Airline overbooking: a very bumpy flight

On Weibo, China’s equivalent of Twitter, the video garnered 270 million views and more than 150,000 comments. Sunday’s incident has cost it significant damage in its home market, knocked points off its shares and in China, where it hopes to make inroads, has been widely branded as racist. United executives poured flames on the controversy, by then viral on the internet, by refusing to apologise to the passenger whom chief executive Oscar Munoz described entirely falsely as “disruptive and belligerent”. But the passenger, an American-Chinese doctor, selected “at random” by airline staff to be bumped , said no. The Chicago Department of Aviation said in a statement that the incident “was not in accordance with our standard operating procedure” and that an officer summoned by the airline to evict the passenger had been placed on leave pending a review. United should follow suit. A spokesman said that “we asked several times, politely” for him to give up his seat before force was used. Who’s bumping who now? The practice of airlines systematically overbooking flights in the hope of filling as many seats as possible may be legal, but most certainly does not endear them to passengers. United, which also recently refused to allow a 10-year-old girl to board a flight for wearing leggings in “violation of its dress code”, should take a hard look at its customer care strategy. They even offered him up to $1,000 to give up the seat he was comfortably ensconced in to an airline employee, no less. True. And that should have been the end of the matter. And few regular travellers will not have been outraged at the sight of security officials dragging a screaming man by the arms down the aisle of a United Airlines flight at Chicago’s O’Hare Airport after he refused to be “bumped” from a flight to Louisville. And the international aviation authorities should prohibit involuntary “bumping” – either airlines should end overbooking, a fraud on consumers who naively believe they have been sold a seat on a particular flight, or they should be forced to offer sufficient compensation to induce volunteers.

Sylvia Plath letters reveal abuse by Ted Hughes

In his 1998 collection Howls and Whispers, Hughes quoted one of Barnhouse’s replies to Plath in September 1962, in the title poem: “And from your analyst: ‘Keep him out of your bed. The correspondence reveals a warm and open intimacy, as well as a shared sense of humour. Photograph: Everett/REX Shutterstock But as well as exposing her pain at the discovery of Hughes’s adultery, the most shocking passages reveal Plath’s accusation of physical abuse shortly before miscarrying their second child in 1961, in a letter dated September 22nd, 1962 – the same month the poets separated. Nine letters written after Plath discovered her husband’s infidelity with their neighbour, Assia Wevill, in July 1962, form the core of the collection. Plath’s treatment with Barnhouse ended when the poet moved to England but the two shared a close friendship, which has long been of interest to scholars because of their affection for one another. Though Plath had a history of depression and had attempted suicide a number of times previously, she did not tell Hughes about her struggles with mental health until some time after their marriage. These include the lines in Daddy: “I made a model of you, / A man in black with a Meinkampf look / And a love of the rack and the screw.” Plath wrote to her mother during this period: “I am writing the best poems of my life. The book was his final riposte to the feminist critics who, in the 1970s, spoke out against Hughes over his treatment of Plath. Written between February 18th, 1960 and February 4th, 1963, a week before her death, the letters cover a period in Plath’s life that has remained elusive to readers and scholars. Rosenstein maintains she was given the letters 47 years ago by Barnhouse. It was targeted by vandals who removed his name. Court case The archive first came to the attention of Plath scholars after a rare books seller advertised it online for sale on behalf of Rosenstein, with the collection also featured as part of the New York antiquarian book fair in March. In 2010, Hughes’s apparent final word on the turbulent relationship was published in the form of his poem Last Letter, which described what happened in the three days before his wife died. Plath scholars hailed the letters and archive as a remarkable source of new information about Plath, whose collected letters …

