The Ladykillers review: at last, some killer roles for women

Since it was premiered in 2011, Linehan’s daring reconstruction of the quintessentially English Ealing comedy has been frequently dusted down. It’s an apt analogy given the bogus musicians, who plot a robbery from the upstairs room of old Mrs Wilberforce’s King’s Cross terraced house, and the “avant garde” concert, which brings the first act to a hilariously discordant close. ‘Sgt Pepper of a film’ In responding literally to the title – killers who are ladies as opposed to men intent on killing a lady – the production, visually and aurally, lives up to its director’s description of the screen comedy as “a sort of Sgt Pepper of a film”. Stuart Marshall’s loopy, leaning two-storey set, Erin Charteris’s contemporaneously stylish costumes and Conor Mitchell’s plinky/crooning score provide the actors with a playful springboard into some sharply focused characterisations. All of them are rooted in a once-mighty country now floundering and unstable in unfamiliar recovery mode. Lyric Theatre, Belfast **** In a series of madcap, jagged-edged scenarios, Jimmy Fay’s industrious production of Graham Linehan’s stage version of The Ladykillers whooshes through the surreal dreamland of William Rose’s screen original while anchoring the piece firmly in the bittersweet social landscape of post-war Britain. EastEnders regular Cheryl Ferguson brings a rotund, bovine stupidity to One Round, the ultimate personification of the lumpen proletariat; Jo Donnelly delivers a gem of a performance as fumbling ex-army officer Maj Courtney, a closet transvestite, one minute saluting the last days of the Empire, the next salivating over a pink chiffon dress; and Stella McCusker is crystal clear of voice and purpose as the glintingly sweet lady at the still point of the plot, a small but determined symbol of goodness and decency struggling for survival in a dysfunctional new world order. Criminal mastermind In the pivotal role of dodgy lodger Prof Marcus, Abigail McGibbon steadfastly keeps the show on the road as the kind of criminal mastermind so beloved of the 1950s tabloid press. What is an issue is an occasional drop in pace and dramatic tension, not helped by some unconvincing violent encounters between Rose’s colourful gallery of ne’er-do-wells. Runs until July 8 lyrictheatre.co.uk It’s tempting to interpret it as a tokenistic decision, prompted by the recently published Gender Counts report, but such is the quality of the ensemble that it swiftly ceases to be an issue. This, however, is the first time that a revival has …

‘When I have to give up the driving, I hope I die fairly quickly’

“You take it as it comes. If Too Old For the Road? Accompanied by her daughter – whose ribbings are both affectionate and nervous – it prompts reflection on the accidental death of Joan’s son (“He was a bit like his mother,” she says, “never listened”) and later her husband, tying the car to both her independence and sociability. He has age-related macular degeneration, a vision impairment, which means that he will soon be unable to visit his wife, the resident of a nursing home. “Nobody wants you.” (Later, he is in bluff good humour, joking with his passengers about the clarity of his eyesight: “Lucky for you lads.”) Joan, another sprightly 86-year-old, is just as wily, using a paintbrush to conceal fresh car scratches (“Sure, nobody would know the difference,” she laughs mischievously.) But a court summons in Galway for a speeding offence is harder to brush off and it lends her story its arc. Preparedness has always been an important qualification for the licenced motorist, but who sees this coming? It throws all kinds of things at you.” (RTÉ One, Monday, 9.35pm) gets plenty of mileage from its subject – drivers above the age of 70 must routinely reapply for their licences, threatened by declining health or eyesight – it is because driving represents myriad things. As another daughter says of her mother, Anne, “If we had a transport system that was any good she might be able to use that. Even as you admire his lucidity, his exercise routine and his articulate concern for the environment, you can’t help but wonder about the extent of his accumulated carbon footprint: He has been driving for eight decades. Sitting at home in a contemplative mood, but speaking without a trace of self-pity, a man is moved to consider his life, his car and the future. But here, the sentiment is quite extraordinary. “It’s terrible to be getting old, you know?” says Michael, briefly emotional at being burdened and alone. “I don’t want to drive, but I have to,” says Michael, an 83-year-old Kilkenny man, unfussy about his independence and short of illusion. You worry that some of Hogan’s footage, observing the glacial process of reverse manoeuvring or an occasionally unsteady sway from correct lane positioning, might be used as evidence against his subjects. But the programme itself is similarly prone to veering, sometimes between the nostalgic lacquer of its …

