Daniel Day-Lewis in surprise retirement from acting

Speculation concerning the announcement will meander around the information that Sir Daniel had his 60th birthday in April. He learned to live off the land when shooting Michael Mann’s The Last of the Mohicans. Carrie Fisher had cocaine in her system before her death Carrie Fisher’s death due to ‘sleep apnoea and other causes’ He has always had an uneasy relationship with the art. There’s a position open there for Sir Daniel. We’re joking, of course. (He would also pass out Walter Brennan and Jack Nicholson, who, with best supporting awards on their shelf, tie his record for most male acting Oscars.) The most popular film of 2016 in Ireland was… They married in 1996 and have been part of the Wicklow furniture ever since. Day-Lewis’s second Oscar was for Anderson’s There Will be Blood in 2007. Since breaking through with Stephen Frears’s My Beautiful Laundrette in 1985, he has appeared in such films as Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence, Philip Kaufman’s The Unbearable Lightness of Being and Nicholas Hytner’s The Crucible. If Day-Lewis does stay away from acting, as suggested, then his last film will be Paul Thomas Anderson’s upcoming Phantom Thread. ‘People think I’m mad’ “Perhaps it’s my own fault, though, because if I don’t talk about it, others do so on my behalf and Chinese whispers begin. Sir Daniel Day-Lewis is to retire from acting, it has been announced. Day-Lewis is, however, capable of laughing at his own reputation for dangerous commitment. The surprising news came in a statement to Variety magazine from his representative, Leslee Dart. It was while working on that last version of Arthur Miller’s play that he became close to the author’s daughter, Rebecca Miller. It was suggested that the pressure of playing opposite the title character’s ghost stirred up memories of his own father, the former Poet Laureate Cecil Day-Lewis. He has yet to return to the stage. Holder of a British and an Irish passport (Cecil Day-Lewis was born in Co Laois), Sir Daniel has always been cautious in selecting his roles. By the time of There Will be Blood, he had become a little more relaxed in his approach. “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor,” the announcement read. One can hardly imagine a more dramatic way of leaving the limelight than by breaking his own record. “This is a private decision and neither he nor …

Daniel Day-Lewis announces retirement from acting

“He is immensely grateful to all of his collaborators and audiences over the many years.” The most popular film of 2016 in Ireland was… He previously won Academy Awards for My Left Foot (1989) and There Will Be Blood (2007) and was nominated for Gangs of New York (2002). Three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis is retiring from acting, his spokeswoman said on Tuesday, ending a storied movie career that included performances in films such as Lincoln and Gangs of New York. “Daniel Day-Lewis will no longer be working as an actor,” his publicist, Leslee Dart, said in a statement. Reuters Day-Lewis, who turned 60 in April, has one more movie in the works – Phantom Thread, which is set in the 1950s in London’s fashion world and is due to be released in December. Day-Lewis, who was born in Britain and holds dual Anglo-Irish citizenship, won his third best actor Oscar in 2013 for playing US president Abraham Lincoln in Lincoln. Carrie Fisher had cocaine in her system before her death Carrie Fisher’s death due to ‘sleep apnoea and other causes’ The statement said there would be no further comment. Day-Lewis, the only man to have won three best actor Oscars, gave no reason for his decision, calling it private.

