Rare second World War colour photographs revealed

There are also pictures from German and American sources, including US aircrew. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA Land Army members sawing larch poles for use as pit props at the Women’s Timber Corps training camp at Culford, Suffolk, 1943 Photograph: IWM/PA The British Ministry of Information, which controlled output of material to the press during the war, wanted to obtain colour photographs as a record and for inclusion in publications which could print in colour. Dutch civilians dancing in the streets after the liberation of Eindhoven by Allied forces, September 1944. But the photographs in the book, The Second World War in Colour, bring it vividly to life with images that look as if they were taken yesterday – or come from a film set. A new book from the Imperial War Museums (IWM) includes rarely seen colour images taken by official photographers, as well as news agencies, freelancers and even air crews, many of which are being published for the first time. The scarcity of colour film and the high cost of reproducing it in printed publications during the second World War means that for most people today the war is a black and white conflict. Images portray the fighting fronts, with rare photography of Mustangs and Spitfires in flight and the RAF’s top-scoring fighter pilot, Wing Commander ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, with his pet dog Sally. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA Air raid warden in Holborn, London. Photogaaph: Photograph: IWM/PA – (PA) But there are colour pictures of the last months of the war in Europe, including Dutch celebrations after the liberation of Eindhoven, and an image of the spontaneous celebrations of VE Day in Whitehall, central London. Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery explaining Allied strategy to King George VI in his command caravan in Holland, October 1944. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA Wire No colour film was supplied to British official photographers to document the D-Day landings. A crew from the 16th/5th Lancers, 6th Armoured Division, cleaning the gun barrel of their Crusader tank at El Aroussa in Tunisia, May 1943. All of the photographs in the book come from the IWM photograph archive, and most were taken by a band of British official photographers, while the ministry also sourced colour images from agencies and freelancers. Lt Vernon R Richards of the 361st Fighter Group flying his P-51D Mustang nicknamed Tika IV during a bomber escort mission in 1944. Some 3,000 colour pictures were taken …

Rare second World War colour photographs revaled

But the photographs in the book, The Second World War in Colour, bring it vividly to life with images that look as if they were taken yesterday – or come from a film set. But there are colour pictures of the last months of the war in Europe, including Dutch celebrations after the liberation of Eindhoven, and an image of the spontaneous celebrations of VE Day in Whitehall, central London. There are also pictures from German and American sources, including US aircrew. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA General Dwight D Eisenhower and his senior commanders at supreme allied headquarters in London, February 1944. Some 3,000 colour pictures were taken between 1942 and 1945, and those that survived were passed to the IWM in 1949. Images portray the fighting fronts, with rare photography of Mustangs and Spitfires in flight and the RAF’s top-scoring fighter pilot, Wing Commander ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, with his pet dog Sally. The scarcity of colour film and the high cost of reproducing it in printed publications during the second World War means that for most people today the war is a black and white conflict. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA Land Army members sawing larch poles for use as pit props at the Women’s Timber Corps training camp at Culford, Suffolk, 1943 Photograph: IWM/PA The British Ministry of Information, which controlled output of material to the press during the war, wanted to obtain colour photographs as a record and for inclusion in publications which could print in colour. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA Air raid warden in Holborn, London. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA Wire No colour film was supplied to British official photographers to document the D-Day landings. They range from the women preparing bullets and cannon shells underground to shots of troops in training, stationed in Italy and Tunisia, and sightseeing in Greece. Photogaaph: Photograph: IWM/PA – (PA) Field Marshal Sir Bernard Montgomery explaining Allied strategy to King George VI in his command caravan in Holland, October 1944. A crew from the 16th/5th Lancers, 6th Armoured Division, cleaning the gun barrel of their Crusader tank at El Aroussa in Tunisia, May 1943. Photograph: IWM/PA B-24 Liberator bombers of the 491st Bomb Group, US Eighth Air Force, en route to a target in Germany, 1944. An extraordinary collection of rare colour photographs reveal the second World War as the people living through the conflict would have seen it. Photograph: Ted Dearberg/IWM/PA There are images of …

“Dignity, always dignity” – Five great movies about moviemaking

Berberian Sound Studio (20120 Peter Strickland casts Toby Jones (above) as a timid soundman working on an Italian horror film. Endlessly odd. Stuffed with love for the form. 8½ (1963) Marcello Mastroianni (above) plays a director trying to work his way out of artistic blockage. The great man’s famous comedy concerns a director, played by Joel McCrea (with Veronica Lake, above) who wants to make films with a message. Famous shots of Mediterranean and Brigitte Bardot (above). The title number and Good Morning are like the work of sorcerers. Sullivan’s Travels (1941) How clever was Preston Sturges? Le Mepris (1963) Jean-Luc Godard boldly shot provocation stars Jack Palance as a producer trying to get a film version of Homer’s Odyssey off the ground. Despite its wilful strangeness, Fellini’s monochrome dream has proved hugely influential. Singin’ in the Rain (1952) The convulsions that came to cinema with the arrival of sound inspire a great Stanley Donen musical, for which star Gene Kelly (above) gets a co-directing credit. This film’s message is: no message is necessary.

