Oxford Dictionary has a new last word

The definition of “thing” has also been given a meaning makeover to include “a genuine or established phenomenon or practice” when used to express disbelief, as in: “How can that be a thing?” Also among the tranche of new words are 50 new terms relating to tennis, such as forced error, chip and charge and career slam. It takes the closing honour from “zythum”, an ancient Egyptian malt beer. “Tennis mom” and “tennis dad” – terms to describe parents who encourage their children to play the sport – have also been added to the book, which contains 829,000 words. The update features a number of politically charged new coinages, led by the 2016 word of the year “post-truth”, which has made its way into the latest update alongside “woke”, which was also shortlisted as a word of the year in 2016. Speaking about how a word qualifies for inclusion, the OED said: “We require several independent examples of the word being used, and also evidence that the word has been in use for a reasonable amount of time.” – (PA, Guardian Service) “Woke” has been popularised by the Black Lives Matter movement to signify “being alert to racial and social discrimination and injustice”. Zyzzyva is among a variety of new words to be added, which also include hygge, a Danish term described as “a quality of cosiness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being”. The Oxford English Dictionary has a new “last word” – “zyzzyva”, which is a genus of tropical weevil native to South America typically found in palm trees.

Ed Sheeran announces seven Irish concerts for 2018

That's not the end of the stadium tour, watch this space x— Ed Sheeran (@edsheeran) June 28, 2017 The announcement of new tour dates follows Sheeran’s headline slot on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury festival last Sunday, which saw the singer perform with just a guitar for company to a massive festival crowd. On this tour, any tickets that are resold will not be valid – this means no profit to touts and no one getting ripped off.” Concert goers are expected to bring tickets, booking confirmation and credit card, plus a valid form of ID. The last time Ed Sheeran performed in Ireland was in April this year, when he played two sold-out shows at the 3 Arena. A Bill that would see ticket touts fined up to €5,000 has already been presented to the Dáil by Sinn Fein TD Maurice Quinlivan. A statement by the promotions company said: “Ed and his team have a strict stance against anyone using secondary ticketing websites for profit. More than three million viewers tuned in to the BBC’s broadcast. Those who do not have all the requirements risk not being admitted. Ed Sheeran tour dates Fri May 4th and Sat 5th: Páirc Uí Chaoimh, Cork Wed May 9th: Boucher Road Playing Fields, Belfast Sat May 12th and Sun May 13th: Pearse Stadium, Galway Wed May 16th and Fri May 18th: Phoenix Park, Dublin Resold tickets will only be valid if sold through the website Twicket, which are the official resale partner. Here are the dates for the European stadium tour, tickets on sale Saturday 8th of July – https://atlanti.cr/euuk2018tour A post shared by Ed Sheeran (@teddysphotos) on Jun 28, 2017 at 1:35am PDT Galway’s Pearse Stadium on May 12th and 13th, is his next stop, followed by Phoenix Park Dublin on 16th and 18th May. Starting off at Páirc Uí Chaoimh on May 4th and 5th, Sheeran then travels to Boucher Road Playing Fields in Belfast on May 9th. He will play also play concerts in Cork, Galway and Belfast. Ed Sheeran at 3Arena: This is pop without the chewing gum snaps and rehab receipts I’m slightly proud that I don’t get Ed Sheeran Saoirse Ronan to star in Ed Sheeran ‘Galway Girl’ video All tickets go on sale on Saturday 8th July at 9am at www.ticketmaster.ie and all other outlets nationwide. The announcement of the concerts came with a warning …

Paddington Bear creator Michael Bond dies, aged 91

The books went on to inspire toys, TV programmes and most recently the movie, Paddington, with a second fdue out later this year. In his long and illustrious career he published over 200 books for children. More than 35 million Paddington books have been sold worldwide and enjoyed by generations of children. He was a wonderful man and leaves behind one of the great literary legacies of our time.” The latest Paddington novel, Paddington’s Finest Hour, was published in April by HarperCollins. Michael Bond, the creator of one of Britain’s best-loved children’s characters, Paddington, died at home yesterday aged 91 following a short illness. A giant of children’s literature, his first book A Bear Called Paddington was published in 1958. My thoughts and love are with his wife Sue and his children Karen and Anthony.” Charlie Redmayne, HarperCollins CEO, said: “Michael Bond was one of the great children’s writers and at HarperCollins we are immensely fortunate to have published him and to have known him. As well as Paddington, he also created characters including Olga da Polga and A Mouse Called Thursday along with a series of adult novels, featuring the detective Monsieur Pamplemousse. He will be forever remembered for his creation of the iconic Paddington, with his duffle coat and wellington boots, which touched my own heart as a child and will live on in the hearts of future generations. Ann-Janine Murtagh, executive publisher HarperCollins Children’s Books, said: “I feel privileged to have been Michael Bond’s publisher – he was a true gentleman, a bon viveur, the most entertaining company and the most enchanting of writers.

