Donal Dineen’s Sunken Treassure: Jonathan Richman – I, Jonathan (1992)

It was released in 1976 and placed The Modern Lovers at the vanguard of an emererging proto-punk sound. A beautiful one. He had a fine-tuned ear for the poetics of language. His extraordinary knack for finding his way to the heart of the matter and then the perfect words to turn them into songs was his greatest talent. Richman was intent on turning back but he had found himself a following so he went with it for a little while and surfed the big wave. Jonathan Richman is an enigma. A better song about the fleeting magic and inherent tragedy of those transient glory days you will not find. Band members speak with some frustration about his hesitation and wild about-turns, but always with a degree of fondness too. At the turn of the decade, Richman was ready to leave the brash days behind and explore a quieter sound with the lyrics taking centre stage. Change and evolution was his thing. That Summer Feeling was written and released in 1984, but didn’t appear on an album until 1992. He wears his heart on his sleeve. It leaves you wishing you were a little wiser back then, taking some time to breathe it all in before it was gone. He tempers the beautiful innocence and joie de vivre (that hovers throughout the song with the weight of experience). He could have startded off in a blaze of glory with The Modern Lovers, hanging out with his heroes The Velvet Underground and having John Cale produce their debut LP, but he seemed to have spent a lot of time putting out that fire rather than adding any fuel to it. His path and the truth always had to be aligned. His doubts were unfounded. He wasn’t the first musician to notice the faultlines in the machinations of the music industry, but he was one of the first to actively speak out against it. Around about the time he recorded Roadruner with Cale in 1972, he started to have doubts about the loose guitar sound, crashing drums and barely sung vocals that made it so disctinctive. The truth is never far away in any one of his many types of songs. He wasn’t a man for churning out verions of what he’d done before.

Dear atheists, please stop calling religion a meme

In fact, I’ve found that in an undergraduate class a careful reading of Dawkins’s arguments against God’s existence generally does more to move students away from atheism than does a careful reading of Aquinas’s proofs for God’s existence.” What’s the best argument for belief in God, in your view? There’s no reason to think that, say, the well-educated and reflective believers, of whom there are many, are driven by such simple causes. But many believers also have a commitment to their religion as a valuable way of understanding the world and their place in it. A popular way in which atheists try to explain religious belief is to label it a “meme”. That’s the residue of agnosticism in my Catholicism.” ASK A SAGE Question: If you don’t like theism, atheism or agnosticism, is there something else you can believe in? Faith is crucial in human life-almost everything we believe about science and history, for example, is based on what others have told us is true. The idea, advanced by evolutionary scientist Richard Dawkins, is that memes are units for transmitting cultural behaviour or beliefs, and they spread or “self-replicate” through the population in a manner analogous to genes in biology. Nor would it make sense to say that we know the Pope and bishops are reliable just because they themselves say they are. And-for those with worldviews not limited by the dogma of scientific materialism-such experiences may be rightly seen as real possibilities. Many people have strongly sensed the presence of an extraordinarily good and powerful invisible person who cares about them. “There are two problems here. They’re merely hand-waving sketches of how belief might arise: for example, fear of death, social survival-value of shared myths. the Pope, the bishops – as opposed to knowing from your own experience or reasoning. “The reliability of an experience also depends on how well it fits in with other experiences that I and others have and with my overall worldview. They have a practical commitment to their religion but not necessarily any views about its intellectual significance. George Carlin replies: “Frisbeetarianism… First, the explanations are not detailed causal accounts of how people actually come to believe. It would be the height of foolishness to believe what the Pope and bishops tell us unless we knew that they were trustworthy witnesses. So, for example, the views of human existence we find in Jane Austen …

The other war poets and the other revolution

Unable to deal with the 90 wounded men left in his care, he killed himself with a cocaine overdose. Hans Arp, Paul Klee, Hugo Ball, and later Kandinsky and Picabia gave birth to a movement called Dada. Apolllinaire’s war poetry is remarkable for its deadpan approach, as in the poem There is… Now that we have commemorated the 1916 Rising and are in the midst of commemorating Irish participation in the first World War, we should not lose sight of the fact that what was happening in the publishing houses, studios, cabarets and cafes of Europe is just as much part of our cultural heritage. In Vienna, the composer Arnold Schoenberg, who was experimenting with atonality, said that he was doing to classical music what the German army was doing to France. As General Maxwell engaged in practical poetry criticism, another kind of rebellion was going on all over Europe, not just in poetry, but in music and the visual arts. Georg Trakl was a neurotic pharmacist from Austria who was serving as a medical orderly on the Galician front in 1914. Apollinaire joined the army in 1914, and as an artillery officer fought in Verdun, was wounded and died in 1918, but not before writing a book of formally-innovative poetry inspired by his experiences, called Calligrammes. 1916 – A Revolutionary Cabaret, compiled by Michael O’Loughlin and Judith Mok, featuring poetry by Trakl, Apollinaire, Blok, Hugo Ball, Osip Mandelstam and music by Poulenc, Satie, Shostakovich, Stravinsky, Kurt Weill and De Falla, performed by Judith Mok, Dermot Dunne, Nick Roth, Dominica Williams, Kate Ellis, Elaine Clarke and Maire Saaritsa, takes place on Monday, April 10th at 7.30 in St Laurence’s Church, Grangegorman, Dublin By Easter 1916, however, the main German-language poet of the war was already dead. One of the most fascinating figures in twentieth-century poetry was Guillaume Apollinaire. As Pearse et al were entering the GPO, Hugo Ball was going on stage wearing a strange costume and chanting: jolifanto bambla o falli bambla großiga m’pfa habla horem egiga goramen Poetry which was basically nonsensical, in every European language. Prewar Vienna had been called “a laboratory for the end of the world”, but it was in Zurich that European culture was being taken apart. The unprecedented carnage of the first World War was having a devastating effect on the minds of young men in France, Germany, Austria and Russia. His dark, …