How long before we realise our music and movie subscriptions aren’t worth it?

Subscriptions are now the easy way for all of us to get and pay for music, movies and many other parts of our lives. The subscription model will be eventually eclipsed. Many people were still getting their heads around digital downloads at the time – humans, surprisingly, take a while to get used to new things – so the notion of a move to subscriptions and streaming was viewed as a bit premature. Getting all the love and all the cash in 2017 doesn’t mean you’ll still be getting them in 2022 or 2027.  This is especially true of subscriptions: there will come a time when consumers say, “Hang on a minute, lads.” They’ll tot up their entertainment outgoings each month and realise they’re paying a pretty penny for stuff that just ends up on their to-watch and to-listen-to lists. They’ll also cop, as they did when the CD was the format of choice, that they’re paying an awful lot just to get a little. This is good news for the businesses, as subscriptions let them more accurately forecast how much cash will come in each quarter. Getting all the love and all the cash in 2017 doesn’t mean you’ll still be getting them in 2022 or 2027 But how long will subscriptions be all the rage for? Look at your bank statements: you may have 10 or more subs going out of your account each month. From Spotify and Netflix to publications such as the New Yorker, the New York Times, Dublin Inquirer and The Irish Times, subscriptions have become an essential part of our monthly spend. But change came rather more quickly than anyone anticipated. A decade or so ago, with music and entertainment in one of their periodic shifts, many of us speculated that the future would be all about subscriptions. If you want only one or two songs, do you need to shell out for a monthly subscription? They used to be just for big services, such as Sky or Virgin Media, but they’re now common currency. And subscribers hang around, as they don’t view each monthly payment as a huge outgoing. People swapped downloading from iTunes for streaming a lot more quickly than they had moved from physical to digital, in the early 2000s. You can credit technology for this, as well as convenience, simplicity and consumer confidence. And what if we just decide that …

Run the Jewels on why rap is modern mythology

Hundreds of years later, you have all these poor white people in south Georgia, taken by factories and brought to Atlanta. “Artists are now afraid to show who they really are. The prices would be set up 300 per cent, they were basically enslaved; so the underclass in Atlanta was white-Cabbagetown. Three acclaimed albums later, and a myriad of collaborative projects harnessing their distinctive, exciting, organic approach have reinvigorated hip-hop, at a time when the world is in need of superheroes. I think I could go to an island in the middle of the Indian ocean and still write about Brooklyn: it’s everywhere I have known.” The writer John McGahern always maintained that the local is the universal. We have a process where Mike is free to go and zone out and go in the booth, when he is high and walking around, thinking of shit, and I am free to just sit there and go: ‘Shut up, don’t fuckin’ talk to me.’ ” Not black and white Humour also plays a major part. I will be silent for eight hours, and then I will come into the booth and have it. His flow is still evident, it’s the predecessor to Jay-Z’s, and even Drake’s talk-flow, being conversed with, rather than being rapped at. I could figure out funny ways to make people feel like assholes when I rapped.” I might say some shit that pisses a woman off; she goes to the booth tomorrow and makes a blazing diss record and wipes my ass out On Don’t Get Captured, from RTJ3, Mike references an evocative sounding place, Cabbagetown, providing a less-obvious narrative about his muse, Atlanta. I grew up in the south in the middle of the crack era, and it was fucked up, so being smart was secondary to being hard or rich “Robert Crumb used to come to parties at my house when I was growing up,” says El-P. The two laugh together easily, sometimes finishing each other’s sentences. Powerful moments are only discovered when you dredge through the shit that you think makes you this unique little self “Rakim did. This sense of empowerment, and a kind of swagger, is key to their worldview, and hip-hop is particularly good at communicating that. The idea was, thematically, that you are the chain, you are the prize, the jewels are within you.” Swagger This message was something they recently …