The 10 best films of 2017 so far

It’s a cat video. TONI ERDMANN Maren Ade surged forwards after a few under-appreciated dramas to deliver a family comedy that somehow managed to justify its near-epic length. ELLE One critic described Paul Verhoeven’s troubling rape drama as “the most surprisingly un-booed film” of Cannes 2016. We will, however, note that identifying whether CHiPs or Baywatch was the more abysmal TV adaptation is a real angels-on- the-head-of-a-pin conundrum. Oh yes. But the MVP is surely Mica Levi’s abstract score. I’m not joking. That’s right. GET OUT Another critical smash from way out of left field. An extraordinarily disciplined teasing out of the racial tensions that coloured the 1960s.  I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO Gripping, furious documentary on the deaths of three black activists – Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr – told from the perspective of the writer James Baldwin. The eventual best picture winner, Moonlight, is there. Sônia Braga offers one of the great cinematic portrayals of late-life stubbornness. The envelope mix-up distracted from the fact that Moonlight’s victory at the Oscars was one of the greatest upsets in the awards’ history. Jordan Peele’s satirical horror film sends a young black man into a terrifying version of the suburban white plutocracy. Sandra Hüller is the long-suffering daughter. But two of the big players, Manchester by the Sea and La La Land, just failed to make the final list. hang on. Peter Simonischek is the embarrassing dad. Like everybody else, we knock together a list of the 10 best films in the first half of the year. The Irish Times wouldn’t lower itself. La La Land is the winner. We somehow retain sympathy for an anti-hero who does terrible things. There are horrors in here. There are definitely uncomfortable turns here, but Isabelle Huppert’s Oscar-nominated performance is impeccable. Florence Pugh is a typhoon of righteous fury in this windy, Northumbrian adaptation of Nikolai Leskov’s Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District. Give it a while and we’ll be compiling these things on an hourly basis. It will be argued over for decades. AQUARIUS Kleber Mendonça Filho’s sprawling drama concerns an aging music writer bravely resisting efforts to knock down her beachside apartment. Possibly both the best horror film and the best comedy of the year. I’ve opened the wrong envelope. LADY MACBETH Now that’s what you call momentum. Actually, I am. MOONLIGHT A searing, poetic meditation on gay and …

How rock’n’roll was brought back to life in New York City

Like all great oral histories, Meet Me In the Bathroom is a wild read because you’re getting the opinions and recollections of some colourful characters – not all of them remembering it in quite the same way. As oral histories go, this is one of the very best. Their debut album Is This It was a gritty, exhilarating call to arms, and suddenly, the uniform of leather jacket, skinny jeans and Converse runners became ubiquitous. Every scene needs a chronicler like Lizzy Goodman. You may not have been there, but you get the lowdown on the early DFA sessions, watch the Yeah Yeah Yeahs come together and witness The Strokes take off. Aside from the bands and musicians, we hear from the bartenders, DJs, journalists, promoters, label reps, models, groupies, bloggers and assorted hanger-ons who made up the scene. There are passages which delve into the emergence of music blogs and their effect on new acts, the gentrification of Brooklyn, and how the indie rock scene was used by major label bands such as Kings of Leon and The Killers. Aside from tales of the rise and fall of various acts, Goodman is excellent when it comes to drawing out the context and cultural shifts of the time. It was The Strokes who changed everything. We hear about the effect of drink and drug abuse on The Strokes as they struggled to cope with early fame. As a vivid, candid, compelling and beautifully rendered account of what New York was like before it became the city it is today, Meet Me In the Bathroom strikes all the right notes. Fast-forward to 2017 and Meet Me In the Bathroom: Rebirth & Rock & Roll In New York City 2001-2011 is a meaty oral history of those fascinating years when New York was once again the centre of the musical universe. There’s Irish interest in the shape of Dominique Keegan (from Plant Records and the Plant bar), Marcus ‘Shit Robot’ Lambkin and David Holmes, all of whom played roles in the formation of that label. There’s some fantastic observations and colour – for example, James Murphy having to get permission from his therapist to try ecstasy for the first time. We see how the likes of Conor Oberst, The National, Vampire Weekend and Ryan Adams became part of the fabric. Radiohead: OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997-2017 – Paranoid androids reanimated Body & Soul: …