A literary treasure map of Trinity College Dublin

The official opening, by Mary Robinson, will take place at 10.30am on Wednesday, April 12th, in the Trinity Long Room Hub. Separateness can seem like exclusion, and in Trinity’s case these words have long held meanings in which ideas of place – of boundaries which mark the distance, and the difference, between what is inside and out – carry the heavy load of history and politics. See remappingtrinity.wordpress.com for more details. Remapping Trinity: A Literary Atlas of the University has been organised by Julie Bates and Rosie Lavan, both lecturers in the School of English in Trinity College Dublin. The first, on Trinity’s History and Collections, will feature contributions from the historian David Dickson, the architectural historian Edward McParland, and Jane Maxwell, principal curator in the Old Library at Trinity. Taking the ideas of writers and theorists like Solnit, Iain Sinclair and Franco Moretti, we wanted to explore questions about how we experience and understand place and space, by exploring Trinity itself. Events are taking place all day on April 12th and 13th as part of the official programme for Trinity Week 2017. Remapping Trinity: A Literary Atlas of the University offers creative and scholarly engagements with the site of the College, and its place within the city. The programme also includes scholarly reflections in a pair of roundtable discussions with experts from a range of disciplines and departments in Trinity. People can also explore the campus individually, taking a specially curated audio tour, prepared by postgraduate students in collaboration with the artist Fiona Hallinan. She has described a city as “a machine with innumerable parts made by the accumulation of human gestures”. Our chief guides have been the writers who have approached and represented Trinity through historical accounts, memoir, fiction and poetry, linking it with the city, the country, and the world beyond its walls. Remapping Trinity seeks to follow the paths between those entrances and exits, and to invite people to construct their own understanding of the place in doing so. The writer Rebecca Solnit has recently created a series of inventive atlases of American cities. Our chief guides have been the writers who have approached and represented Trinity through historical accounts, memoir, fiction and poetry, linking it with the world beyond its walls With all this in mind, we began to wonder how we might remap Trinity – in other words, how we might understand this place differently …

17-year-old’s detailed portrait of brother wins Texaco art prize

I think there is a pureness to it… Five awards Lucy, a pupil at Gaelcholáiste Cheatharlach in Co Carlow who plays minor football for Co Laois, has now won five Texaco awards. Self-portraits and jellyfish Ava Henson (11), who won top prize in her category, is another serial winner having previously taken first and second places in her category. “He has such a pretty face to draw or paint, I have done a number of portraits before.” Her mother, Fionnuala Ballance, was an artist at the Sullivan Bluth animation studios in Dublin and ensured her children had a plentiful supply of paper and crayons at the kitchen table in their home in Luggacurren. Mother Leonie and father Dan are both National College of Art and Design (NCAD) graduates and the girls’ art supplies arrive regularly in the post courtesy of their grandfather. Even in an age of technology, children flock to paints and pencil with about 10 digital entrants in any given year. Her siblings have also accumulated prizes in a competition which continues to attract thousands of entrants every year. Like the Deegan family, the Hensons have a strong artistic spirit. Lucy’s pencil strokes won her €1,500 and a trip to Tokyo to display her work at the International Foundation for Arts and Culture. “They are still going back into very traditional means. Past winners have taken the award into careers in art and design – Graham Knuttal, Paul Costello and Robert Ballagh among them. There were 126 prizes in seven categories. This year she drew the judges’ attention for her striking self-portrait in pencil, while younger sister Esmé (8) took a special merit for her depiction of a king jellyfish. a charm,” said Bronagh Carron, Texaco marketing manager. It is more than a decade since she secured her first special merit as a four-year-old in what has long established itself as Ireland’s greatest celebration of emerging artistic talent. Artistic talent runs deep in the Deegan family from Co Laois, who are no strangers to collecting awards. This year, 17-year-old Lucy snatched the ultimate prize as overall winner of the 63rd Texaco Children’s Art Competition. “I thought it was such a pretty photo because Tom is at his happiest in the summertime,” she said, doting on her sibling while holding the large framed portrait at the winner’s reception. Her winning piece Tom – Summer is a detailed pencil drawing …