Boxing Day, a short story by David Park

The marks were no longer red as they must once have been and were now scabbed over and dulled but they were there all the same. It was quiet now even though on the other side of the road the sea’s low moan was a constant presence. ‘Must be the weather,’ he said. Going to the fireplace I took the framed photograph and nestled it in my coat pocket beside the magnifying glass then closed the door as quietly as I had opened it. She made a snuffling noise then went on sleeping in her curiously childlike position with her head resting on the pillow of her hands that were clasped as if in prayer. ‘It won’t be fine. There had been much talk of snow but it didn’t look as if it would come to anything and as we drove towards the coast, although it was very cold, the sky seemed untroubled and layered only with a thin wash of brightness. This is taken from David Park’s latest collection of short stories, Gods & Angels, out no win paperback from Bloomsbury. Then she stood up suddenly and went to the kitchen, returning with a piece of chocolate cake on a saucer and a glass of cordial. ‘What would they have smuggled?’ ‘I’m not really sure. But I put up the reindeer in honour of you coming. Some days the wind’s so strong it feels like it’s blowing all your cobwebs away. It was a nice object with a prism about the size of my palm and a black ebony handle. I’d help my mother decorate the tree and she was good at things like that. My last time. I pretended I had walked to the end of the road to meet him and made a show of buttoning my coat. When she hugged me I felt myself trampolining against her ample body and as I’d bounce away I was always conscious of her scent that was a mixture of something sweet and the antiseptic smell of a hospital. On the drive home he cried – it was the only time I have ever seen him do this and he stopped as soon as he saw me looking at him, then in an attempt at mutual consolation we went to McDonald’s and had a Happy Meal. ‘That’s doing my head in, Robbie,’ my father said and he shuffled through his …

‘When shall I see my home again?’ The direct provision poets

“I think it’s important, in any collaboration, that you don’t just parachute yourself in and say ‘right, now we’re going to do an art project’,” Emoe says. Saida Umar’s Bhalwal, Pakistan, for example, conjures up the colour and struggle and joy of life in that city: Through an open door people see the potter in his courtyard working on his wheel Massi, the woman tending the Tandoor oven in the street Ching-chi rickshaws everywhere Ice-cream sellers and fruit sellers on their bikes Collecting sacks of old dry bread for money Ducks in the canal Azan, the call to prayer And it also allows for deeper resonances to be conveyed, for example the last lines of Funeral Ceremony, Cameroon, by Marie Claire Mundi Njong, have a poignant ring: Everybody is leaving The women carrying empty baskets on their heads The men carrying off their empty calabash singing native songs and English songs “Home again, home again, when shall I see my home again…” Only one poem, War Child, by Jean Marie Rukundo Phillemon, from Rwanda, deals directly with the experience of oppression and torture shared by many of those who are seeking asylum. It also gave the members the idea for the name of their group. The Plurality of Existence in the Infinite Expanse of Space and Time will be launched by Senator Alice Mary Higgins in Pearse Street Library on June 20th at 6.30pm and will available at public libraries from June 20th The title of the project and the anthology, meanwhile, The Plurality of Existence in the Infinite Expanse of Space and Time, is a direct reference to French philosopher Jacques Rancière’s reflections on Louis Auguste Blanqui’s Eternity by the Stars, written in 1872, a Utopian text that embraces difference, proposing that the organisation of society be based according to the laws of the natural world as opposed to any sort of imposed political regime. While gardening in Spirasi, the group found a crocosmia bulb and learned that the Montbretia is native to the grasslands of Southern and Eastern Africa. As well as our shared human experiences, the collection also, inevitably, reveals some of the cultural differences, particularly with regard to gender equality, such as Peter Rukundo’s To Cut Brooms, which deals with a “genital modification” initiation rite undergone by young girls between 10 and 13 in Rwanda. On June 20th a book will be launched that is unique …