New archaeology archive is a treasure trove of heritage data

The Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) Digital Heritage Collections represent 80 per cent of all excavation reports commissioned by the National Roads Authority and the Railway Procurement Agency during Ireland’s extensive programmes of motorway and light rail building between 2001 and 2016. Hundreds of sites In the course of building the national roads network and the light rail system, TII excavated hundreds of archaeological sites. Centenary of Battle of Messines Ridge to be marked by UK-Irish ceremony World’s first bicycle ride took place 200 years ago The Times We Lived In: Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue The project, a collaboration between TII, the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI) and the Discovery Programme, makes it possible for anyone to explore Ireland’s archaeological heritage from every time period and region, with sites ranging from the Bronze Age village of Ballybrowney in Co Cork to a Tudor burial discovered outside Trinity College, Dublin, during excavations for the Luas Cross City. Details of more than 1,500 archaeological excavations across the country are now freely available online as part of a new initiative launched on Monday at the Royal Irish Academy. Variety of platforms While the data is held by the DRI, it can also be accessed through a variety of other national and international platforms, including HeritageMaps.ie (an initiative of the Heritage Council). “Significantly, this means access for local communities across the country to information that relates deeply to their surrounding environment and heritage,” he said. “For TII, making this information accessible and available for the long term through the DRI is entirely consistent with our stated objectives.” The DRI curates, preserves and provides access to a broad range of Ireland’s humanities and social sciences data. “The collections provide an amazing corpus for researchers and general-interest browsing, but also, importantly, TII and the Discovery Programme were committed to ensuring long-term preservation, enhanced discovery and widespread access from the very beginning,” she said. The data can be accessed through dri.ie, heritagemaps.ie and data.gov.ie. Anthony Corns, technology manager at the Discovery Programme, whose mission is to explore Ireland’s past and its cultural heritage, said the new initiative was an important step not just in preserving information for researchers, but also opening up access to wider audiences. “These collections represent the endeavour of numerous archaeologists and site directors, who painstakingly excavated these sites,” said Rónán Swan, head of archaeology and heritage at …

Carrie Fisher had cocaine in her system before her death

Coroner’s officials ruled that Fisher died from sleep apnoea and a combination of other factors. The report, released on Monday, states that Fisher may have taken cocaine three days before the December 23rd flight on which she became ill. PA Carrie Fisher had cocaine in her system when she fell ill on a plane last year, her postmortem examination report shows, but investigators could not determine what impact the cocaine and other drugs found in the actor’s system had on her death. The findings were based on toxicology screenings done on samples taken when the Star Wars actor arrived at a Los Angeles hospital after becoming ill on the flight. She died four days later. Carrie Fisher’s death due to ‘sleep apnoea and other causes’ Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds remembered at ceremony Sharon Horgan: My friend Carrie Fisher, ‘actress, mother, daughter, lunatic, legend’ Investigators also found traces of heroin and MDMA, which is also known as ecstasy, in her system, but they could not determine when Fisher had taken those drugs.

The soldier whose life was saved by his enemy’s donated heart

This power of performance is replayed in every terrorist event in our own media in the same tone of excitement and fear. I’ve interviewed girls who were injured, and the families of those who were killed. After the operation, the surgeon called the act “a ray of light” and said that during the operation he had held both hearts and there was “no difference” between them. Without an audience, the exponential force of terrorism becomes negligible, and its brutal effect doesn’t go beyond those in its immediate vicinity. But my tears help no one, I cried for my own daughters …for me. After the bomb, an innocent Palestinian called Mazan Al-Joulani had been shot in an act of random revenge. That is not why I wrote Beat – The True Story Of A Suicide Bomb And A Heart. In terms of terrorism even after all these years, I don’t know if I have any big answers – but I do know this: the threat to British people, Irish, Americans – it’s negligible. Rowan Somerville is the author of Beat – The True Story of a Suicide Bomb and A Heart, published by Lilliput Press What remains after the London Bridge attacks, a few weeks later, are the symbols of resilience and courage, men and women who drove the crazed knife attackers from the doors of restaurants and bars. For me much of this past decade has passed travelling to Israel and the West Bank, trying to understand what happened 16 years ago. The great American poet Gil Scott Heron declaimed “the revolution will not be televised” in 1970 but today, television is exactly where the revolution is to be found. What held me to this story was not the suffering, no, there was something else amidst the horror in Tel Aviv, something good – the still small voice of hope that remained after Pandora opened her fateful box. Watch yourself getting stepping out the shower my friend – it’s much more dangerous. Terrorism derives from the Latin terreo, or “I frighten”. This is the fact of terrorism: it is a two-handed play of audience and performance, media and public. One young man called Alexei lost both his sisters, a woman called Liya was yards away but felt only a flash of heat as if hot water was thrown on her back – her cousin who had been next to her …

New archaeology archive makes heritage data freely available

“These collections represent the endeavour of numerous archaeologists and site directors, who painstakingly excavated these sites,” said Rónán Swan, Head of Archaeology and Heritage at TII. In the course of building the national roads network and the light rail system, TII excavated hundreds of archaeological sites. The project, a collaboration between TII, the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI) and the Discovery Programme, makes it possible for anyone to explore Ireland’s archaeological heritage from every time period and region, with sites ranging from the Bronze Age village of Ballybrowney in Co Cork to a Tudor burial discovered outside Trinity College, Dublin, during excavations for the Luas Cross City. The Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) Digital Heritage Collections represent 80 per cent of all excavation reports commissioned by the National Roads Authority and the Railway Procurement Agency during Ireland’s extensive programmes of motorway and light rail building between 2001 and 2016. Centenary of Battle of Messines Ridge to be marked by UK-Irish ceremony World’s first bicycle ride took place 200 years ago The Times We Lived In: Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue Details of more than 1,500 archaeological excavations across the country are now freely available online as part of a new initiative launched on Monday at the Royal Irish Academy. “Significantly, this means access for local communities across the country to information that relates deeply to their surrounding environment and heritage,” he said. “The collections provide an amazing corpus for researchers and general interest browsing, but also, importantly, TII and the Discovery Programme were committed to ensuring long-term preservation, enhanced discovery, and widespread access from the very beginning,” she said. Its director, Dr Natalie Harrower, said the project was the result of a collaboration between parties with complementary areas of expertise. While the data is held by the DRI, it can also be accessed through a variety of other national and international platforms, including HeritageMaps.ie (an initiative of the Heritage Council). Online users can browse via semantic search or interactive maps to find what they’re looking for. The data can be accessed through www.dri.ie, www.heritagemaps.ie and https://data.gov.ie “For TII, making this information accessible and available for the long term through the DRI is entirely consistent with our stated objectives.” The DRI curates, preserves, and provides access to a broad range of Ireland’s humanities and social sciences data. Anthony Corns, Technology Manager at the Discovery Programme, whose …

