Longitude festival 2017 adds 22 new acts to the line-up

For more see, longitude.ie The day-by-day breakdown has also been announced which will see Stormzy, The Weeknd and Mumford & Sons headlining on Friday, Saturday and Sunday respectively, alongside Skepta, Picture This, Jack Garratt, Kaytranada, Dua Lipa and loads more. The heat is on for this year’s Longitude festival with 22 more acts added to the bill. The latest additions are Young Thug, Gucci Mane, G-Eazy, Leon Bridges, The Martinez Brothers, Earl Sweatshirt, JP Cooper, Mick Jenkins, Dave, Ray BLK, Johnny Flynn & The Sussex Witt, Dermot Kennedy, Sunflower Bean, Palace, Young, Sigrid, Aine Cahill, HVOB & Winston Marshall, Gill Landry, Karen Elson, Bitch Falcon and Wild Youth. Longitude 2017 takes place from July 14th-16th in Marlay Park, Dublin.

‘I love parents telling me they have to read my bloody books EVERY NIGHT’

We’re all guilty of wasting a lot of time staring at screens, when we could be drawing, writing, or just making stuff for our own pleasure. Superheroes were always on their radar, though; Chris reflects, “I did love Superman when I was a kid. I go to great lengths to get this just right, including adding my own sketches and drawings. At “Danger” events he often draws very quickly for the audience, the capacity for which he attributes to “just lots and lots of practice. Andrew is an incredible illustrator himself and very much influenced me when I was younger. Andrew explains the process: “I write the books as a comic script, with an elaborate description of how the illustrations are to be laid out, as well as the actual text on each page. Chris and I have forced ourselves to make loads of short comic strips over the years to entertain each other. It’s only after months of trying new ideas that it finally comes together. “I find that working with restrictions seems to produce the best results, makes my thinking sharper. They ended up photocopying them and they used them for years after. Even when some of the drawings turn out astonishingly bad.” Older brother Andrew Judge also writes and illustrates but has a day job as an architect, noting, “I squeeze writing into any gaps in the day, like the commute to work. Now, we’ve a great relationship, more friends than brothers.” Sibling envy does rear its head, however. Making picture books is incredibly difficult.” Among his earliest briefs was a request, when in secondary school, to turn “incredibly boring dialogues in Irish into comics… I never got paid, though!” Working together on the Create Your Own series, they find themselves very much on the same wavelength. “I love the limitations of picture books,” he says. Create rather than consume.” Claire Hennessy is a writer, editor and creative writing facilitator It’s impossible to know what I will be drawing in the next 10 seconds and that challenge is thrilling. Who needs Marvel comics or blockbuster movies when you have your own imagination? The spies title is influenced by Andrew’s love of the Bond films, while the aliens one is inspired by Chris’s love of sci-fi. Chris then ignores these and does his own thing, which I then have to admit are usually better than my original idea.” …

Not much to sink your teeth into with Nicky Byrne and Jenny Greene

Similarly, the discussion with “guru” Sarah-Jayne Tobin is low in substance but high in spirits. But with a playlist of contemporary pop eating up the airtime and a tone that rarely moves beyond larky banter, the show is a pleasing distraction at best, the radio equivalent of perusing social media updates on a smartphone. McDevitt pulls back when talking to Kathrine Switzer, who tells the gripping tale of how she became the first woman to run in the Boston Marathon 50 years ago. The must-hear items are a segment on “better food choices” and a lifestyle advice slot from an expert. Since arriving at RTÉ, Ray D’Arcy (RTE Radio 1, weekdays) has sometimes seemed tetchy about the presence of a nuacht bulletin on his show, especially when he has to break off an interesting item. Snooker player Ken Doherty recalls his victory in the sport’s World Championship in 1997, but under McDevitt’s relaxed but assured hand goes on to recount evocative tales of his Dublin childhood and his late mother. Out of time? “Everyone loves the story,” she says, “but at the time it was very humiliating, frightening and embarrassing.” But it also made her determined to finish the race. He’s greeted with dead air: for whatever reason, there’s no nuacht. One hopes 2FM charged for the advertising time. What could have been a generic sports piece becomes a rounded, nostalgic portrait. But filling in for Ryan Tubridy on a bank holiday Monday morning in their Second Captains guise (RTÉ Radio 1), they sound slightly unmoored.  The trio (two of whom, Early and Murphy, are Irish Times columnists) retain the flip approach to style and content they forged on Newstalk. She did so, and immediately became an icon for women’s rights. As for McDevitt, he remains understated and sympathetic, no matter that he laconically admits to trying to “bore” his guest with his own marathon stories. Moreover, Switzer’s struggle for equality again appears timely amid our contemporary upheavals. (He’s 38.)  In a Word… After a long silence, the host ruefully mutters: “Níl sé ansin.” Still, at least D’Arcy is speaking as Gaeilge. “I always drank cider,” says Greene. Then again, Byrne and Greene recently increased their listenership so their frothy approach is clearly working. Otherwise, the presenters ask their guest about the future plans of her footballer husband Robbie, or discuss how her son plays football with Byrne’s son. As …