Still standing: Elton John plays his 23rd Irish concert tonight

The number 202 from the city centre to Blackrock runs close to the venue. Doors are at 6.30pm and note that there is no support act. What about security? Live at the Marquee is situated on Monahan Road and it’s approximately a 30-minute walk from the city centre or a short taxi ride. – years of his career so expect plenty of razzle dazzle. There is also a paid car park close by as well as plenty of street parking in the area.   What’s the weather forecast? Patrons will be patted down upon entry and backpacks or large bags are not permitted inside the Marquee.   What is he likely to play? This is a sold out show with tickets going for €70/€95.  He is treating this tour as a thank you to all of his fans who have followed him for the last 54  – 54! Named after his latest album, the Cork leg of Wonderful Crazy Night tour is set to be a very special night looking back on some of his finest work to date. Elton John is bringing his Wonderful Crazy Night tour to Live at the Marquee at Cork this Tuesday, making it his fourth time to play this summertime venue just outside Cork city and his 23rd time to play in Ireland since playing the National Stadium in Dublin in 1979. Nope.  Are tickets still available? You can keep your eyes glued to #ticketfairy on Twitter but with a superstar act like Elton John, people generally want to hold onto their tickets.   What time does everything kick off? Elton and his band are expected on stage at 8pm.  How do I get there? Here’s a setlist from Ipswich Town Football Stadium, June 17th, 2017: The Bitch Is Back Bennie and the Jets I Guess That’s Why They Call It the Blues Take Me to the Pilot Daniel Looking Up A Good Heart Philadelphia Freedom (Elton John Band song) I Want Love Tiny Dancer Levon Rocket Man (I Think It’s Going to Be a Long, Long Time) Have Mercy on the Criminal Your Song Burn Down the Mission Sad Songs (Say So Much) Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me I’m Still Standing Crocodile Rock Your Sister Can’t Twist (But She Can Rock ‘n Roll) Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting Encore: Candle in the Wind   The Marquee is, indeed, a marquee so it will …

Live music belongs indoors, so let’s leave the festival fields to the cows

There may be a big fat fee to be earned as they tour from field to field, but is it really worth the downside? The main live music action won’t return indoors until the leaves start to fall, so acts don’t really have many options if they’re touring over the summer. For many acts – and even fans who realise that music sounds better indoors – this can’t come too soon. “The amount of sound spillage from the stage next to us meant I could sometimes hear the other band better than my own,” according to the guitarist with a long-established Irish act. Naturally, I can’t use the names behind the above quotes because the acts know what side their bread is buttered on. As far as many artists are concerned, festival season is actually quite miserable. Bands didn’t spend all their time learning their craft and creating their music to just be the backdrop for Louise, Dave and their pals from accounts to take tacky selfies. There are few acts who can afford to say no when the festival bookers call, especially as festivals have largely taken over the summer circuit. Be it Body & Soul here or Glastonbury across the water, thousands of people will spend the weekend showing their standard of festival fitness in the open air. It’s also clear that the finances don’t always stack up: this year’s high profile clangers such as Fyre in the Bahamas and Pemberton in Canada show that putting on a festival is not always a shortcut to printing money. They will watch bands, hang with their mates and, inevitably, head back to their tents to loudly sing Ed Sheeran songs until the wee small hours. Modern gigonomics means that the major promoters have gone festival crazy because they know they can make good money when things go right. Those who are serious about what they do want to play proper venues with proper infrastructures and where proper care is paid to their sound and lighting requirements. It’s festival season and that’s good news for many people. “I’m fairly sure no one had any idea who we were,” said the lead singer of a band fairly high up the main stage bill of a major Irish festival. For one coterie of people, though, festival season is not good news, but you rarely hear them expressing this sentiment. They have to bite …