You can’t tell an ‘after the fall’ story without a fall

Home Again for the First Time was my second go at a title. Now it should be noted that, while I may sound like I know what the hell I’m talking about, I had a teacher at school tell me that I’d never be a writer. One thing I’d learned from writing the “Life with Multiple Sclerosis” blog for EverydayHealth.com for over a decade was that starting with a title can be directive, the way laying down a trackline on a chart helped me sail difficult waters in my days as a US Coast Guard navigator. (John Cusack plays me, by the way, and “pertinent” but “reluctant” would be my stage direction). An American chef with multiple sclerosis moves to Ireland … and gets a puppy. It is available from all good bookshops and online from collinspress.ie/chef-interrupted Though my ancestry can be traced to Ireland, it’s Co Fermanagh whence my people come, not west Kerry where the book is set. That seemed to encompass what I thought readers of the book would take away but seemed more like a ham-handed sales strategy of appealing to the widest possible audience – the foodies, the diaspora, the MS and chronic illness community and, of course, who doesn’t love a good story about a dog? For better than 20 years I believed her and abandoned a pastime that was budding into passion. Loves, passions, tastes, and appetites can be sated or tantalised; satisfied, or fascinated. As a chef I used to tell staff or students as we would prepare for a busy dinner service, “We’ll either run out of customers, out of food or out of time.” What I realised in reading my own memoir was that I hadn’t yet run out of any of them. This title didn’t end up working because, as I wrote and edited the first draft, I realised that: 1) it wasn’t a fall – I had actually been knocked down by the debilitating disease and 2) the story of life since MS has me being knocked over and over again. Now that the book has won an international literary award and is being published in my adopted country, I have to wonder why I gave a mediocre educator so much power over my young life. It is a view seen by anyone who has been knocked to the ground by any outside force as they mustered the …

The hero who averted nuclear catastrophe

This culminated in the book Yoshida’s Dilemma: One Man’s Struggle to Avert Nuclear Catastrophe. I hadn’t sufficiently prepared myself for such sights, or indeed the scale of devastation that the disasters had wrought on coastal Tohoku when I headed up there from Tokyo on the morning of March 12th with two journalist friends. Yoshida, who retired from the plant in late 2012 after being diagnosed with oesophageal cancer, has widely been afforded hero status for his leading role in averting a far more devastating catastrophe. Likewise the teenaged boy in Rikuzentakata, shovel in hand, searching among the rubble for his brother, or the pathos of a scene where a military official returned a slipper to the foot of a man as his limp, lifeless body was unloaded from a truck and transported to a makeshift morgue inside a high school gym. Over the weeks, months and years that followed, I continued to visit the devastated area in an attempt to uncover the story of the nuclear disaster from the standpoint of those who had battled away to fight it and those who had been forced to flee from it. More than six years have passed since the earthquake and tsunami struck the Tohoku region of northern Japan, yet memories of that time still haunt me. Nor for that matter, had I given much thought to a third, more insidious danger that soon began to unfold. As he relayed the welcome news that he and his young family were safe, his voice took an unusually alarmed tone. Yoshida and a large cast of workers and fire-fighters battled courageously to prevent a potentially world-changing disaster. Some researchers, such as Geraldine Thomas, a cancer specialist at London University, insist that the radiation levels seen at Fukushima are too low to bring about the high numbers of thyroid and other cancers that were among the more prominent illnesses to come to light in the decades after Chernobyl. Most famously, he defied official orders to stop using seawater to cool the melting reactors, one of many dilemmas he faced throughout the lengthy ordeal. A literal translation of its name would be “Lucky Island”, but little did I know that Fukushima was about to become a place synonymous with nuclear catastrophe. The local news was reporting that there had been an explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station about 50 miles away from where we …

Ed Sheeran settles €19m copyright infringement lawsuit

Sheeran’s single Photograph, from his album x (Multiply), reached number 10 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and number 15 in the UK singles chart in 2014. “This copying is, in many instances, verbatim, note-for-note copying; makes up nearly one half of Photograph, and raises this case to the unusual level of strikingly similar copying.” DJ Krystal Klear: ‘The mental health issues in my industry are through the roof’ The Hot 8 Brass Band – On the Spot album review: New Orleans jazz at its finest Prince mysteries: who are his heirs and where did he get the drugs? Court order An order signed by Judge James Selna at a California court on Monday said the case was dismissed after an agreement had been reached between the parties. Songwriters Thomas Leonard and Martin Harrington had sued the Thinking Out Loud singer, accusing him of “unabashedly taking credit” for their work. In a complaint lodged in the US in July, they said Sheeran and his songwriting partner, Johnny McDaid from Snow Patrol, had “copied and exploited, without authorisation or credit, the work of other active, professional songwriters on a breathtaking scale. Leonard and Harrington were represented by Richard Busch, the lawyer who helped the family of Marvin Gaye win a copyright infringement case in 2015. Cardle’s track Amazing peaked at number 84 in the UK singles chart in 2012. Harrington, who has written hits for Kylie Minogue, 5ive and Emma Bunton, and Leonard sued for damages in excess of $20 million. Details of the settlement were not revealed in the court papers. Gaye’s family successfully sued Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams over their single Blurred Lines, winning a $7.4 million settlement. Ed Sheeran has reached a deal to end a $20 million (about €19 million) lawsuit over his hit song Photograph. PA The British music star was accused of “note-for-note” copying from a track called Amazing that was released by former X Factor winner Matt Cardle in 2012.