‘Red Dirt captures something very important about what Ireland has done to its young’

EM Reapy’s Red Dirt has a killing in it, a disappearance, a woman in danger and an air of menace, but it’s an altogether more serious piece of work than these elements might suggest Written from the point of view of three characters, the book drew me quickly into a world of young people cut loose from their moorings, living in hostels or shared dormitories, with access to unlimited cheap wine and beer and drugs. When I was young the drugs were harder and the choices seemed more lethal – by the time I was 21 several of my schoolmates and neighbours were dead or in jail, lured by heroin or the glamour of paramilitary commitment. I couldn’t get the book out of my head, and luckily the colleagues around that editorial table felt the same (unusually, they had all read it) I couldn’t get the book out of my head, and luckily the colleagues around that editorial table felt the same (unusually, they had all read it). Its characters find themselves in the vast landscape of Australia, its impossible distances, harsh sun, rich farmland and arid deserts. It seized hold of me in quite other ways than a novel about a crime might, all the more since the narrative contains crimes and allows for the fact that some are never punished or even recognised. It isn’t trying to mimic other versions of the stories we’ve always told each other. Neil Belton is publishing director of Head of Zeus in London. Over the next four weeks, we shall run a series of articles by the author and fellow writers on Red Dirt, culminating in a public interview with Elizabeth Reapy by Laura Slattery of The Irish Times at The Irish Writers Centre in Parnell Square, Dublin 1, on Thursday, May 25th, at 7.30pm, which will be uploaded as a podcast on May 31st on irishtimes.com I liked its swiftness and immediacy. Reapy’s characters are more cruelly robbed of hope, cast out from the Eden of the boom. I still don’t know or care if it had been turned down by other publishers before reaching me. These are novels that have the slick finish of the script for the movie they aspire to become: “grip lit”, perhaps the only space left in adult society where it’s socially acceptable to refer to grown women as “girls” and which the reader forgets once …

George RR Martin signs up for new Game Of Thrones spin-offs

– PA Game Of Thrones fans can look forward to multiple spin-offs from the series, HBO has announced. The British co-writer of Kick-Ass, Jane Goldman, and Carly Wray, who has written for Mad Men, will work with Martin on projects. The much-anticipated seventh and penultimate series of Game Of Thrones begins on Sky Atlantic at 2am on Monday July 17th before being repeated at 9pm. What can you make him do next?’ Game of Thrones finale review: ‘You’re in the great game now’ Ed Sheeran to star in Game of Thrones But fans may have a wait as HBO has not set a deadline for the projects. HBO said the brief of the “very talented writers” was to further explore different time periods of the “vast and rich universe” created by Martin in the A Song Of Ice And Fire fantasy books. The Oscar-winning screenplay writer of LA Confidential, Brian Helgeland, and Kong: Skull Island writer Max Borenstein have also signed contracts to work on the shows. George RR Martin, the creator of the books behind the series, and four writers have signed contracts with the broadcaster. Game of Thrones: ‘Ramsay is so extreme. “We’ll take as much or as little time as the writers need and, as with all our development, we will evaluate what we have when the scripts are in,” a spokeswoman said.