Maud Gonne, bathing-suits and striptease culture

And why the underrepresentation of women in sport by the mass media? She specifically analysed the writer Eimear McBride and the idea of women and identity in her work. The jam-packed two days facilitated 12 panels on topics ranging from sports and leisurewear to porn, sex, sex education and women and ageing. For the first time in a long time we had research being presented on all aspects of women across a broad range of disciplines. National and international speakers gathered over the two-day event to discuss and share research that is being carried out on the role, representation and perception of women within Ireland. This discussion highlighted the prejudice endured by women in all aspects of life. Dr Clare Gorman is a lecturer in the School of Humanities at Waterford Institute of Technology @ClareGorman4 Waterford Institute of Technology hosted the first ever Women On Ireland Research Network interdisciplinary conference earlier this month. The issue of gender within culinary arts was discussed. The two days concluded with a zestful and spirited round-table discussion which looked at women in academia and beyond. The serious question of girls being oversexualised was raised. Lastly, Dr Mary Condren (Trinity College Dublin) finished the keynotes by discussing why women are either depicted as angels or sinister temptresses within mythologies. Dr Máire Leane (University College Cork) gave a fascinating paper on the representation of adolescent female sexuality in Ireland. Prof Ann Fogarty (University College Dublin) looked at contemporary Irish women’s writing. The writer Evelyn Conlon shared some humorous stories from her collection Telling, published by Books Upstairs. Each paper was “rocking the system”, “shaking the status quo” and identifying the challenges faced by women. Plus, two important questions were raised – why is there such a small proportion of women involved in science? Prof Louise Ryan (University of Sheffield), gave a brilliant keynote on stories of Irish migrants to London and the factors that cause people to leave Ireland in the first place. It inspired us all that fighting supervillains is easy but fighting misogyny is the real challenge.

Elton John at the Marquee: Everything you need to know

Patrons will be patted down upon entry and backpacks or large bags are not permitted inside the Marquee.   What is he likely to play? The Marquee is, indeed, a marquee so it will be sheltered from direct sunlight.  Are tickets still available? You can keep your eyes glued to #ticketfairy on Twitter but with a superstar act like Elton John, people generally want to hold onto their tickets.   What time does everything kick off? Here’s a setlist from Ipswich Town Football Stadium, June 17th, 2017: The Bitch Is Back Bennie and the Jets I Guess That’s Why They Call It the Blues Take Me to the Pilot Daniel Looking Up A Good Heart Philadelphia Freedom (Elton John Band song) I Want Love Tiny Dancer Levon Rocket Man (I Think It’s Going to Be a Long, Long Time) Have Mercy on the Criminal Your Song Burn Down the Mission Sad Songs (Say So Much) Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me I’m Still Standing Crocodile Rock Your Sister Can’t Twist (But She Can Rock ‘n Roll) Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting Encore: Candle in the Wind      So warm up your lungs as the legend walks you through all of the stand out hits, including Bennie and the Jets, I Guess That’s Why They Call it the Blues, Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on Me and I’m Still Standing. Elton John is bringing his Wonderful Crazy Night tour to Live at the Marquee at Cork this Tuesday, making it his fourth time to play this summertime venue just outside Cork city and his 23rd time to play in Ireland since playing the National Stadium in Dublin in 1979. This is a sold out show with tickets going for €70/€95. Nope. – years of his career so expect plenty of razzle dazzle.  He is treating this tour as a thank you to all of his fans who have followed him for the last 54  – 54! Named after his latest album, the Cork leg of Wonderful Crazy Night tour is set to be a very special night looking back on some of his finest work to date. Temperatures are expected to reach 22 degrees in Cork city on Tuesday evening. Elton and his band are expected on stage at 8pm.  How do I get there? What about security? Live at the Marquee is situated on Monahan Road and it’s approximately …