Record Store Day: keeping the vinyl spinning through boom and bust

It’s very difficult when you’re young to know what to look for “A guy goes to the pressing plant three or four times a year and then gets very indignant that the pressing plants are busy. Musically, the shop caters to an audience interested in electronic music, DJ-friendly 12-inches, hip-hop, scene compilations and the “more collector weirdo end of things”, is how O’Brien puts it. So you try and push them into the ones that are built to last, the more classic type that’ll have a better shelf life.” Long game O’Brien is playing the long game with new customers as he wants them to become old customers. Those are the headlines. Vinyl sales are currently at a 25-year high. You can’t be giving out to people because they’re busy – that’s a bit much.” Cashing in Much of the criticism around Record Store Day is aimed at major labels cashing in on vinyl trends with unsubstantial new releases, and O’Brien concedes that there is an issue there but is pragmatic about its outcome. A sales pitch driven by nostalgia. And to any young person, walking into a record shop with little knowledge, armed with scant information gleaned off the internet can be intimidating. It’s difficult to compete with that. The reality is records have become more popular and if you’re selling records, that’s a good thing.” Olan O’Brien, the proprietor of All City Records, a shop and label based in Dublin’s Temple Bar: “The first 50 to 100 records you buy will probably be your worst ones.” As for the records O’Brien sells in All City, he says it’s a bit of a golden age for releases in terms of quality and admits that vinyl has become more expensive across the board – “a little bit pricey”. “I speak to Dennis from R.A.G.E. Over the years, he has seen the regular customers’ tastes change as they get older. Even though the internet has opened things up so the kid might know who the artists are, it’s not the easiest thing to know what’s available. “People are trying to put a normal profit margin on them and it’s making them feel very expensive for something you can get for free digitally if they didn’t want to pay for it. I try and be a bit Jesuit about it. “When you can go on to the internet any time, day or …

Concert series hits bum note on lack of women composers

Last week’s announcement of the NCH’s 2017-18 International Concert Series revealed that the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra will open the series, on August 31st, with a programme of Peteris Vasks, Elgar (the Cello Concerto with Gautier Capuçon) and Rachmaninov under the orchestra’s Lithuanian music director, Mirga Gražinyte-Tyla. Photograph: OPW Put the performers back where they belong It’s just over a year since the renovated Kevin Barry Recital Room at the National Concert Hall was opened by Taoiseach Enda Kenny and Minister for Arts Heather Humphreys. Those sounds are no longer a problem. At the end of last month the National Concert Hall unveiled its Female Conductor Programme, a 10-month project, supported by Grant Thornton, that is “designed to coach, mentor, encourage and promote talented female conductors at the outset of their careers”. Before renovation the intrusive noises came from outside the building, from passing traffic, wind and rain and, occasionally, the chatter of concertgoers taking the air during the interval at an event in the main auditorium. The issue is that conversations from the other side – the corridor that leads to the room – still manage to intrude on the music. Their movement is not soundproofed, so if anyone tries to enter during a performance – it happens more often than you would expect – the doors clack off each other when they close. Full details and booking at nch.ie. Just one woman composer features in the programmes so far announced for the International Concert Series. Before all of those there is a return visit from the Tallis Scholars (October 5th), a pairing of the Borodin Quartet with the pianist Barry Douglas (November 8th), the City of London Sinfonia under Michael Collins with the pianist Michael McHale (November 11th, with a family concert the next day), and the Irish debut of one of the planet’s hottest pianists, Daniil Trifonov (December 5th). But it’s a not uncommon experience for everything to sound too loud. And, still on the subject of noise, the air conditioning sometimes makes its presence pronounced for people seated in the back row. On June 12th, 2018, Stamatia Karampiniwill conduct the Würth Philharmoniker, an orchestra so new it has yet to give its first concert. Nox Vitae, by the Ukrainian-born, Estonia-resident Galina Grigorjeva, features in the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir’s programme under Kaspars Putnins on January 31st. After all, there’s probably a very good reason why …

A year after the Composing the Island outcry, women composers barely register

The biggest problem, however, is the sound. At the end of last month the National Concert Hall unveiled its Female Conductor Programme, a 10-month project, supported by Grant Thornton, that is “designed to coach, mentor, encourage and promote talented female conductors at the outset of their careers”. The few concerts I’ve heard that used that layout seemed to benefit hugely from the change. It’s a pretty deadly effect, and the unfortunate outcome is that it makes performers seem insensitive to their listeners. Those doors create other problems, too. Full details and booking at nch.ie. On June 12th, 2018, Stamatia Karampiniwill conduct the Würth Philharmoniker, an orchestra so new it has yet to give its first concert. Last May the announcement of the Composing the Island festival was followed by an outcry about the representation of women in that survey of 100 years of music in Ireland. And, still on the subject of noise, the air conditioning sometimes makes its presence pronounced for people seated in the back row. The season also includes a return by the Academy of St Martin in the Fields under Joshua Bell (January 20th, 2018), three concerts by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra (Jirí Belohlávek conducting Dvorák on February 17th, 2018, and Smetana on February 18th, with a family concert on the Sunday afternoon), Simon Rattle conducting the London Symphony Orchestra in Mahler’s Ninth Symphony (April 18th, 2018), return visits by the pianist Philippe Cassard(March 15th, 2018) and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra (May 10th, 2018) and a first visit by the Belgian choir Vox Luminis (May 23rd, 2018). Nox Vitae, by the Ukrainian-born, Estonia-resident Galina Grigorjeva, features in the Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir’s programme under Kaspars Putnins on January 31st. Its Dublin debut will see the return of Maxim Vengerov, who will conduct Johann Strauss’s Fledermaus Overture and Shostakovich’s Tenth Symphony, and take up his violin to play Bruch’s Violin Concerto No 1 and Saint-Saëns’s Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso with Karampini on the podium. It’s long past time to return to the more conventional layout. And none of the new developments has yet done anything to address that issue. After all, there’s probably a very good reason why stages are placed where they normally are. mdervan@irishtimes.com Last week’s announcement of the NCH’s 2017-18 International Concert Series revealed that the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra will open the series, on August 31st, with a programme of Peteris Vasks, …