Rachael English: Why I write, and why it took me so long

By then, I was presenting Morning Ireland. The American Girl is published by Hachette Books Ireland Róisín Meets podcast In the latest Róisín Meets podcast, RTÉ presenter Rachael English talks to Róisín Ingle about accidentally writing a novel reflecting the news headlines of the day. The American Girl tells the story of a young woman who becomes pregnant in the 1960s and is sent to a mother and baby home. That this conversation took place during the depths of the recession wasn’t a coincidence. Without thinking about it, we revel in being creative. You carry it in your head and in strange jottings saying things like, “Move paragraph on Tina Bennis to next scene”, or “Winnie Lafferty to reappear after trip to Carrigbrack”. From Gone With The Wind to 1984, The Country Girls to Flowers in the Attic, I tore through everything that appealed to me. I wrote rambling pieces about school in an old office diary. or even older? More than 40 years later, that daughter reaches a crossroads in her own life and decides to start searching for her birth mother. They were finding it impossible to get information about their backgrounds. I spent month after month building my story then tearing it down. Even wanting to be a journalist sounded a bit showy. I tell myself I’m an imposter who should stick to what she knows. I gave up more than once. The truth is, I enjoyed my job. I read books and listened to interviews and scoured message boards. I was obsessive about the history of mother and baby homes and about the ways in which people who try to trace their birth parents are stymied by the system. Her argument was this: as teenagers most of us are passionate about playing sport or singing or painting or something. Book nerves are waking at 4am in a froth of anxiety, wondering if it’s too late to change your mind and remove the book from the shops. The country was changing. Those were good years to be a reporter. Oh, and we didn’t have to listen to people telling us that the old media was dying and that soon enough there wouldn’t be any journalists left. People who have written 10, 20 books, tell me this madness doesn’t go away. I’m often asked about the similarities between writing and broadcasting. I first became interested in adoption stories …

Dara and Ed’s Road to Mandalay: comedians getting along – where’s the fun in that?

Finally they turn up for dinner in Penang in ceremonial garb that Tommy Cooper would have admired. So far, there’s no chance of that. With a packed itinerary and a mild sense of awe, Dara and Ed make for sensitive presenters and endearing tourists, but not riveting guides. “There’s a reason they get comedians to do these kinds of journeys, because we’re actually quite curious anyway,” says O’Briain. “A country doesn’t exist until you’ve told a joke in it,” says Byrne, like comic solipsist. Is it fun to go on holiday with a comedian? What Dara and Ed are more likely to share is an insight into how comedians see the world. During Dara and Ed’s Road to Mandalay (RTÉ One, Thursday, 10.15pm), a three-part travel show that conveys Dara O’Briain and Ed Byrne through South East Asia, the comedians briefly bolster their own credentials. “You don’t become a comedian without wanting to find quirky things in the cultures you visit.” Nobody could resent two such personable fellows for scouring the world for new material, but another reason might be to present unfamiliar views through the lens of an unusual relationship. Where’s the fun in that? (“They’re really shy of new people,” the comedians are told. O’Briain regards Byrne, lost in his embroidered Kurta, and affirms, “I would be proud to attend any international karate tournament that you hosted on your evil island.” It’s the closest they allow themselves to come to a culturally inappropriate remark (which is not very) and also perhaps their funniest. TV producers seem to think so. Dara and Ed are going to get on just fine with South East Asia, and each other. “Well, so are we,” replies Ed, not insincerely.) But it’s more revealing that they translate new experiences into stand-up terms, each performing five minutes in a comedy club in the multicultural capital, later arsing around with the Lion Dance costumes like a pantomime horse in Genting Highlands, then turning their hands to shadow puppetry before an audience in Kota Bharu (and bombing). It’s amusing to visit a strutting display of prize Seramas – chickens that resemble body builders – with them in Kuala Lumpur, and fascinating to meet the displaced and wary Batek tribe in the Taman Negara rainforest. “There’s nothing I enjoy more than telling Ed things,” says O’Briain of his earnest guidebook regurgitations. With Steve Coogan and Rob Bryden sharing …

Fintan O’Toole: Artists’ work cannot be measured like widgets

But behind it is something more fundamental: an attempt to change the way cultural creativity is understood in Ireland. And here the report collapses into nonsense. This whole thing has its roots in a 2015 value for money review of the Arts Council chaired by John O’Hagan, professor of economics at Trinity College Dublin. Orwell meets Gogol. When Colm Tóibín described recent proposals from the Arts Council to make radical changes to the way individual artists are supported by the State as “oddly North Korean”, readers may have been inclined to think he was going over the top. To qualify, a members’ annual income must be less than €25,770. Colm Tóibín slates plan to cut grants for non-productive artists Aosdána is far from perfect but it costs peanuts Aosdána: pay and performance This is emphatically not a runaway gravy-train. As O’Hagan put it “the level and quality of creativity and artistic endeavours that may be attributable to Aosdána members receiving the cnuas is not measurable”. This is emphatically not a runaway gravy-train. I kid you not: the report says of the cnuas that because it is demand-led, it “has the potential to exert limitations on the Arts Council’s ability to deliver on its programme”. What is both surprising and alarming is that the Arts Council seems to have accepted all this uncritically. And, even worse, its effects on the annual output of good art cannot be mathematically quantified. The scheme is highly limited: the entire field of potential applicants is the 250 members of Aosdána and those who apply for the cnuas are means-tested. The idea is that what artists do can and must be measured as if it were pig-iron production in a five-year plan. The cnuas itself is set at a specific level, currently €17,180 per annum. It was meant to be a way in which Ireland, recognising the immense benefits its artists give the nation, tries to ensure they can lead dignified lives. The current requirement to be a “full-time practising artist” will change: “It was agreed to no longer use this definition. Meanwhile, “sample audits would be undertaken annually to confirm the ‘productive practice’ of the artist”. They’re just irrelevant. The underlying mentality is exemplified by a ruling that artists who are “not advanced in years but who are temporarily incapacitated due to ill health and unable to engage in ‘productive practice’ during the course of …