Justin Bieber at the RDS: all you need to know

Baby Purpose Encore: Sorry The closest Dart stations are Lansdowne Station and Sandymount Station and they are approximately a five-minute walk to the RDS.  What about security? Be wary of fake tickets circulating. Aiken Promotions advise people not to buy tickets from any unofficial source or third party site as they may not be genuine and you run the risk of being denied access to the show. This summer the Canadian superstar lent his voice to one of the biggest hits of the summer, Luis Fonsi’s Despacito. There is limited parking available at the RDS and its surrounding areas. What time does it kick off? This is a very sold out event. Patrons will be patted down on arrival and backpacks and large handbags are not permitted inside the venue.  What’s he likely to play? Support comes from American singer Halsey whose voice you might recognise from Closer, her collaboration with The Chainsmokers. The Dublin Bus routes to RDS Ballsbridge leave from from Nassau Street outside Trinity College and you can get the 4, 7, 18, 8 and 27x. He grew out his bangs and ditched the boyish charm but spat out pop bangers like What Do You Mean?, Sorry and Where Are ü Now as if they were going out of fashion. The 23-year-old has been on the road since March 2016 so that explains why you probably thought he was keeping the head down and easing off making headlines like “Justin Bieber’s egg-throwing victim reportedly ‘suing for $1m’ for damage to his reputation as car dealer”. Just don’t expect him to know all of his lines in Spanish.   Are tickets still available? Here’s a setlist from his recent show at Stade de Suisse in Switzerland last Thursday. Young rapscallion Justin Bieber is making his way to the RDS on Wednesday as part of The Purpose World Tour. Very. He’s been mixing up his setlists every so slightly but this is the general gist.  Mark My Words Where Are ü Now (Jack ü cover) Get Used to It I’ll Show You The Feeling Boyfriend Cold Water (Major Lazer cover) Love Yourself Been You Company No Sense Hold Tight No Pressure As Long As You Love Me Children Let Me Love You (DJ Snake cover) Life Is Worth Living What Do You Mean? She’s on at 7pm and the Biebz is due onstage at 8.15pm.  How do I get there? …

Poems from the edge

As well as our shared human experiences, the collection also, inevitably, reveals some of the cultural differences, particularly with regard to gender equality, such as Peter Rukundo’s To Cut Brooms, which deals with a “genital modification” initiation rite undergone by young girls between 10 and 13 in Rwanda. “And I wanted to learn about what that’s like as a human experience.” “I also wanted to draw attention to direct provision, in an implicit way. As you would expect, it’s a rich and varied collection, with writers from Cameroon, Croatia, Pakistan, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. “I think it’s important, in any collaboration, that you don’t just parachute yourself in and say ‘right, now we’re going to do an art project’,” Emoe says. “In a way, people living in direct provision, are also in a kind of in-between state, constantly,” she says. No doubt we will hear more voices as time goes on. The project consisted of a series of site-specific audio works that were transmitted on the River Liffey, Dublin; the River Lee, Cork; the River Corrib, Galway; and the River Barrow, Carlow and a series of text-based works that were exhibited in Carlow’s Visual, Centre for Contemporary Art. Gardening was a way for her to get to know people there and it allowed the group to work together as equals. The Plurality of Existence in the Infinite Expanse of Space and Time presents voices of people who are not represented, on a political, cultural or social level. She is interested, too, in what she calls liminal or “in between” spaces. Marie Claire Mundi Njong Jean Marie and Peter Rukundo The gardening project led on to the writing project. For a previous project, The Things We See, Emoe worked with Taiwanese artist Chang Wen Hsan. Both compiled a list of 70 objects from their daily lives and, in an installation, a computerised voice read the list compiled by Emoe in English and the list compiled by Wen Hsan in Chinese (with a Taiwanese accent). Saida Umar’s Bhalwal, Pakistan, for example, conjures up the colour and struggle and joy of life in that city: Through an open door people see the potter in his courtyard working on his wheel Massi, the woman tending the Tandoor oven in the street Ching-chi rickshaws everywhere Ice-cream sellers and fruit sellers on their bikes Collecting sacks of old dry bread for money Ducks in the canal …