Whatever happened to child beauty queen JonBenét Ramsey?

“It’s a film about individual interpretations, so I don’t really want to impose a meaning on it,” she says. “Americans love to talk,” says Green. And I blurted out JonBenét Ramsey without even thinking about it.” The 32-year-old documentarian was “10 or 11” when JonBenét Ramsey’s body was discovered: “I was fascinated by it,” she says. As soon as you put them in front of a camera they know what to do. Last year, various competing TV projects – JonBenét: An American Murder Mystery, The Killing of JonBenét: The Truth Uncovered, and a three-part interview on Dr Phil with Burke Ramsey, JonBenét’s brother – were unveiled to mark the 20th anniversary of her death. Did her enraged mother kill her for wetting the bed? But it was really quite organic. We got a lot of weird emails from people when they found out we were making the film. The cultural history and the mythology interested me more so than the whodunit?” Throughout the production, the filmmaker kept an open mind, but she does have some ideas pertaining to the story’s longevity. “That’s something I found out quickly. They also received an apology from the Boulder DA’s office and from the makers of South Park, who had lampooned the couple in a 2001 episode. There’s a lot going on in their minds. They immediately connected it to their own lives. Burke was also cleared by touch DNA evidence in 2008. We haven’t had any negative reactions. And I heard a Louis CK joke about casting little girls for Schindler’s List on some late-night TV show. The case has, additionally, attracted odd individuals, including the paedophile John Mark Karr, who confessed to the crime in 2006 only to be ruled out as an attention-seeker. A lot of processing. Some of them were just too out there, others were too scary. “We interviewed 200 people and almost everyone who sat down would immediately speculate about the mother. Two decades later the unsolved murder of the child beauty queen continues to generate headlines and conspiracy theories. They live in the shadow of a case that will never be closed.” One alarming coping mechanism quickly emerges. The discovery of a “dark animal hair” on JonBenét’s person has inspired various wild animal theories. This is a portrait of a community coping with an unsolvable crime “This is a portrait of a community coping with an unsolvable …

Krystal Klear: ‘The mental health issues in my industry are through the roof’

A year passes like that and things get booked so far in advance now, if your agent isn’t in the mix, or isn’t savvy enough to be able to get you on the platform, you’ll be watching people pass you by.” Having started as a producer first, Lennon always wanted to be Quincy Jones, to make albums. If I had kept doing that, I wouldn’t have been able to look at myself in the mirror.” Krystal Klear performs at District 8, Dublin on Easter Sunday April 16th It’s affected me dramatically. It’s like a car accident, no one really knows who to blame,” he says. All of these things can be strategically laid out which when I was coming up, just wasn’t a thing. “If Larry Levan produced The Pet Shop Boys” is how he describes the album, which will likely be released in 2018. Your failure to advance in your own career is reflected in the perceived success of others. “Whether they’re happy or not is irrelevant. The next thing I know, every mad hatter label is asking me to do ‘something like the Sky Ferreira thing on our label’. I saw through that. “I see it with tons of my peers. Be aware of who your agent is and what they’re doing. “The mental health issues in my industry are through the roof,” says Lennon. DJing was a distraction that occupy his main focus no longer. Key to its development, is Lennon’s quest to maintain his authenticity, something he’s been confronted with when his remix for Sky Ferreira, which was unexpectedly popular. Somebody is going to have to co-sign it, to push it, to give it that platform so that people will think ‘wow, this is the one’. Lennon has gone through five different ones over the years and says his career struggled because of bad booking agents but often the relationship is a tenuous one, particularly if a career isn’t going according to plan. “If you have a really good track, that’s fantastic, congratulations but someone is going to have to play it. “My advice is to be aware of every move you’re making. He’s currently focused on finally finishing his debut album which involves trying to whittle down 487 recorded songs of various styles into a cohesive whole. I did a mix for Fact Magazine in 2011 and it got really big feedback and was featured …