New archaeology archive gives public access to rich resource of heritage date

While the data is held by the DRI, it can also be accessed through a variety of other national and international platforms, including HeritageMaps.ie (an initiative of the Heritage Council). In the course of building the national roads network and the light rail system, TII excavated hundreds of archaeological sites. The data can be accessed through www.dri.ie, www.heritagemaps.ie and https://data.gov.ie “Significantly, this means access for local communities across the country to information that relates deeply to their surrounding environment and heritage,” he said. The project, a collaboration between TII, the Digital Repository of Ireland (DRI) and the Discovery Programme, makes it possible for anyone to explore Ireland’s archaeological heritage from every time period and region, with sites ranging from the Bronze Age village of Ballybrowney in Co Cork to a Tudor burial discovered outside Trinity College, Dublin, during excavations for the Luas Cross City. Online users can browse via semantic search or interactive maps to find what they’re looking for. “These collections represent the endeavour of numerous archaeologists and site directors, who painstakingly excavated these sites,” said Rónán Swan, Head of Archaeology and Heritage at TII. Anthony Corns, Technology Manager at the Discovery Programme, whose mission is to explore Ireland’s past and its cultural heritage, said the new initiative was an important step not just in preserving information for researchers but also opening up access to wider audiences. “The collections provide an amazing corpus for researchers and general interest browsing, but also, importantly, TII and the Discovery Programme were committed to ensuring long-term preservation, enhanced discovery, and widespread access from the very beginning,” she said. The Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) Digital Heritage Collections represent 80 per cent of all excavation reports commissioned by the National Roads Authority and the Railway Procurement Agency during Ireland’s extensive programmes of motorway and light rail building between 2001 and 2016. Its director, Dr Natalie Harrower, said the project was the result of a collaboration between parties with complementary areas of expertise. “For TII, making this information accessible and available for the long term through the DRI is entirely consistent with our stated objectives.” The DRI curates, preserves, and provides access to a broad range of Ireland’s humanities and social sciences data. Details of more than 1,500 archaeological excavations across the country are now freely available online as part of a new initiative launched on Monday at the Royal Irish Academy.

Carlos Maleno Q&A: Finding salvation in stories

How do you interpret this enigmatic passage in Bolaño’s novel? It’s a bit disturbing. Towards the end of The Irish Sea, nostalgia is said to have a transformative effect on reality. But what happens when we perceive this same intelligence in animals that have been treated like mere nutritional products, that will be slaughtered, packed up and consumed? At one point in The Irish Sea, you recall how Robert Walser felt that the critics wanted him to write like Thomas Mann. I think, along with the brilliant Eduardo Lago, that DeLillo is probably one of the most relevant writers in the English language. Apart from all the classics that hold a place in my memory – Conrad, Somerset Maugham, Beckett – I’ve recently been very interested in Don DeLillo, to whom I was a latecomer. He is currently translating Maleno’s second novel, The Endless Rose Is The Irish Sea a novel? In that exchange of glances, Gombrowicz saw the recognition of his being by the cow, the mutual recognition of two living beings that can feel, perceive the world, and suffer. As for newer English-language writers, I’m very interested in Rachel Kushner, perhaps in part because of her kinship with Bolaño. I don’t have to look for the passage, because it’s one of those marked out by the little bits of paper stuck between the pages. Henry James once said that it was imperative for a work of fiction to have a centre from which everything emanates, be it an event, a character, or a character’s consciousness. It brought to mind the distinction in 2666 between major and minor works of literature. If so, did it spur you, or did it develop unexpectedly from the act of writing? Note on the Translator Eric Kurtzke is an American translator of Spanish. The Irish Sea is his first book-length translation. Still don’t. Having read this question, I get up from my chair and find Bolaño’s 2666 on the bookshelf. At the time, I was reading many of the great short story writers. Her cowness shocked my humanness to such a degree – the moment our eyes met was so tense – I stopped dead in my tracks and lost my bearings as a man, that is, as a member of the human species. Yes, the centre of The Irish Sea is the text of the same name, in which there’s enormous weight …