Women in Irish theatre: no more waiting in the wings

Lisa Tierney-Keogh. And much of the contemporary work spoken about by scholars such as Kate McCarthy, Ciara Murphy and Brenda O’Connell is devised or collaborative, eschewing hierarchies altogether. It was Gregory who, in her more than 40 plays, experimented with absurdist forms and subversive humour, who pioneered the act of waiting as dramatic device in The Gael Gate. Much of the evidence that Sihra presents has long been hidden in plain sight, obscured not because we did not know it but because we were taught not to see it. Susanne Day. These are just some of the Irish women playwrights whose names were up for grabs, printed on placards for a photo op at the recent Irish Women Playwrights and Theatremakers conference. Margaretta D’Arcy. Organised by Dr David Clare, Dr Fiona McDonagh and Aideen Wylde and hosted by the Department of Drama & Theatre Studies at Limerick’s Mary Immaculate College, the conference brought together theatre makers, scholars and activists to discuss the work of women in Irish theatre. Speaking on the Theatremaker’s Roundtable, playwright Lynda Radley described flying from Scotland for a meeting with the Abbey Theatre. To have two papers on the plays of Mary Manning and an entire panel dedicated to the work of Teresa Deevy was a luxury not often enjoyed by those studying women playwrights, who are often limited to plot summaries for an unfamiliar audience. Sarah-Jane Scaife highlighted the bullying and discrimination faced by those who, before #WakingTheFeminists, were brave enough to speak out in male-dominated rehearsal rooms and production meetings. Mary Elizabeth Burke-Kennedy. The transgressive is misinterpreted as messy, the purposeful assumed to be a mistake, and failure to conform to a masculine aesthetics is seen simply as failure. Elaine Murphy. Mary Davys. Intersectional approaches moved the conversation beyond gender to address race, disability, language, age, region and geography. Nicola McCartney. Dr Clare pointed out how Mary Balfour’s 1814 play Kathleen O’Neil acts as prototype for many of the tropes that would become Irish melodrama – yet it is Boucicault that is trotted out every year. As Dr Charlotte McIvor argued, Irish theatre and Ireland itself “should always be already defined as the diverse potential constituency they have become”. Rosemary Jenkinson. Anne Devlin. But most extraordinary, perhaps, for illuminating how women in Irish theatre have been so completely and violently erased. Archives reveal telling traces of women’s work made invisible (as seen in Tricia …

The most popular film of 2016 in Ireland was . . .

Sociologists have long pondered Ireland’s affection for the cinema. We have 104 screens per million inhabitants. When film journalists are stuck for something to say about the domestic industry they tend to nervously suggest that Irish people enjoy the cinema more than any other nation. The baffling European popularity of the useless Ice Age cartoons continues with the latest episode scoring top place in Bulgaria and Croatia. A mere three percent of total takings went towards the likes of Room and The Young Offenders. This is well up on the European average of just 1.6 visits. That picture was way ahead with €4.1 million. Now that’s an industry. In that nation, an astonishing 51 percent was soaked up by domestic titles. The 2017 report from UNIC (Union Internationale des Cinémas) has been published and it confirms that last year Ireland had the joint highest per capita cinema attendance in Europe. This newspaper is not at home to cultural stereotyping. The French forked out 35 percent on films concerning Madame Mercier’s adventures au bord de la mer (or whatever). That’s still classy, mind you. If you’re living at home and you want to get into a darkened space for two hours then the local Enormoplex remains an attractive option. The Irish and the French tie with an average of 3.3 visits per year. Family films always do well and, with €3.5 million in receipts, Finding Dory came a respectable second. The French come second with 90 screens. The United Kingdom scored decently with 2.6 visits. Such people are being overlooked by a mainstream that aims most big-budget films at teenage comic-book fans and science-fiction geeks. Not necessarily. The Secret Life of Pets and The Jungle Book were right behind. Rejoice. Local titles bossed the charts in quite a few countries: The Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, Norway, Turkey. But the top 10 for 2016 offers some interesting lessons. First, if you want to succeed in Ireland, it’s worth your while making a half-decent film. There are two lessons worth heeding here. Indeed, family films are still the most common winners. But that film unquestionably picked up more traffic from middle-aged women than most other films in the top 10. But so it proved. To put this turn-up in perspective, consider that the third film in Helen Fielding’s singleton saga was only the 39th highest grossing film worldwide. Helped by some script tweaking …

‘A swell is simply radiating energy from an event across the horizon’