DJ Krystal Klear: ‘The mental health issues in my industry are through the roof’

It was great to make money and that some people might recognise me and think what I was doing is cool “It’s like ‘get your photo taken in front of Panorama Bar’, boost the post; record a mix at this famous spot and put it online and boost the post. They seem to be doing things and you’re not and that’s where you’re head goes and before you know it, you’re walking around with a gloom of cloud around your head all day.” Despite these dangerous methods of self-promotion, Lennon believes quality ultimately breaks through, citing recent breakthroughs for Shanti Celeste and Leon Vynehall as examples. “The mental health issues in my industry are through the roof,” says Lennon. “If people know you, they know what you like, you don’t need to show up to a DJ set and get everyone to go on their honkers and jump up to the beat. If I had kept doing that, I wouldn’t have been able to look at myself in the mirror.” Krystal Klear performs at District 8, Dublin on Easter Sunday April 16th Somebody is going to have to co-sign it, to push it, to give it that platform so that people will think ‘wow, this is the one’. Don’t hurry or rush into any decision. A year passes like that and things get booked so far in advance now, if your agent isn’t in the mix, or isn’t savvy enough to be able to get you on the platform, you’ll be watching people pass you by.” Having started as a producer first, Lennon always wanted to be Quincy Jones, to make albums. It’s like a car accident, no one really knows who to blame,” he says. He suggests that, now more than ever, DJs and producers have to be recommended and played by an established tastemaker DJ to accelerate their career. I did a mix for Fact Magazine in 2011 and it got really big feedback and was featured in their the end of the year mix list. Lennon has gone through five different ones over the years and says his career struggled because of bad booking agents but often the relationship is a tenuous one, particularly if a career isn’t going according to plan. “I see it with tons of my peers. Now, if that happened to me tomorrow, I’d have my management make more of a deal of …

The 32 Irish merchant sailors enslaved by the Nazis

Forgotten Hero of Bunker Valentin – The Harry Callan Story is an authentic eyewitness account of a POW in Nazi Germany. Funded by the British Legion, it enabled former POWs to return to the places of their incarceration for the annual liberation commemoration ceremonies. For more than two years, we worked long hours; researching, editing and fine tuning my manuscript. It is available in all good bookshops and online from https://www.collinspress.ie/forgotten-hero-of-bunker-valentin.html While on this trip to Bremen-Farge, Germany, Harry, one of 32 Irish-born British Merchant seamen, discovered that there were no records of him or his fellow Irishmen at the camp. An official photograph showing prisoners working on the construction of Bunker Valentin during the second World War The result is Harry’s story, written in his own voice, as I heard it on those tapes. This information and the trauma of Harry’s recurrent nightmares were all his family knew. That is why, when RTÉ radio’s Documentary on One recorded his return to Germany, they called the programme Clouds in Harry’s Coffee. I travelled to Germany with Harry, visiting the places of his incarceration: Stalag XB Sandbostel; Milag Nord Westertimke; Bunker Valentin Bremen-Farge and the former Arbeitserziehungslager (Labour Education Camp). We made a pact: he would forget that I was his daughter-in-law and tell me everything; the good, the bad and the unspeakable and I would be true to his words, at all times. Some mornings I braced myself for what I had to hear, particularly the harrowing experiences that Harry recounted. It has been my privilege to visit Germany with him to witness the forgiveness and compassion he has for the German people; his interaction with the young students of the region and in turn, their respect and love for him. The three pipes to his left pump cement to the waiting prisoners above In January 2012, at the age of 88, Harry realised that he was the last survivor of the 32 and that, if he did not speak now, what happened to them would never be known, so I agreed to record his words. We quickly learned that it was not a subject for discussion. By 10am we were ready for a coffee break; coffee plays a significant role in Harry’s life. Eventually, by June 2014 I had the bones of a story that definitely needed to be told and I sought the help of my friend, Helen …