Radiohead at 3Arena: everything you need to know

What about security?   What time does everything kick off?  Are tickets still available? While there is parking available in the Point Village, gig goers are encouraged to leave their cars at home and take the Luas, the 151 bus that operates every 10 minutes during rush hour or to walk. Absolutely not. Doors are at 6.30pm and support comes from Johnny Greenwood’s side project Junun with Israeli composer Shye Ben Tzur and the Indian ensemble the Rajasthan Express. As The Irish Times reported in November when the tickets went on sale, Radiohead took a strong anti-tout stance with the Dublin show, with the name of the purchaser on each ticket, and photo ID will be checked on the door to make sure it matches the name on the ticket. Radiohead are expected onstage at 8.30pm.   How do I get there? Daydreaming Desert Island Disk Ful Stop 15 Step Myxomatosis Climbing Up the Walls All I Need Pyramid Song Everything in Its Right Place Bloom Identikit Idioteque The Gloaming The Numbers Exit Music (for a Film) Bodysnatchers Street Spirit (Fade Out) Encore: Nude Let Down Separator Paranoid Android Reckoner Encore 2: Lotus Flower There There Bags will be checked upon entry and anything that may be deemed as a weapon – like bottles, cans, selfie sticks, large umbrellas, iPads/tablets, video cameras, professional cameras (lens 35mm or more), audio recording devices, Go-Pro, large posters (A3+), large flags on poles, belt chains, laser pointers – are prohibited.  What are they likely to play? They will kick things off at 7.20pm. Here’s a setlist from their recent show at Beekse Bergen in the Netherlands on Sunday night, as a taster.  It’s 20 years since the release of OK Computer so considering the generous set lists from previous tour dates with two encores, maybe they’re tipping on the nostalgic side of things by giving fans plenty to savour. Radiohead confirmed as Glastonbury 2017 headliners Pop Corner: Rihanna returns with some Wild Thoughts Arcade Fire live review: They finally Wake Up when Here Comes the Night Radiohead, in case you didn’t know, are playing a very sold out show in the 3Arena on Tuesday.  They released A Moon Shaped Pool, their ninth studio album, last March and since then they’ve covered most of the festival circuit and are making a strong effort to mix in as much of the new music with the crowd favourites. Tickets …

Index on Censorship: 45 years fighting for writers

Four decades later it carries on with its work to “record and analyse all forms of inroads into freedom of expression” and to publish censored material. Miller goes on to relate his own experiences and they would resonate with many writers living in exile today: “I have myself sat down at dinner with a Czech writer and his family in his own home and looked out and seen police sitting in their cars down below, in effect warning my friend our “meeting” was being observed. Index founder, poet Stephen Spender, wearing the Samuel Beckett campaign T-shirt Samuel Beckett wasn’t the only Irish writer to be involved in Index’s early days, poet and mystery writer Cecil Day-Lewis was among of a group of prestigious writers and artists who pledged to help poet Stephen Spender highlight the plight of censored writers and helped to set up Index. The Index magazine archive is a wall full of copies of all shapes and sizes, as the magazine has been redesigned over the decades, but is a voyage through all the continents of the world. Copies of Index on Censorship Rachael Jolley, editor of Index on Censorship magazine The same threats that those writers behind the Iron Curtain faced in 1972 are still faced today. Rachael Jolley is editor of the quarterly Index on Censorship magazine, which was first published in 1972, and is available around the world, www.exacteditions.com/indexoncensorship Follow us @index_magazine Writers are still being shot. Index also publishes some of the world’s greatest journalists, as well as up and coming names, exposing attacks on freedom of expression. Journalism and fiction is still suppressed when it upsets governments. We continue to track many cases. Recently University of Ulster academic Goretti Horgan wrote for us on what she considered had been “the greatest taboo in the Republic and Northern Ireland”, abortion and how politicians were being forced to address women’s concerns, and the innovative protests of the Speaking of Imelda group in sending knickers to Irish politicians to bring attention to the case for legal abortion. And Index magazine continues to publish those who are banned or persecuted. Canan Coskun is a journalist at the daily Turkish paper Cumhuriyet, who has faced multiple court cases because her reporting has uncovered stories that make the Turkish government uncomfortable. Other taboos covered, or uncovered, in the same issue of the magazine included China’s restrictions on reading about …

Pop Corner: Rihanna returns with some Wild Thoughts

It’s a sultry, sweaty, Spanish heatwave of a track – the perfect soundtrack to late-night texting an ex, or scoping out the local talent on a summer holiday. “It’s a departure, and it’s a necessary evolution that I have to take. they were like, ‘F**k her, she’s got really far-apart eyes.’ I remember being like, ‘Whoa! It’s not just teenagers that feel overwhelmed or exhausted mentally. But what we did know is that Rihanna didn’t come here to mess around. TRACK OF THE WEEK Rihanna, DJ Khaled and Bryson Tiller – Wild Thoughts Who knew that the song of the summer would sample Santana’s Maria Maria? We need to build images of strength to represent the act of asking for help. I think it’s starting younger so we need to start building mental health and self care into young kids lives.” Meanwhile, Katy Perry told the New York Times that she’s in a metamorphosis. Hero of the week is Tegan from Tegan and Sara, who told NME: “I think we need to continue to invest in resources for young people to support them through their toughest years. We need to continue as public people to talk about how we struggle too to help remove some of the stigma. Her first line? It takes someone quite brave and strong to say ‘I need help’. “I don’t know if you could take it/ Know you wanna see me naked”. How did I get all this way without knowing I had far-apart eyes?’ Just weird sh*t like that. She explained: “I remember being made aware of my looks and my body in a way that I had never been. I feel so comfortable in myself.” But I was able to return to my family and shelter against that and get to where I am now. And I know that sometimes it feels publicly like I’m dragging cement blocks, but like, the pyramids were made out of cement blocks – or not cement. I’m gonna get there.” Zero of the week is online haters, Lorde told NME. But do you know what I’m trying to say? I remember all these kids online…