Dennis Quaid’s dog day afternoon

And there’s a platform under the dog and two divers with him.   “My dad was a bit of frustrated actor as well,” says Quaid. My third cousin was Gene Autry. So nobody was more surprised than Quaid, when, last January, a horrific video emerged from the set of his adorable new family movie, A Dog’s Purpose. Someone had surreptitiously used their camera phone and spliced the material together. The film opened to a respectable $18.4 million, but shy of earlier box-office estimates. But by the time he was four he had a little video camera and was making up stories. He was never in danger. That really woke me. Months later, and Quaid is sitting in a London hotel, still shaking his head in disbelief. “I guess I always had that kind of brain,” says Quaid, who testified before the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, in 2008, asking US Congress not to pre-empt the right to sue drug manufacturers for negligence under state law. “That was an important part of the story. He still gets recognised on the street for these roles. The Texan-born actor Dennis Quaid is firmly in the canine camp on the matter of cat v dog. “He loved movies ad he was always doing shtick. Why wait until just before the premiere? Take aim. But I watched all of the footage that was shot that day with that dog.  The footage, which appeared on the entertainment site TMZ, purportedly showed a German Shepherd stunt dog being forced into water. Dennis Quaid and pooch in A Dog’s Porpose “Somebody edited that footage and then waited 10 months,” says Quaid. And that they happen all the time.” Quaid has long possessed a dormant scientific gene. In 2007, the two-week-old children of Quaid and wife Kimberly – twins Thomas Boone and Zoe Grace – were among three patients accidentally given 1,000 times the common dosage of a blood thinner at Los Angeles’ Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Like I tell all my kids. “Doc Holliday had tuberculous,” he says. “His mother is Meg Ryan, too,” smiles dad. I never encouraged or discouraged it. Not only that but when they did pull the dog out of the water, he ran around the other side and jumped back in again.  These days, he shares a homestead with Batman and Gidget, two French bulldogs. Do a crossword puzzle.” Like …

Burning Man: 10 guiding principles that could change the world

“It is an intersection between art and science, experiments and community, prototyping new ideas and experimenting with ways of governing people. “It frees people up and allows them to see themselves really differently. In 1995, there were 32 theme camps (“gatherings of people like a storefront in the city”); by 1997, there were 100. “It almost broke us.” The event’s infrastructure had to step up. “Everyone I met was really interesting, very diverse people, very artistic, but not so much in a traditional way but in odd ways: art through innovation, scientific experiment and art that was physical.” Flames on the horizon Dubois, who studied fine art, recalls one moment that shifted her attitude towards what art could be and how she could experience it. “It’s true that the fame of Burning Man has changed the awareness of others, so we’re getting different sorts of demographics; we always have,” says Dubois. “It was an underground art scene, billboard liberation front, parties, crazy fun stuff,” Dubois recalls, “and one of the things that came on our radar was Burning Man.” Everyone I met was really interesting, very diverse people, very artistic, but not so much in a traditional way but in odd ways The festival began as a summer solstice evening ritual with a dozen people on Baker Beach in San Francisco in 1986, led by Larry Harvey. “We’re all used to buying things and having transactional relationships, but with Burning Man, you’re taken outside that game and asked to be with people. Camps range from Christmas Camp to Camp Beaverton’s Burning Man Camp for Wayward Girls, as featured in the documentary Meet the Beavers (seriously, watch it.) An evolving event Dubois says Burning Man doesn’t consider itself to be a festival. The festival’s connection to what could broadly be described as the technology community began then. It does have an impact In recent years, there are plenty of tales of tech millionaires and billionaires making the pilgrimage from Silicon Valley to expand their minds on the playa, while simultaneously bringing the trappings of wealth – which doesn’t sound very freeing when you’re talking about million-dollar RVs. “That was difficult,” Dubois says. I never thought of that as artistic expression, but of course it is. Where those things start to overlap are the experiences.” Dubois is chief transition officer of the festival, the cofounder of Black Rock City and a founding …

