Dr Who is back in our dimension, and he’s hiring – quick, somebody call HR

(TV fact – Worzel Gummidge was played by the third Doctor, Jon Pertwee). Being a companion to the Doctor involves a lot of patiently repressing rage as an older man explains what’s what. These classes have also attracted the attention of Bill, who isn’t even a student in the college but works in the canteen where she overfeeds people she fancies (she’s the first gay companion, if you don’t count Jack Harkness, which because he’s not a young earth woman, we don’t). Then they go 23 million years into the future, which isn’t as impressive, to be honest. Fair enough, says she, and off they go.  Photograph: BBC The Doctor and Bill and Nardole (the aforementioned Matt Lucas) escape into the Tardis, the big blue box with which he navigates through time and space when he’s not navigating the UK educational system. The first episode of the new series is called “The Pilot”, which suggests a kind of reboot of the now 54-year-old television show, although it’s also an allusion to a plot point about an extra-terrestrial space-jockey. Wheelie dangerous The Doctor then decides to go to a planet where his arch enemies, the Daleks, are making a halmes of things. “There’s nothing wrong with that,” I imagine the Doctor’s HR department saying.“The younger pretty Earth women just happen to be the best candidates for the job… except on sporadic occasions when he prefers a robot dog, an omni-sexual space hunk or a portly alien cyborg” (Matt Lucas, also present in this episode). Wait, says Bill, is it ethically right for an elderly academic to tamper with the memories of a youthful female mentee on what is, essentially, a big-budget children’s television programme? I mean, of course, Doctor Who (Saturday, BBC1), who has now, like a cosmic Worzel Gummidge, changed heads 12 times. So Bill and the Heather-shaped sentient puddle share a sort of mind-melding telepathic moment. She seems nice enough. If I understand academia at all, this brings an unspoken subplot of the series to fruition: When will the ‘Doctor’ get a tenured university position? It’s Easter, and that means its time to celebrate someone who exists outside time and space and once came back from the dead to save mankind. It just wants a metaphysical hug. The puddle is a space puddle. This is the kind of thing you’d expect from Daleks (“Exterminate!” is their “Nice to see …

Easter Rising 2016: Commemorations mark 101st anniversary

Members of the 1916 Relatives Association took part in the annual ceremony which included poetry readings, song and seven children walking through the crowd a wreath and seven Easter lilies. Defence Forces Personnel, including a brass band and representatives of the Army, the Air Corps and the Naval Service will take part and it will conclude with an Air Corps fly past, if weather allows. On Saturday seven great-grandchildren of those who took part or died in the Easter Rising laid Easter Lilies in the Garden of Remembrance, Parnell Square. Meanwhile in Glasnevin wreath laying ceremonies took place at the Sigerson Monument and the graves of Edward Hollywood, the man who gave Ireland the first tricolour flag, and Peadar Kearney, the composer of Amhrán na bhFiann. At noon the National Flag will be lowered and the 1916 Proclamation will be read by an officer from the Defence Forces. Remembering the Rising: A special site dedicated to 1916 Commemorations are underway across the country to mark the 101st anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising. A Ceremony, led by President Michael D Higgins and Taoiseach Enda Kenny, will take place outside the GPO on O’Connell Street at 12pm.

Idlers of the world unite: Why the work ethic needs to be resisted

And is part of the problem that people struggle to find meaning outside of the workplace? “In today’s world of precarious work, the more dominant worry is how to survive, rather than how to achieve ‘work-life balance’. As automated technologies continue to replace the need for human workers, the need to do this refashioning will become increasingly urgent.” ******* Question: Any advice for the overworked? Others were trying to cope with the stigmatisation of their choices by seeking out kindred spirits in the form of critical writers or online communities.” Given you haven’t – yet – quit the labour market, how you achieve a work-life balance? “Having a job is routinely linked with ideas of happiness, success, maturity, and good character. Don’t stop asking questions Dear atheists, please stop calling religion a meme Can science ever tell us whether free will exists? “In this hyper-competitive context,” he writes, “it has almost become a matter of bad taste to fuss about issues like contracts, payment, and working conditions. Part of my motivation for the book was a feeling that there are enough life coaches and gurus in the world, and what we really need is a more political engagement with the problem. A lot of the people I met had to develop strategies to negotiate the perennial question: ‘what do you do?’. I would insist that overcoming these is not a question of how we can change as individuals or find personal ‘balance’, but of developing a collective struggle for shorter working hours and, eventually, a society where work is no longer at the centre of social relations. It is about the powerful social structures and moralities that keep workers in check. Even if you privately think that a lot of work is meaningless and feel secure in your belief of the virtues of working less, you are still likely to feel the usual social mores bearing down on you. “Depending on how far people want to go, resisting work means overcoming some significant barriers. “We must refashion society so that people can remain connected, active, and valued, even when their labour is not required by the formal economy. When people are afforded so little autonomy in their work, and when so much work has dubious value to society, it seems that a lot of us are actually finding our primary sources of meaning outside employment – in friendships, family, escapes …