourth and final episode (my title: Herself meets The Poor), Herself stops the State taking a child into care by getting the unemployed father a child-friendly job and a flat (Tara’s friend had a spare investment property) because, you know, that’s so easy in Dublin. ADVERTISEMENT Hugs and learning Everyone in Code Black (Wednesday/Thursday, RTÉ1) is good at their jobs. Delaney has also inherited a faraway island that is separately coveted by the East India Company, the Prince Regent and the newly established American state. The always appealing Amy Huberman plays the eponymous Herself (really Tara Rafferty), a solicitor shocked into self-development after witnessing her fiancé doing a bit of “taboo” with another woman. The man just foments melodrama. It could be the incestuous relationship with his sister Zilpha (Oona Chaplin), or that his mother was supposedly a slave (a dubious backstory for a character played by a white actor), or that he is rumoured to have dabbled in black magic and cannibalism and slave trading. They should forgo a longer story arc for more self-contained stories premised on the idea that Herself is a mediocre solicitor. Southsiders drinking lattes Striking Out (Sunday, RTE1) is not, as I thought, a documentary about southsiders drinking lattes but RTÉ’s attempt at creating a legal procedural like The Good Wife. Frankly, there isn’t a taboo going that James Delaney hasn’t seen and liked. “HA HA HA!” Hardy would laugh, as another pleading recordist was fired. Mark Gatiss plays the prince regent as an obese boil-infested wreck (an idealised view, historians might argue). As a hypochondriac, I am now worried I am a) inflating with air, b) need a hole drilled in my head and c) have been bitten by a shark. Well it …

James Joyce and the Easter Rising: the first revisionist

In Ireland today – where “revisionism” is widely, though not universally, accepted – advanced nationalists like Davin no longer command the intellectual heights as once they did. In his novel TransAtlantic, Colum McCann speaks of “the mildew in the room where the past is stored” – and that is an apt metaphor for the condition of Irish historiography before “revisionism”, or in Garvin’s words “true history”, took root. There is absolutely no doubt which side of the argument he favours in the famous Christmas dinner scene in the Portrait when the rights and wrongs of the Parnell “split” of 1890-1 are rehearsed. He added: “There is no party line, and each author was free to express himself as he saw fit according to the evidence available”. Tom Garvin has rightly described it as worthy of the Afghan Taliban. Or was that only possible which came to pass?” Does this suggest that Joyce anticipated the so-called “revisionist” school of Irish history? Celebrating the advances made in Irish historical scholarship, Roy Foster wrote in the TLS in July 2016 that: “In academe and even the world of op-ed journalism, there has been a shift to approaching Ireland’s dramatic history through nuance, complexity and an acceptance of mixed motives and the legitimacy of conflicting traditions.” He noted that, in the battles “around the terrain of Irish historiography”, the battles about “revisionism”: “… In every generation the Irish people have asserted their right to national freedom and sovereignty; six times during the past three hundred years they have asserted it in arms.” These words are familiar to most Irishmen and Irishwomen, as the Proclamation is held to be the foundational document of the modern Irish State. And there are four further conditions – the impossibility of removing the tyranny except by armed force, a proportion between the evil caused and that to be removed by the revolt, serious probability of success, and finally the approval of the community as a whole.” These criteria for justifying the use of force for political ends follow the teaching of St Thomas Aquinas in the thirteenth century, and have been generally accepted in mainstream Western philosophy ever since. With awe Mr Power’s blank voice spoke: – Some say he is not in that grave at all. The first is from the Proclamation issued by the rebels in 1916 and read by PH Pearse, one of the leaders of …

Stuck for a story? Writers should try the library

I overheard one saying to another: “I laughed this morning.” “No!” “Yes, I laughed.” And then there is Startled Stewart who comes in sharking for good-looking men, Lurching Betty, who arrives solely to cause trouble, The Travelling Man who, as he’s taking out his weekly four books, offers some titbit from his life story – a friend of the getaway driver of the Great Train Robbers, a mixer with the criminals of the East End in the Fifties, and then, further back, colourful memories of stowing away on the top of London buses in the late Forties, travelling through the blitzed city and loving every moment of it. I hope it does justice to the library and the people who use it not just for borrowing books, but for sanctuary. Take, for example, the woman who came in, fainted and was attended to by first aiders for half an hour. She got what she came for – half an hour of care and support. The police arrive fairly regularly and escort those who have been collared off the premises. When the doors are opened by security (“Opening the doors all you lovely people!”) at 10am, 40 or 50 people routinely rush in: students for the quiet study areas, parents pushing buggies heading for the children’s area, street sleepers for the toilets, trailed by the regulars toddling in with their plastic carriers of MC Beaton, Agatha Christie, the occasional literary heavyweight, or the latest cookbook by Mary Berry. There are no specifics, just a general feeling of security and silence with a matriarchal figure overseeing it all, policing the silence, stamping the books, sliding the slip into the corner-cut square manila envelope pasted onto the title page. Books were for buying and owning, not borrowing. They know the drug users who come in to shoot up in the toilets, the sneak thieves looking for unattended phones or laptops, the street sleepers who come in to sleep (Street sleepers are welcome, but sleeping is not allowed). Needless to say, it didn’t work. The great majority of those who use the facilities do so with respect. For some it’s their only conversation of the week, for some you’re a confidant, a sympathetic ear, a source of information. A library is not just a place, it’s a state of mind. Like most people I know the library habit had been broken since the children …

Wolfgang Rihm can chat and compose at the same time

That may suggest the idea of music pouring out as a stream that can’t quite be dammed, and there’s something of that to be found in the sense of direction and energy within individual pieces and also in the relationships between pieces. His coolly dispassionate approach presented Rihm’s Verwandlung 4 with an impressively streamlined muscularity. His output runs to more than 400 works, a level that would have been impressive in the 18th or 19th centuries when composers’ work lists were a lot longer than they typically are today. Tennis legend Jimmy Connors once remarked that, “In an era of specialists, you’re either a clay court specialist, a grass court specialist, or a hard court specialist… Inconsistencies of our times This is the second year of the RTÉ NSO’s Music of Our Time season, an intended revitalisation of the Horizons series through which RTÉ had essentially farmed out programming responsibility to Irish composers. The music-making was at its most persuasive when the harmonies were at their richest and sweetest, and the vocal high-jinks at their most pronounced. But no printed material was provided for Rihm and Gardner, and the scattergun conversation from the stage, welcome as it was, did leave essential information uncovered. Markson’s offering was also part of a series. It builds from a quiet start to a strained, pained wall of sound, which retreats to end with the musical equivalent of a fade to black. And he’s hugely prolific, not just by the standards of the 20th or 21st centuries. Grandeur was not on the table for the return visit of San Francisco-based, all-male choir Chanticleer on Sunday. ADVERTISEMENT Musical nerds and musicologists will surely while away many hours tracing connections the music suggests as well as possible specific references. In other words – and this should really be no surprise – it’s the 20th and 21st centuries that suit the style of these astonishingly accomplished vocalists best.  mdervan@irishtimes.com But there’s nothing in the music that makes it at all sound imitative. Conductor Gerhard Markson touched on the nature of Rihm’s musical profuseness in an onstage chat with presenter Ellen Cranitch at the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra’s first Music of Our Time programme of the new year. Perhaps surprisingly, the voices took a little while to settle in for each half of the concert. or you’re Roger Federer. Rihm is fond of creating series of works, and not …