Dara and Ed’s Road to Mandalay: see the sights, dodge the jokes

“A country doesn’t exist until you’ve told a joke in it,” says Byrne, like comic solipsist. TV producers seem to think so. Where’s the fun in that? “You don’t become a comedian without wanting to find quirky things in the cultures you visit.” Nobody could resent two such personable fellows for scouring the world for new material, but another reason might be to present unfamiliar views through the lens of an unusual relationship. “I hope me and Dara aren’t going to fall out,” ventures Ed. O’Briain regards Byrne, lost in his embroidered Kurta, and affirms, “I would be proud to attend any international karate tournament that you hosted on your evil island.” It’s the closest they allow themselves to come to a culturally inappropriate remark (which is not very) and also perhaps their funniest. “Well, so are we,” replies Ed, not insincerely.) But it’s more revealing that they translate new experiences into stand-up terms, each performing five minutes in a comedy club in the multicultural capital, later arsing around with the Lion Dance costumes like a pantomime horse in Genting Highlands, then turning their hands to shadow puppetry before an audience in Kota Bharu (and bombing). (“They’re really shy of new people,” the comedians are told. So far, there’s no chance of that. With a packed itinerary and a mild sense of awe, Dara and Ed make for sensitive presenters and endearing tourists, but not riveting guides. “There’s a reason they get comedians to do these kinds of journeys, because we’re actually quite curious anyway,” says O’Briain. During Dara and Ed’s Road to Mandalay (RTÉ One, Thursday, 10.15pm), a three-part travel show that conveys Dara O’Briain and Ed Byrne through South East Asia, the comedians briefly bolster their own credentials. With Steve Coogan and Rob Bryden sharing meals, trading celebrity impressions and edging closer to killing each other on The Trip to Spain, while Richard Ayoade takes reluctant city breaks with various celebrities in Travel Man, comics make for popular travel guides, dispensing information as part of a set up, landing their experiences along with a joke. “There’s nothing I enjoy more than telling Ed things,” says O’Briain of his earnest guidebook regurgitations. Dara and Ed are going to get on just fine with South East Asia, and each other. Finally they turn up for dinner in Penang in ceremonial garb that Tommy Cooper would have admired. What Dara and …

Ceremony marks centerary of US navy’s arrival in Cobh

She is studying at University College Cork. ‘Really special’ Joining Mr Forsyth and Port of Cork Chairman John Mullins in unveiling a plaque at the former Admiralty House was Commander Taussig’s great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Helmer. “The Lord Mayor, a man of good presence and apparently genial temperament, made a speech of welcome in which he laid stress on the close relationship between the Irish and [the] Americans. Unrestricted submarine warfare by the Germans was a huge threat and the sinking of the Lusitania and several other US merchant ships was on everyone’s minds,” he told those gathered for the ceremony at the former naval command. The arrival of six US destroyers into Cork Harbour 100 years ago, marking the US navy’s first involvement in the first World War, were remembered at a special ceremony in Cobh on Thursday. The first wave of US navy ships to arrive in Queenstown were six destroyers from the US Atlantic Fleet, Division Eight led by Commander Joseph K Taussig on board the USS Wadsworth and he recalled the experience in his war-time diary, Queenstown Patrol 1917. Centenary of Battle of Messines Ridge to be marked by UK-Irish ceremony Grave of Irishman killed during first World War identified First World War Irish sailors killed at Jutland remembered Commander Taussig recorded how all six ships in the flotilla, USS Wadsworth, USS Wainright, USS McDougal, USS Conyngham, USS Porter and USS Davis were escorted by the Royal Navy’s HMS Mary Rose to Roche’s Point where each ship picked up a Royal Navy pilot to guide them to their berth. He said that there was not a family in Ireland that was not connected to the United States by blood ties.” Those blood ties were to deepen with the arrival of more than 9,000 American sailors to Queenstown and other parts of Co Cork including Aghada, Glenbrook, Whitegate, Bere Island and Whiddy Islands in Bantry Bay. Deputy chief of mission at the US embassy, Tim Forsyth recalled the role played by the US navy after its first ships arrived in the town, then known as Queenstown, on May 4th, 1917 – less than a month after the US entered the war on the Allied side and almost two years after the sinking of the Lusitania off the Cork coast. “I only found out before I started at UCC in January about my great-grandfather’s links with Cobh – it’s really …