The terror victim’s heart donated to save life of ‘enemy’

It is a narrative of drama and fear, and to exist, that narrative must not only be narrated but heard. As the son of two cardiologists perhaps it was inevitable that it should impact so deeply on me. They were waiting to dance and celebrate because it was “teen night” at the disco. This power of performance is replayed in every terrorist event in our own media in the same tone of excitement and fear. Without an audience, terrorism is just another crime. In terms of terrorism even after all these years, I don’t know if I have any big answers – but I do know this: the threat to British people, Irish, Americans – it’s negligible. What remains beyond the grief and anger in Manchester are the memories of the city’s hotels giving free rooms, the taxi companies driving people home without charge, the strangers looking after other people’s children, the police and military besieged with cups of tea and food. Most of those around Hotari were teenaged girls – children really. Of course this resonates horribly, because only a few weeks ago in Manchester Salman Abedi, who like the Tel Aviv bomber was in his 23rd year of life, positioned himself amidst a group of predominantly young people outside and blew himself up. One young man called Alexei lost both his sisters, a woman called Liya was yards away but felt only a flash of heat as if hot water was thrown on her back – her cousin who had been next to her was blown back 30 feet. After the bomb, an innocent Palestinian called Mazan Al-Joulani had been shot in an act of random revenge. And here it is for me: The idea Manchester holds on to is not one of fear and not one of revenge. That is not why I wrote Beat – The True Story Of A Suicide Bomb And A Heart. This is the fact of terrorism: it is a two-handed play of audience and performance, media and public. I have spoken to many who were there that fateful night. Without an audience, the exponential force of terrorism becomes negligible, and its brutal effect doesn’t go beyond those in its immediate vicinity. I have spoken to blast specialists, security experts and I have spent many hours with the family of the bomber, trying to understand, beyond news and politics, who he was …

Exclusive: Body and Soul stage times revealed

12.00-13.00 House of Yoga featuring Karla Kelly. Comedian Danny O’Brien brings the laughs & talks all things festival 18.00-18.45 My Kitchen Rules with chefs Gary O’Hanlon & Frankie Mallon 17.00-17.45 Hey good looking, what you got shucking? Laurence Mackin in discussion with John Concannon (CI), Mary Nally (Drop Everything ) Mary Hickson (Clonmel Junction Festival and Sounds from A Safe Harbour) with Dave Tynan (Heartbreak, We Face This Land, Just Saying) 13:45-14:30 Irish Times Presents: Brexit, Trump and the Right: Time to Resist? Music & comedy from Ireland’s oldest & least successful boyband! 11.00-12.00 Today FMs Nadine O’Regan will be recording a very special episode of Songs in the Key of Life with special guest. 17.30-18.30 Women on Walls: “You cannot be what you cannot see. Woodlands Friday 01:00-Close Ancillary Entertainment with Le Boom followed by Lyra 00:00-01:00 Jafaris 22:40-23:30 Mario Batkovic 21:30-22:10 Katie Laffan Saturday 02:00-Close Ancillary Entertainment with Shookrah followed by My House 01:15-02:00 Elaine Mai 00:00-00:45 Joni 22:30-23:30 Cian Finn 21:15-22:00 I Have a Tribe 20:00- 20:45 Jinx Lennon Sunday 23:15-Close Ancillary Entertainment with Ships followed by BARQ 22:30- 23:15 Kelsey Lu 21:15 -22:00 Skott 19:45-20:45 Brooke Bentham 18:30-19.30 Sing Along Social : Pop Battle Pagoda Stage Friday 00.45-Close Ancillary Entertainment with Wastefellow followed by PrYmary Colours 00.00-00.45 Sylk 23.00-23.45 Spooky Tuesday 21.30-22.15 NC Grey 20.00-20.45 Jafaris 18.30-19.15 Beatrix Nova 17.00-17.45 Melina Malone Saturday 01.45-Close Ancillary Entertainment with Klark Cant followed by Sam Kinsella 01.00-01.45 Colorama 00.15-00.45 Apollonia Tribal Bellydance 23.00-23.45 Ryan Vail 21.45-22.30 DJ Lex Woo & Burlesqdisco 20.30-21.15 Zaska 19.00-19.45 Sonnets & Sisters 17.45-18.30 Tee Cardaci 16.30-17.15 Cantina Bop Electroswing 15.00-15.45 45 Live: Baz Hickey 13.30-14.15 Al-Jive Mestizo Sunday 23:00-Close Ancillary Entertainment with Alex Smyth followed by Dowth 22.15-23.00 Auxiliary Phoenix Trio 20.45-21.45 DJ Nigel Woods & Live Art by Paola Catizone 19.15-20.15 Megacone 17.45-18.45 Al-Jive Mestizo 16.30-17.30 Pine the Pilcrow 15.15-16.15 The Tiny Quartet 13.30-14.45 GRAND Food on Board Stage Friday 23rd June 23.00-01.00 County Vinyl 22:00-22:40 My Fellow Sponges 20:00- 20:40 Ye Vagabonds Body & Soul: Six acts not to miss Ho99o9: ‘The first time we came to Ireland, we met the nicest border guard’ Robbie Williams at the Aviva: “Ireland! Miss Red 20:00- 21:00 Mr TC 17:00-19:30 Kelly-Anne Byrne Saturday 01:00-01:45 King Kong Company 23:30-00:30 Idiotape 22:00-23:00 DBFC 20:30– 21:30 Weval 18:45-20:00 New Jackson 16:00-18:30 GASH Collective Sunday 22:50-23:45 Mykki Blanco 21:30- 22:30 RÜFÜS 20:00- 21:00 A Tribe Called Red 18:30-19:30 Formation …