D-Light Studios: opening up Dublin’s northside to live music and cultural events

“Whatever we make, we put back into the building and that’s not good enough.” Open up Instead of struggling, they decided to open up the building to more artists so more people can see its potential. The shuttering of creative spaces (which is also echoed in Cork at the moment) is all too commonplace, as developer needs are prioritised over the cultural needs of our cities. “Economically, it’s why we’re here because nobody would have taken this building.” The maintenance of the building kept the team occupied. “A lot of places have closed. Not being familiar with the area, she couldn’t believe it wasn’t already snapped up.  How rock’n’roll was brought back to life in New York City Here are our favourite Irish tracks right now Justin Bieber at the RDS: all you need to know “It was used as a garage,” says Stoinska. “When Nama took it over a few years ago, an old Woollen Mills near Sheriff St wasn’t that attractive to sell so they focused on other properties of a greater value,” says Gill. South Studios, Block T, Mabos, The Joinery, Moxie Studios and Monster Truck Gallery are just six spaces that Dublin city’s arts and culture community has lost as places for art to be created, facilitated, programmed and witnessed in the last few years. Applications are open until July 14th and the winning application will get to use a studio in the building for free for six months. Salam was formerly involved in Block T, which helped Smithfield become known as a more cultural and artistic hub, before their original building was sold and they moved to Dublin 8. Having seen all those other spaces close and having spent nearly nine years “patching and fixing” the building, Agata Stoinska and Stace Gill, director and creative director respectively, decided to put the building to more use.  “It’s expensive to keep a place maintained,” says Stoinska. Running a space for arts and culture requires meeting building and fire regulations, health and safety, and those things require the capital that most arts organisations don’t have access to. That felt a little bit special because he chose the space that I have been breaking my heart over for nine years, and it was streaming to the whole world. Live music While D-Light houses a dance studio, a recording space, a web design and development company, a fashion magazine, a …

‘How has life led me to this moment?’: Creativity in Jennifer Johnston

But how? The Christmas Tree presents the creative process as involving awareness, finding a voice, and exposure, while The Illusionist sets side by side two artist figures and two modes of engagement with the power of art and words: the male illusionist who uses his power in a secretive, seductive and manipulative way; and his wife, who needs to disentangle herself from his authoritarian power so as to become a fiction writer who discloses her “bag of tricks” before her readers. Death and violence prompt the need to look at life anew precisely because they threaten life, disrupt meaning, and force a shift in perception. Her Hamletian musings encapsulate the questions that percolate through Jennifer Johnston’s 19 novels to date: faced with violence and/or death, be it natural or human-inflicted, the underlying question is not why we die, but how we live – which includes how we die. This creative process entails but is not confined to the artist’s experience, and requires the shift in perspective that features centrally in Johnston’s novels. (1974), anticipates later Irish works on the problematic memory of the first World War, from Frank McGuinness’s play Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme (1986) to Sebastian Barry’s novel A Long Long Way (2005). In a world in which technology allows us to disseminate words at an unprecedented speed and scale, it is no less apt that Johnston’s readers, in Ireland and abroad, in English and in translation, be reminded of the uses and misuses of words, and of how, like any power, they can be used “like missiles or roses”. As Johnston’s young male protagonists indicate, and indeed older male characters in later novels corroborate, in a patriarchal state of affairs becoming a person is hardly a given for either men or women. Indeed, as Stella puts it in her letter to her publisher, “a novel comes in many shapes and forms. If anything, the struggle to become an artist may illuminate the challenge faced by individuals and communities to develop a judicious awareness of inherited legacies combined with a commitment to become active rather than purely reactive citizens. Adoption means learning to love a stranger Jennifer Johnston: a Big House guide, full of compassion but free of illusions Harry Potter turns 20, 450 million copies later Both in The Captains and the Kings and in How Many Miles to Babylon?   Dr Teresa …