Colm Meaney berates media for focusing on McGuinness’s IRA past

He found them Views on Paisley Meaney said he “did not have a very positive view” of Dr Paisley for most of his life, viewing him as “a very difficult man”, but he said Timothy Spall’s portrayal in the film finally helped him understand where he was coming from. “Through Tim’s performance I had an insight into Paisley when he was talking about the martyrs on the stained-glass window in the church and in the middle of the scene a light went on in my head: ‘That’s where he was coming from, that’s what it was about,’ ” he said. “I would have loved and looked forward to Martin’s probably quite wry and humorous comments about the film.” Belfast-born director Nick Hamm said Mr McGuinness and Mr Paisley had “the most amazing friendship” and he had to make a film about it. Spall said he found researching Paisley “fascinating” and believed it was his duty to see everything from this “extraordinary” character’s point of view. “He didn’t create the circumstances he was born into or grew up in.” The Journey, which cost just under $5 million, was funded largely by IM Global but received £620,000 production and development funding from Northern Ireland Screen, which is funded through Stormont-run Invest NI. It will open at 35 cinemas across Ireland on Friday, May 5th, and will also be screened in Britain and elsewhere. Following premieres at the Venice and Toronto film festivals it was screened by the Belfast Film Festival at the Movie House on Thursday evening. From speaking to people who did know them, I think we got pretty close to it.” Hamm and Bateman are now working on “a devilish tale” about car maker John DeLorean, which will be filmed in the US. Writer Colin Bateman, from Co Down, said: “Nobody apart from their families knows what they were really like behind closed doors, so the challenge for me was to create an off-camera personality, and who knows how close I got to the truth? Speaking in Belfast ahead of the British and Irish premiere of The Journey, a fictionalised film exploring the relationship between the former first minister and DUP leader Ian Paisley and Mr McGuinness, Meaney said the focus should be on Mr McGuinness’s “work as a statesman” and not his IRA past. He also spoke of his sadness that Mr McGuinness had died in March. Actor Colm …

Kilkenny photographer Richard Mosse wins world-leading Prix Pictet prize

We are uneasily aware of the images’ troubling, invasive, surveillance nature, while prompted to deal with the humanity of those ghostly presences. Instead of employing it as an instrument of control and regulation, however, he set about subverting those uses, noting that it sees human beings as warm, biological traces rather than registering, say, skin colour. Established in 2008 by the Pictet Group, one of the largest private banks in Switzerland, the Prix Pictet, which is worth 100,000 Swiss Francs, has the overall theme of sustainability. Within that overall theme, a specific subject is nominated. Irish photographer Richard Mosse wins world’s leading photography award The camera sees heat, so people become glowing, perhaps ghostly presences, standing out against eerily dark spaces. Worldwide, 300 people nominate photographers for the award and a judging panel, currently numbering eight, selects a shortlist and a winner. Mosse intended that the technology should rehumanise the people it was, in a sense, designed to dehumanise, “the tens of millions of refugees and migrants (who) currently find themselves in limbo, excluded from participating or contributing to our modern societies.” In his previous work, Mosse had used Kodak Aerochrome, a discontinued infrared film, to create images in the conflict zone between the Congolese army and rebel factions in the country. For Heat Maps (commissioned by the Barbican Art Gallery, London and NGV Melbourne) he again turned to an unorthodox medium, acquiring an extreme tele military grade thermographic camera, designed for surveillance and effective up to 50 kilometers – it is regarded as a weapons system component and its export is governed by arms regulations. Mosse won for his project Heat Maps in which he used a thermographic camera, designed to monitor and control borders and other perimeters, to record images of camps and staging posts occupied by refugees and migrants. This year the subject is Space. Born in 1980, Mosse studied at Goldsmiths in London and at Yale University, where he completed an MFA in photography in 2008. He was chosen from a shortlist of twelve that included such formidable contenders as Germans Thomas Ruff, Beate Guetschow, Saskia Groneberg and Michael Wolf, Russians Pavel Wolbeg and Sergey Ponomarev, Bengali Munem Wasif, Canadian Benny Lam, Mandy Barker from the UK and, from Japan, Rinko Kawauchi and Sohei Nishino, whose extraordinary Diorama Maps have won him international acclaim. He represented Ireland at the Venice Biennale in 2013 with a video, …