Exclusive: Body and Soul stage times

17.30-18.30 Women on Walls: “You cannot be what you cannot see. 11.00-12.00 Today FMs Nadine O’Regan will be recording a very special episode of Songs in the Key of Life with special guest. 15.20-16.20 FACTION with Blindboy Boatclub-a fast-moving, irrerverent debate that seeks to separate fact from fiction on a major political issue 14.00-15.15 The Rick O’Shea Book Club: It Could Be Worse-Writing About the Near Future 12.00-13.45 Salon du Chat-Speed debating, chit without the chat. Body&Soul Stage Friday 01:00-01:45 Parcels 23:30-00:30 Metronomy 22:00-22:50 Anna Meredith 20:30-21:30 Talos 19:15-20:00 TooFools 18:00-18:45 Ollie Bell Saturday Vitalic headlines the main stage on Saturday 00:45-01.45 Vitalic 23:15-00:15 Bonobo 21:30-22:30 Sleaford Mods 20:00-21:00 La Femme 18:30-19:30 Lambchop 17:15-18:00 Tiggs Da Author 16:00-16:45 Mammút 15:00-15:30 Loah 14:00-14:30 John Conneely Inc. Presented by Kathy Sheridan with guests Brid Smith TD, comedian Erin McGathy, campaigner Lucy Watmough and musical guest Mongoose. with Virginia O’Gara from My Goodness Sunday 19.00-20.00 Talking Funny! Joan Mulvihill discusses the recent Women on Walls project with Eithne Harley of Accenture, Pauric Dempsey of RIA and Prof Lydia Lynch of TCD and Harvard Medical School. Making sense in the aftermath of shock elections either side of the Atlantic with former with former Washington Correspondent Simon Carswell, Sarah Carey + guests 12.00-13.30 Irish Times Presents: The Walk of Shame with The Irish Times Women’s Podcast. “ 18.30-19.30 Exploring the Cosmos: Join astrologers, Andrew Smith and Karen Morgan in conversation with Ruth Meehan, as they talk about the relevancy of our connection to this cosmic weave on a personal and collective basis, as well as on a historical and contemporary level. 16.30-17.30 WASTED!- A grown-up debate about the positive side of drugs and psychedelics 15.20-16.20 My Secret Planet with Dr. Champagne & chocolate with Susan & Judith Boyle 15.00-15.45 Chef & producer Kwanghi Chan reveals the secrets to The Best Spice Bag You’ll Ever Eat! 14:45-15:30 Irish Times Presents: Creative Ireland. With Niall Sabongi from Klaw Dublin 16.00-16.45 This could be heaven! This conversation witl be hosted by Aoife McElwain with Ross Dungan (Writer) Nathalie Marquez Courtney (Photographer) and Dr Stephen Kinsella (Economist). Siobhan Kane in discussion with Emmet Kirwan and Adrian Crowley with performances from both Emmet and Adrian. Patrick Freyne, Sally Cinnamon and guests discuss the cultural touchstones that reflect our national soul. 14.00-14.45 Booze, Bitters & Botanicals! 18.00-18.45 Bubbles & Banter-Irish Times’ journalist Gemma Tipton & the world’s number one female sommelier Julie Dupouy Saturday 19.00-20.00 30 …