A year after the Composing the Island outcry, women still barely register

The soundproofing provided by the two pairs of doors used by public and performers to enter and leave the room is risible. It’s long past time to return to the more conventional layout. The biggest problem, however, is the sound. After all, there’s probably a very good reason why stages are placed where they normally are. Full details and booking at nch.ie. Just one woman composer features in the programmes so far announced for the International Concert Series. But, a year on, the space is not satisfactory. Last May the announcement of the Composing the Island festival was followed by an outcry about the representation of women in that survey of 100 years of music in Ireland. It’s a pretty deadly effect, and the unfortunate outcome is that it makes performers seem insensitive to their listeners. And, still on the subject of noise, the air conditioning sometimes makes its presence pronounced for people seated in the back row. Last week’s announcement of the NCH’s 2017-18 International Concert Series revealed that the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra will open the series, on August 31st, with a programme of Peteris Vasks, Elgar (the Cello Concerto with Gautier Capuçon) and Rachmaninov under the orchestra’s Lithuanian music director, Mirga Gražinyte-Tyla. Gražinyte-Tyla will not be the season’s only woman conductor. It has been nicely spruced up, the lighting, seating and soundproofing have all been improved, and the dryness of the acoustic has been tempered. And none of the new developments has yet done anything to address that issue. Kevin Barry Recital Room: there’s a reason why stages usually go along the narrow axis. Those doors create other problems, too. Before renovation the intrusive noises came from outside the building, from passing traffic, wind and rain and, occasionally, the chatter of concertgoers taking the air during the interval at an event in the main auditorium. Then, in January, RTÉ announced Nathalie Stutzmann as principal guest conductor of the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra with effect from September. On June 12th, 2018, Stamatia Karampiniwill conduct the Würth Philharmoniker, an orchestra so new it has yet to give its first concert. The few concerts I’ve heard that used that layout seemed to benefit hugely from the change. mdervan@irishtimes.com The improvements have been obvious from the start. It was founded by Reinhold Würth “in an ongoing effort to build a cultural legacy both in German communities and across the world”. …

You are the chain, you are the prize, the jewels are within you

He gave me a hero when there were none.” “We are a vestige of that era,” says El-P. “A riot is the language of the unheard,” Martin Luther King said in 1968. “I have 50-year-old cousins who don’t listen to rap any more, who still look you firmly in the eye and say ‘Rakim: the greatest rapper ever’. This is free music, it’s folk music. I think I could go to an island in the middle of the Indian ocean and still write about Brooklyn: it’s everywhere I have known.” The writer John McGahern always maintained that the local is the universal. They were undeniably powerful. It’s a cool juxtaposition. Sometimes he did the more aggressive thing, when he did the up-tempo joints, but it was also so fucking well-written: it was elite poetry, elite.” El-P’s approach to writing is just as serious. The funny, arrogant, ‘fuck you’ side of Run the Jewels plays a really important role, because anyone can hit you with something that is thoughtful, that might make you cry, but you should be able to walk away from a song by Killer Mike talking some crazy shit, and feel like a badass.” “I tend to think we do give an answer: you’re free,” adds Mike. Jason Eady at ease with his world and his work on his assured sixth album Joey Bada$$ – All-Amerikkkan Badass album review: Living in a political world Prince kept opioids in aspirin bottles to hide addiction “I grew up in the south in the middle of the crack era, and it was fucked up, so being smart was secondary to being hard or rich. The idea was, thematically, that you are the chain, you are the prize, the jewels are within you.” Swagger This message was something they recently spread through Rookie magazine’s popular advice video series “Ask a Grown Man”, where they gave solid, comforting advice to teenage girls: essentially, to love yourself. Mike is the opposite: it’s spontaneous, he is thinking on his feet, tying the lines together, sometimes doing six in a row. “Being raised by my grandparents has helped me understand that you don’t have to be granted freedom. I saw characters like Spiderman, who was also a New Yorker, and people like Run-DMC, which changed the game for me, as they were the first guys who were dressed like regular people on the street. We can’t …