Former Central Bank building to get protected structure status

Independent city councillor Mannix Flynn more than two years ago sought the protection for the building which was completed in 1978, saying the bank and plaza had “won the hearts of many Dubliners” and were an important part of Stephenson’s legacy. However, the council has said the security railings added to the building in 1998 and the commercial buildings immediately to the east do not merit protection. National importance In his assessment senior planner Paraic Fallon said the bank was of “national importance having architectural, historical and technical significance”. Protected-structure status comes with an obligation to preserve all parts of the building, including interiors, land around it and any other structures on that land. The listing of the building, which was recently sold by the bank to a US/Hong Kong investment consortium for €67 million, will severely restrict options for its redevelopment. Details emerge of ‘refreshing’ renovation of Central Bank space Hong Kong family backs Central Bank building buy Frank McDonald: Central Bank building should become a new library for Dublin The council’s planning department has recommended the bank and plaza, which includes Éamonn O’Doherty’s Crann an Óir sculpture, the golden ball towards the front of the plaza, should be added to the list. Few 20th-century buildings have been added to the protected structures list, and those that have are mostly from the earlier part of the century. The design and construction methods “displayed pioneering technical innovation” he said. Its eight storeys were built from the top down, with each floor suspended from two central shafts housing lifts and stairs, and Mr Fallon said it remained “the only suspended building in Ireland”. The former headquarters of the Central Bank on Dame Street in Dublin, designed by architect Sam Stephenson in the 1970s, is to be added to the city’s record of protected structures. US real-estate company Hines and Hong Kong firm Peterson Group are planning a top-floor bar and restaurant for the site.

3Arena criticised over viewing areas for people with disabilities

Wheelchair user Alannah Murray has criticised the 3Arena for the location of its viewing platforms for people with disabilities, after having her view blocked for the entire performance during a recent Bruno Mars concert. At the end of the day, I’m a paying patron.” In response to Murray’s letter, a 3Arena spokesperson said: “3Arena is sorry that some of our patrons who use wheelchairs did not enjoy the concert in question as much as they could have. The only accessible option is the allocated areas on the first floor.  What happened during the Bruno Mars concert won’t stop Murray from going to another event in the 3Arena but until the issue is resolved, it will be a concern for her whenever she returns. Unfortunately these repeated requests were not complied with. Photograph: 3Arena The wheelchair accessible viewing areas are located to the left and right of the stage, behind the first level of tiered seating. “The fact is that they say ‘you can go here or here’. “It’s made me worry about how it’s going to impede me the next time I want to go to something.” “I’d like to see them change where the wheelchair area is laid out,” she says. If people in the last few rows of the first level stand up to dance, which is to be expected during a live show, they immediately obstruct the view for those behind them, especially wheelchair users.  Murray doesn’t expect people to stop dancing during concerts but she says all paying customers, disabled or not, should get to experience the show equally. “I wouldn’t want to impede on anyone and I’ve done the rounds on radio shows and any backlash that I’m getting is that it’s just another ‘woe is me, I’m disabled’ story’. Murray wrote to The Irish Times about her experience at the venue for the April 20th concert. We recognise that this situation is extremely distressing and we continue to examine options to solve the problem.” The venue was renovated in 2008 and while the majority of its disabled facilities are up-to-date, Murray says that the viewing areas for wheelchair users are limited. I feel like there needs to be more available,” she says.  For health and safety purposes, wheelchair users are not allowed in the venue’s standing area. Her view during the concert was restricted due to people standing and dancing in the seating in …

The Green Carnation Prize 2016 shortlist: Best new gay fiction

It’s been difficult to narrow all the books down to five; it will be even harder to choose a winner.” Now in its seventh year, the prize, with the support of Foyles, seeks to champion the best writing by an LGBTQ author in the UK. Garth Greenwell’s What Belongs to You is a debut about an American expat struggling with his own complicated inheritance while navigating a foreign culture. He returns to Mitko again and again over the next few months, and their trysts grow increasingly intimate and unnerving as the enigma of this young man becomes inseparable from that of his homeland, Bulgaria, a country with a difficult past and an uncertain future. So to cloak their tales, Ruth tells her stories when Liska is at work, to a background of shrieking seabirds; Liska tells hers when Ruth is asleep, with the lighthouse sweeping its steady beam through the window. She sits on her porch, listening to the residents of Augustown go about their lives. Garth Greenwell lives in Iowa City, where he holds the Richard E. Augustown, Kei Miller (Weidenfeld & Nicolson) Ma Taffy is blind. In 2014, he won the prestigious Forward Prize for Poetry for his collection, The Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion. She is the author of a short story collection, The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales, and one novel, The Gracekeepers. She knows that a terrible thing has been done to him, and that it will have an irreversible effect on Augustown. It is also a song of south London, of working class families with hidden histories, of a bright and complex world long neglected. Author Biography Stella Duffy OBE has written thirteen novels, over fifty short stories, and ten plays. The Green Carnation Prize 2016 shortlist in full: London Lies Beneath, Stella Duffy (Virago) Based on a true story set in south London in 1912. Each passes the time by telling the baby stories, trying to pass on the lessons they’ve learned: tales of circuses and stargazing, selkie fishermen and domestic werewolves, child-eating witches and broken-toothed dragons. Author Biography Kirsty Logan is a writer, performer, literary editor, writing mentor and book reviewer. Soon they are on a journey that will alter both their lives and their community. This is not the Jamaica of white-sand beaches and swaying palms, but a poor, oppressed shanty town in the sweltering centre of the …