A literary treasure map of Trinity College

People can also explore the campus individually, taking a specially curated audio tour, prepared by postgraduate students in collaboration with the artist Fiona Hallinan. All events are free and everyone is warmly welcome to attend and participate. Mary Robinson, Chancellor of the University of Dublin, will launch Remapping Trinity with a special reading of Liffeytown, an early poem by her Trinity contemporary Eavan Boland Mary Robinson, Chancellor of the University of Dublin, will launch Remapping Trinity with a special reading of Liffeytown, an early poem by her Trinity contemporary Eavan Boland. The programme also includes scholarly reflections in a pair of roundtable discussions with experts from a range of disciplines and departments in Trinity. See remappingtrinity.wordpress.com for more details. Workshop sessions will enable participants to explore these ideas in practice: one workshop, on Reading Place, will be led by Niamh NicGhabhann of the University of Limerick, and the other, on Writing Place, by the writer and academic Nathan O’Donnell. We think it is vitally important to include the voices and perspectives of students, who continually reinvent the university through their engagement with it, and to bring this youthful creative energy to bear on already-recorded ideas and texts, written over many centuries, that have already shaped the identity of the university. Franco Moretti encourages readers of his Atlas of the European Novel to think of the maps in that book as “points of departure” because “a good map should allow for more than one line of thought” and provoke “a further array of interpretive paths: towards a text, a critical idea, a historical thesis.” If we understand Trinity as a city within a city, we begin to see that there are many points of departure for the map-maker and for the map-reader: many ways in – and many ways out. The events and activities of these two days will together form a set of phenomenological maps, by which participants can navigate and engage with Trinity, and reflect on the ways in which they make sense of space, as they devise, adapt and reinforce their own imaginative maps beyond the walls of the university. Taking the ideas of writers and theorists like Solnit, Iain Sinclair and Franco Moretti, we wanted to explore questions about how we experience and understand place and space, by exploring Trinity itself. Participants will be invited to explore Trinity as members of the audience of a promenade theatre …

‘Weirder than Twin Peaks’: The unsolved murder of a child beauty queen

They immediately connected it to their own lives. So that’s nice.” And having spent so much time listening to competing theories, has Green got one of her own? Did Green happen upon individuals or hypotheses that were simply too outlandish to make the final cut? “Especially the beauty pageant aspect. “We were very honest and upfront about what we wanted to do from the start. “There were definitely weirder theories. John and Patsy name him in their book The Death of Innocence. Patsy was a pageant mother and a former beauty queen. There is something particularly discombobulating about the level of misogyny displayed – by both men and women – and channelled, with no little venom, towards Patsy Ramsey. Michael Helgoth Had a history of sexual abuse and was in the area when JonBenét was murdered. I went in with a very open mind, with more questions than answers, and I came out none the wiser.”  Casting JonBenét launches April 28th on Netflix   Some of the various suspects in the case John and Patsy Ramsey Despite years of scurrilous tabloid headlines, Patsy and John Ramsey were cleared by touch DNA evidence in 2008. They were just going on bits and pieces they had heard around the town or city or things they had read in the tabloids. “I’m interested in exploration, not conclusions. “We shot a few bits and pieces afterwards but I’m not sure it changed people’s opinions that radically,” says Green. Sometimes unprompted, they discuss why they think Patsy (or John, or their son, Burke, or a local paedophile) killed JonBenét. A huge number of the actors came to the premiere at Sundance and they were all thrilled with it. One popular theory suggests that JonBenét lives on as pop superstar Katy Perry. And even those who think that the brother was involved still point to the mother as being involved in the cover-up. Another postulates a strange corporeal revenge, as they connect the imagined dots between Patsy Ramsey’s alleged “coldness”, JonBenét’s death and Patsy’s death in 2006 from ovarian cancer. We got a lot of weird emails from people when they found out we were making the film. So we didn’t include them. As with his late mother, many viewers were quick to deride the young man, now aged 29, for smiling during the interview about his sister’s death. It was amazing how quickly people were to …