Léarscáil an tSiosúir

Na Caomhaigh chun cinn de bheagán, na mionpháirtithe le tacaíocht mhór lasmuigh sa doircheántacht mar is dual dá gcóras lofa. Ó thaobh na léarscáile de, b’iad a bhain agus a bhuaigh is ag a raibh an lá. Béal Feirste ina chathair idirnáisiúnta ar nós Iarúsailéim, cé nach slán an tsamhail í sin, tá súil agat. Is é a léimfeadh amach sa phus ort, gan amhras, ná na himill. Is amhlaidh, áfach, go ndéantar leathcheal i leathchúpla na staire, an gheograif féin. Is fan na teorann le Sasana a bhuaigh na Caomhaigh go leor dá gcuid suíochán; agus ina dhiaidh sin ag snámh leo go sleamhain ar an gcósta thoir thuaidh. Sa stáitín sin ar gean linn é ní mór ná go bhféadfá críchdheighilt eile a dhéanamh. Ina choinne sin, b’iad fós ba mhó agus b’fhorleithne ar fud na críche. Is é is follasaí díobh ná na contaetha soir ó thuaidh sa tír seo. An Bhreatimeacht romhainn, buíochas le Dia, agus na cártaí go léir ag titim níos gaire don bhaile. Plaid Cymru sna háiteanna inar láidre an Bhreatnais ar an gcósta thiar, gan amhras. B’iad na vótaí ba mhó ba chás le daoine mar is iad siúd is mó a mheánn. An concas a dhein na Sasanaigh ón 13ú haois i leith tá á chreimeadh uidh ar n-uidh. Téann i bhfolach sna choinicéir agus éiríonn aníos nuair is lú a mbíonn coinne léi. Ba mheasa fós an scéal do dhaoine nach mian leo na Tóraithe a bheith i gceannas na Banríochta. Tá An Bhreatain Bheag soiléir go maith, leis. Níos minicí ná a chéile is ceart agus is cóir sin. Is fiú féachaint ar an ár, nó ar an gcúlú féin, áfach. Níorbh fhéidir nach gcaillfeadh an Páirtí Náisúnta Albanach go leor, óir ba chuma nó míorúilt í gaisce 2015. Más í an stair a thugann an gheograif ar an bhfód, níl an gheograif sásta a greim a scaoileadh chomh furasta sin. An Lucht Allais go láidir sna baill sin ina mbíodh mianaigh ghuail agus sloic dhubha agus sclábhaíocht dhorcha na n-oibrithe ag vótáil dóibh le dílseacht seanaigne go brách. B’í an ghoirme Chaomhach a bhí spréite ar fud Shasana, na bailte is na sráidbhailte is na contaetha is lucht fiaigh agus seilge agus Midsomer Murders go láidir ar son Mayhem agus Maybot. Ní ghabhann an stair as riamh. Tá an chuma air go bhfuil an stair agus an gheograif …

Oíche mhór filíochta le bheith i nGaillimh

Beidh ócáid ar leith filíochta sa Taibhdhearc, Gaillimh, Déadaoin ag 7p.m. Triúr filí comhaimseartha Gaeilge – Dairena Ní Chinnéide, Simon Ó Faoláin agus Louis de Paor – a bheas ag léamh agus tá saorchead isteach ann. Tháinig Louis de Paor ar an tsaol i gCorcaigh agus d’fhoilsigh Bloodaxe mórdhíolaim dhátheangach filíochta Ghaeilge dá chuid, Leabhar na hAthghabhála/Poems of the Repossession anuraidh. De bhunadh Chorca Dhuibhne í Dairena Ní Chinnéide agus is é Fá Gheasa/Spellbound (Arlen House) an cnuasach is nuaí dá cuid. Is as Baile Átha Cliath do Simon Ó Faoláin agus is é Fé Sholas Luaineach (Coiscéim) an cnuasach is déanaí dá chuid.

Taoiseach and Irish groups locked in that old céilí dance

By Thursday, they had to modify their praise. Perhaps, in that light, it is no surprise then that so many Irish speakers are so desperate for a bit of love from the new Taoiseach. They welcomed the appointment, saying it was a step forward. The Irish for ‘honeymoon’ is mí na meala, the month of honey. In the meantime, Irish speakers were beginning to wonder how Joe McHugh would find the time to be both Chief Whip and to advance the cause of the (non-existent) Gaeltacht and the Irish language in general. All this was, of course taking, place against a widespread distrust of the Government’s commitment (or lack thereof) towards the language during the Kenny years. By my reckoning, new Taoiseach Leo Varadkar’s honeymoon with Irish speakers lasted about 24 hours. The journalist Breandán Delap recently wrote an article in the magazine Comhar that Kenny’s term had created an “inhospitable atmosphere” towards Irish. Sinn Féin’s Peadar Tóibín, TD, said that the Taoiseach was “diminishing” the importance of the Gaeltacht and the Irish language. Kenny had, paradoxically, been the Taoiseach who had spoken most Irish while in office but had also managed to do the most damage to the language since the foundation of the State. Delap concluded that Kenny failed in “his moral duty” to make sure that the language was better off when he left office than it had been before he took power. (It was the first time since 1956 that the word ‘Gaeltacht’ had not been given some departmental recognition.) Former Minsiter of State for the Gaeltacht, Seán Kyne, let it be known on social media that he had raised the matter with the Taoiseach and former Gaeltacht minister, Fianna Fáil TD Éamon Ó Cuív, also decried the decision. Nonetheless, the misteps might suggest to many Irish speakers that they will be locked once again in that old céilí dance with the new Taoiseach and his Government: one step forward, two steps back, one step forward, two steps back and around and around and around we go. His willingness to use Irish while in office will be welcomed. (No Gaeltacht? Afterall, the linguistic landscape which Varadkar inherits is one which he helped shape. The Taoiseach’s plan to drop the word ‘Gaeltacht’ from his new Department of Culture was not so welcome and was a “source of concern”. There are few Irish speakers who would disagree with …