A schoolbook with a difference: one written by pupils

For this very reason, these stories are the purest form of writing you can find. In understanding this, one sees the beauty of the school anthology. It’s a great feeling to see the finished product of something you have worked hard to produce and it’s fulfilling to know that we are continuing the legacy of the Clonkeen Anthology. No one writes something they’re not particularly interested in unless they’re being paid for it, and since we’re not being paid, well, we have nothing to motivate us other than our own passions. People enjoy doing it and hopefully people will continue doing it, whether as a hobby or in a professional capacity, into their adult years. The Anthology gives us the freedom to write what we want but is also a place where we are guided through the process of structuring and editing our stories. You might be thinking how this applies to The Anthology. Or whether it has become something else, something more or better, or perhaps it is now a mere staple of Clonkeen’s academic year. The cover was designed by 3rd Year student, Roman Gyrin. Over the years it has showcased short stories, biographies, poetry, screenplays, extracts from dramas and artwork from students throughout the school – 1st Year to 6th to past pupils. It was the latter certainty that led to the establishment of Clonkeen College Press and the publication of our first Anthology in 2012. A book that I was involved in writing, editing and marketing. I never thought that I would be given the opportunity to work with an author and enhance my skills as a writer. It doesn’t have to appeal to a certain regime of rules either. It has a “take it or leave it” attitude. But I also think it is something more than that. What’s great about the creative writing class in Clonkeen is there is a genuine enthusiasm for writing. Its purpose is to show off how teenagers write, what they write about and, most importantly, to spark that creative flame within the student’s mind and unlock their creative potential. The project is a way of giving students confidence by putting their writing into a published book. If you read a few stories you’ll immediately be struck by the honesty and openness with which students write. They’re written exactly as they are intended to be. I’ve definitely realised my love …

Niall Horan drips all over his dirty laundry on new song ‘Slow Hands’

Then there’s our dear old Niall, like a wide-eyed boy blissed out on his J1 he’s trying out all kinds of American ‘things’. He’ll always be the Kian Egan of One Direction. There’s nothing to get too excited about, but I guess that’s probably the way Niall likes it, pleasantly anodyne, it’s the Abercrombie and Fitch of pop songs. Louis is somewhere waiting and plotting for the right time to launch his razzamatazz comeback like a showbiz veteran. It’s no radical departure, Niall hasn’t decided to go Gaga (he’s more likely to go full GAA-GAA) but it’s a step in a more Sheeran-style, crowd-pleasing direction. Whereas first single This Town was a folky affair, the kind of thing Mundy might have knocked out at 4am in a Whelan’s lock-in circa 1999, Slow Hands is something else altogether. Liam just had a baby with Cheryl Tweedy-Cole-Fernandez-Versini-Bonina-Brown who they chose to call Bear Payne. It’s John Mayeresque in its strumming simplicity and is a neat showcase for his smooth vocal stylings. Liam has his own problems. A gentle, foot-stomper about a lady with a magic touch, a lady who knows what she wants, she wants to get her hands all over Niall’s “dirty laundry” and not in a bringing your washing home on a Sunday way.  This isn’t Timberlake’s Sexy Back, it’s Horan’s Sweaty Back.  Niall is all about the more basic things in life – straightforward, meat-and-two veg tunes. Poll Zayn is a fully fledged member of the New Hollywood set, he’s a moodier edgier Nick Jonas, writing dark, harsh sub-Weeknd tracks about the genetically blessed sexy funtimes he’s having with Gigi Hadid. Let’s take stock of those One Direction boys shall we? Harry Styles lives in a patchouli-scented world populated by the right kind of movers and shakers, he’s getting avant garde, he’s getting woke, he’s sounding a bit like MGMT and wearing Mick Jagger’s old hair, he’s your secondary school boyf gone off to art college.