There is. We find him living in Ireland in the late 1980s, writing that most iconically Australian of novels, Cloudstreet. “It’s transmitted in the genes. It just shows how special Australia is. He didn’t pass anything worth a pinch of shit. That stuff doesn’t go away. Like Hannia Wintoni, perhaps. “That was a funny thing to happen. “It just shows you what’s out there. His father’s rifle The title essay paints a disturbing picture of Winton’s 12-year-old self, standing behind the curtain of their house, aiming his father’s rifle at strangers in the street. It’s a pretty little fish.” Joking aside, this unusual tribute actually says a lot about Winton. “A swell is simply radiating energy from an event across the horizon – it’s generated by something that’s already in the past. “If ever there was a generation that had a right to be angry, it’s people who have inherited the mess that we’ve made: financially, socially, in terms of policy and, above all, ecologically.” Is there anything to be said, after all that? “Sudden turnings. Winton’s grunter. They’re talking about what we did during the battle to save the world. “It has taken me years to figure out that there are similarities between the surfer and the writer – or, at least, a writer like me,” he says. His fiction has always been immersed in the landscape of western Australia. How does Winton motivate himself to continue the environmental struggle in the face of official indifference – even sabotage? He survived, and eventually recovered, but “we were no longer the safe, confident people we’d been before”. The man who stood for nothing – and shame on him, and shame on his party.” Official indifference Abbott’s successor, Malcolm Turnbull, has not been markedly more sympathetic to the environment. Now, how many novelists can say they have a new species named after them? Life’s fragile, and we forget that at our peril.” In The Wait and the Flow, Winton draws parallels between writing, which he has done all his adult life, and surfing, which he has done since he was a kid. The waves of energy that come are psychic memories – events, almost all of them in the past, which radiate out. But he was a great wrecker. He never shot anyone – he never even loaded the gun. It’s another species of grunter. You can organise reality; then some …

Fine art graduates fuse forces and flex their mussels

Long before the arrival of the smartphone camera, David Bailey remarked that the impact of technological improvement on photography was that “it makes mediocrity look good”. Essentially graduates showed a succession of wide-ranging photo essays, with many taking chances and pushing expressive possibilities. The next generation of artists: the 2017 graduate shows Vermeer ‘gives you ideas, but not the manual’ Behind the scenes at the National Gallery of Ireland’s stunning renovation Sophie Loughman uses motifs derived from fairy tales in her digital video collage installation, merging domestic and magical woodland settings that propel us forwards with compelling narrative momentum. Work by Ann Ensor. Catarina Leone’s Chrysalis featured an abandoned satin dress in a wild landscape, emblematic of the demands of conformity and the desire to escape them. Photograph: Zak Milofsky Meghan Heeney’s paintings explore embodiment. Conservative estimates suggest that 1.2 trillion digital photographs will be taken this year, the overwhelming majority on mobile phones. Lina Scalzo made a series of fine black-and-white portraits of androgynous young people. We still need photojournalists with expertise and experience, along with photographic specialists in many other areas. Emma Roche’s studies of women in their own spaces aimed to avoid the objectification built into most representations of women in consumer culture. There was also fine work at IADT photography. of Photography Gallery of Photography, Dublin **** In the digital age, more or less everyone is a photographer. Revisiting cubism in the virtual age, Oppermann’s work could be taken as reflecting the fragmentation of the self in a digitised environment, and the potential realignment of the individual’s component parts. Ann Ensor is one of those who made a particularly bold imaginative leap. She sets out to convey the way that patterns of sexism and inequality are invisibly embedded in social norms. Runs June 3rd-18th DIT’s photographic graduate show usually delivers, and this year was no exception. She draws on Irish mythological stories, notably the tale of Midir and Etain, “where the heroine flits between worlds”. NCAD MFA Fine Art and MFA Art in the Digital World The Annexe, 101-103 James’s Street, Dublin June 10-18 ***** This NCAD show has been and gone, but the chances are that we will be seeing a lot more of much of the work that featured in it, and more from the participating artists. Those contexts include, not surprisingly, digital technologies, and also the natural world, gender, cultural identity, and other …