Samhradh na gclamhán sa spéir mhór iontach

Cad é mar a aimsíonn siad an teas san aer? Is draíochtúil an radharc é an clamhán. Cad é mar a thagann siad ar an tsruthán te aeir a thógfas go barr na spéire iad? Bhí an bheirt sin i mbun bailé; iad ag damhsa leo; éan amháin ag eitilt deiseal agus agus an t-éan eile tuathal; iad ag bogadh, diaidh ar ndiaidh, in airde; iad beirt ar lorg teasa san aer a d’iompródh chun na gréine iad. Chonaic mé péire ar an teorainn idir Aontroim agus Ard Mhacha; ceann eile faoi Mhaigh Rath i gceantar an Dúin; péire eile faoi chúpla míle de Lios na gCearrbhach in Aontroim. Tig leis an tsaol ar talamh bheith cadránta acu. Chonaic mé éin bheaga agus fiacha ag tabhairt faoin chlamhán go minic. Ach is éan mór é agus tugann tú suntas dó. Tá clamháin le feiceáil gach aon áit de bharr na dea-aimsire. Níl cuideachta na gclamhán uathu; bagairt atá sa chlamhán dóibh. Mar sin féin, tá rud inteacht sa chroí acu a shantaíonn aer te, a shantaíonn an chuid is uachtaraí den spéir a bhaint amach. Sea, ní iolar é. Ní chuireann siad brú mór orthu féin i mbun eitilte; eitlíonn siad go malltriallach, ar nós cuma liom, fiú. B’fhéidir gurb í sin an chúis go n-imíonn na clamháin chun na bhflaitheas. Sin an cheist a chuirim orm féin. Aithníonn clamhán clamhán eile. póm Ní bheidh éan ar bith eile thuas ansin ach a gcineál féin agus iad ag damhsa leo, deiseal agus tuathal. Cad é an seans go bhfeicfinn iolar?

Grianstad an tsamhraidh agus treo nua

Ach má tá dul chun cinn tábhachtach, tá mórán gnéithe eile ag baint le cúrsaí ama nár cheart ligean i ndearmad. Is féidir taifeadadh a dhéanamh leis an gceamara nó leis na scéalta ar ndóigh agus cuireann sé sin leis na cuimhní cinn. Is iad na gluaiseachtaí seo a thugann dúinn na séasúir, grianstad an tsamhraidh agus an gheimhridh, maraon le cónocht an fhómhair agus an earraigh, nuair a bhíonn an lá agus an oíche ar chomhfhad. An bhrí chéanna atá le ‘solstice’ an Bhéarla, focal ata ar aon dul le ‘armstice’ mar shampla – agus stad curtha leis na hairm a chás sin. Dul i dtreo nua seachas teacht go dtí lánstad. Dé Céadaoin a bheidh grianstad an tsamhraidh chugainn, an lá is faide sa bhliain. Ina measc tá tagairt don am mar shéasúr. Tá léiriú airsean le fáil i bhfoclóir Uí Dhónaill féin, sa mhéid ceannfhocal a thugtar don focal ‘am’ – 15 cinn ar fad! Timthriall, seachas triall. Bogann an t-am ar aghaidh dá réir sin. Bíonn mórán den lucht rachmais ar bheagán ama chomh maith le cách. Agus ar ár ndícheall gan aon am a chur amú. Glactar leis gur tagairt é grianstad do shuíomh na gréine a bheith ina stad. Is meabhrú é go bhféadfaí aithris a dhéanamh anois is arís ar na gluaiseachtaí thuas inár saol féin. Is uaigneach an duine a bhíonn ina ‘Oisín i ndiaidh na Féinne’. Leanann an ghluaiseacht gan stad gan staonadh mar sin, fiú más í a mhalairt a chuirimid in iúl le ‘grianstad’. Agus ní féidir stad a chur leis an dul in aois a ghabhann leis. Féile mhór i bhféilire na gCeilteach a bhíodh ann agus mórán tinte ar lasadh do bhandia na soilse, Étain. Alfred Prufrock go raibh a shaol róthomhaiste ag na spúnóga caifé 100 bliain ó shin, is mó la a bhímid faoi chuing ag mionghléasanna eile na laethanta seo chomh maith, an i-fón san áireamh. Dóibhsean atá sa leathsféar theas, san Astráil mar shampla, a mhalairt de lá a bheidh acu Dé Céadaoin, grianstad an gheimhridh agus an lá is giorra. Ní stad atá ag tarlú Dé Céadaoin ach an domhan a bheith tosaithe ar dhul i malairt de threo. Is ábhar machnaimh dúinne na gluaiseachtaí seo sa spéir. Fad ama Má bhíonn fonn orainn fad a chur leis an am saoil, bímid ar ár ndícheall chomh maith fad a chur leis an …