The management consultant who took her own advice and made the move into art

The teenagers were not in their rooms but their personalities were fully in evidence. “We were working on long-term planning and we did it by saying, think of yourself 10 years hence, and then work backwards.” At home that evening, chatting to her partner (who is Irish) she thought of applying that to their own lives. Originally from Boston, she obtained a BSc at Babson College Massachusetts, an MBA at Columbia and then worked in management consultancy. The subjects of the middle years – “I was thinking, you’ve moved away from your parents, you may have children, but you are not yet a grandparent” – are vendors on Venice Beach in California. That preoccupation began with a work for a previous show, Not Sorry at the Drogheda gallery in 2014. The set-up might appear haphazard but has an anarchic order. It was incredibly fulfilling for them.” The show also includes a video of members of the Macushla Dance Club who meet weekly at DanceHouse in Foley Street, Dublin. The vendors operate on plots opposite the conventional shopfronts. “What I didn’t expect was that my prior life would start to seep into my art work.” She found herself devising projects utilising analytical and statistical methods. “I’m mainly interested in cognitive function and wellbeing.” A number of concise, printed, declarative statements form part of Trying to Behave and more will be incorporated in the subsequent shows. A different strand of work feeds into each but there is an underlying concern with wellbeing. Gradually she became reconciled to this. They are dealing with stuff in their lives. “What struck me was that it was such a positive, joyful occasion. Aoife Ruane, director of the Highlanes Gallery in Drogheda, is curating the three shows under the collective title Just a Bit Extraordinary, which will be at the Highlanes later in the year. It was a slippery slope: now she’s in the final year of a degree course in psychology at UCD. “At that stage of your life,” as Nanigian sees it, “you are usually preoccupied with earning a living. Each line begins with ‘I am .. Isolated against black backgrounds, impeccably costumed and poised, they are tea dance royalty, utterly committed to what they are doing. And the vendors on Venice Beach are an extreme example of that”. Interlopers would not be tolerated. The show will include a soundscape based on recordings made on …

Anne Enright only Irish contender for Dublin literary award

Yet the danger appears to come from within. Published by Faber & Faber. Norton. Viet Thanh Nguyen, the author of The Sympathizer. Cue the outrages committed in the name of religion in this ponderous yet addictive read. The Green Road by Anne Enright (Irish ) Published by Jonathan Cape & W.W. Golden age Valeria Luiselli, author of The Story of my Teeth.  Mexican writing is enjoying a golden age, and Valeria Luiselli’s The Story of My Teeth is playful and confident. A plaintive beauty shapes Austrian Robert Seethaler’s elegiac A Whole Life, which is translated by Charlotte Collins. The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen (Vietnamese/American) First novel. Translated by Ekin Oklap, it is Dickensian in execution, an everyman marshmallow of a saga more to love than admire. Shortlisted for the Man Booker International prize, the small human tragedy of one lonely man already has a huge readership. This year’s shortlist, six of which are in translation, is drawn from 149 titles nominated by 109 libraries in 40 countries. It features seven men and three women and includes few surprises. This is an inspired choice from the judging panel and, with six of the 10 books in translation, it has certainly testified to the quality of international fiction. It is a profound and demanding work of art. Anne Enright is the only Irish finalist with The Green Road. Enright is a shrewd and unflinching observer of human behaviour. Nigeria’s Chinelo Okparanta confronts the legacy of war in Under the Udala Trees which is the story of two girls in love. Most of the books have already been widely celebrated and one of them, The Sympathizer by Vietnamese American Viet Thanh Nguyen, won the Pulitzer Prize and is already an international bestseller. Place your bets on this likely winner, as Nguyen looks to Catch-22 and beyond. Turkish writer and 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature winner Orhan Pamuk’s A Strangeness in My Mind is a meandering, likable and complacent reiteration of his favourite theme, his love of Istanbul. On a wider level it is also about the emergence of Nigeria; the vision is bold, yet the prose can be flat. Published by Grove/Atlantic & Corsair. The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli (Mexican) Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Christina MacSweeney. Photograph: Oriana Koren/The New York Times The Vietnam war in all its squalor is revisited with satiric panache. Published by Picador. …