Crime pays, from academia to bestseller lists

Other Irish writers – Claire McGowan on the Irish crossroads of religion and sexuality, or Alan Glynn on international corruption, or Declan Hughes on returning to a changed Dublin in which one is now an outsider – similarly demonstrate the genre’s capacity for serious moral engagement on scales from the intimate to the global. This would surprise Trinity literature students whose four-year degree – as is also often true for our many visiting literature students from the States – includes a compulsory grounding in Chaucer, Shakespeare, Burke, Goldsmith, Wordsworth, Yeats and many others. Advocating for his former student – the lauded novelist Michael Collins – William O’Rourke asserts that Collins “asks too much of a reader” in a diminished literary culture. Collins may well be correct in his assertion that a “litany of exceptions” hardly proves that literary fiction sells in large quantities. Dr Brian Cliff, Assistant Professor of Irish Studies in the School of English at TCD (currently on leave), is currently completing his book Irish Crime Fiction: An Introduction, for Palgrave ADVERTISEMENT An informed assessment by an experienced writer like O’Rourke should have no need to dismiss entire genres as talentless (a point concisely made in these pages by a novelist no less cerebral than John Banville). This is where some of the most interesting experiments take place. Stones? Whatever the limitations of bestseller charts, they suggest Living White Men are hardly an endangered species at bookstore registers. Sweeping generalisations have their entertaining role in late-night pub debate – Beatles vs. – but he again derides “the mob of crime writers out there”, who unlike Collins are not “hampered by too much talent”. Ian Sansom, Trinity’s Professor of Creative Practice and a writer in several genres including crime, understands this: “Some of the most brilliant, insightful, challenging and exciting literature being written – and indeed which has ever been written – just happens to be crime fiction and science fiction. Other critically and commercially successful Living White Males like Michael Chabon and Dave Eggers continue to define their art in part by skipping merrily past genre distinctions. This breadth is just as true of recent Irish crime fiction. Her book, Late Victorian Crime Fiction in the Shadows of Sherlock (Palgrave, 2015) won the HRF Keating Prize. Even a cursory glance at American charts, with non-fiction like JD Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Dear Ijeawele sitting alongside …

Dancing With the Stars: Why the best dancer didn’t win

Jedward were entertaining – albeit irritating – characters, and they challenged the notion of what we consider entertainment. And then there’s the occasional novelty act who is two cha-chas short of a full routine. They can’t dance but they seem like they’re having fun. McCormack and Garrihy have a real chance at becoming professional dancers, as does boyband star Dayl Cronin and the entertainment was watching them improve each week. As a dancer, he wasn’t car-crash telly but he won’t be handing in his garda badge for a life on the road with Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games either. The BBC’s voting figures are top secret so that they do not affect the contestants or sway future results, but previous Strictly winners tend to be people with an existing fanbase, like Olympic athletes, soap stars and pop artists. To paraphrase Adele’s disbelief when she won the award for Album of the Year over Beyoncé at this year’s Grammy Awards, what the **** do they have to do to win Dancing with the Stars? We had RTÉ news reporter Teresa Mannion, comedian Katherine Lynch, RTÉ sports broadcaster Des Cahill, former Home Town singer Dayl Cronin, Garrihy, McCormack and O’Mahony. They eventually came in sixth but it’s fair to say that they achieved considerable more success (Eurovision, Celebrity Big Brother, fame in Japan) than the series winner Joe McElderry. With the introduction of the “Dreaded Dance Off” in week eight, where the bottom two dancers competed for the judges’ approval, some order was restored to the unpredictable votes, as the judges made the final call on who went home. As for political candidates? ADVERTISEMENT The O’Donovan Brothers might have a 2-for-1 offer going. We should know by the end of the summer who desperately needs the public vote. If they want pop stars, we’ve plenty of retirees sitting around twiddling their thumbs. The public vote – a key part of the programme’s commercial basis – makes the show a popularity contest, not a talent show. What’s Boyzone’s Mikey Graham up to? And because changing to a purely talent-based victory could reduce the profit margin, well, it’s not likely to happen. DWTS is based on BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing. But keeping Jedward on in a singing competition is different to keeping on Aidan O’Mahony in a dancing competition. In the final, McCormack scored 90 out of 90 points altogether for her three …

Pop Corner boyband special with Zayn, Harry, Liam and, ahem, Ronan Keating

All will be revealed, apparently, on April 7th. Bored of our muso analogies? Who knows). I’m sure we’ll mark it in some way. Keep an ear out for the killer line, ‘Do you like my fabric? Yeah, I’m boyfriend material’, and remember it for your next night out. In a video clip shown on ITV, piano music plays (is this a hint to the sound?) and Harry is soaking wet (is this a scene-setting moment, or a nod to the lyrics?) and he walks to an open door (another clue? There’s a bouncy guitar line and syncopated hi-hats, providing a welcome departure from the all-encompassing tropical house vibe. We’ll ease in by discussing Zayn’s new hi-life influenced single. “I’m completely in awe of his incredible mother and how she has been the whole way through this, she’s really made my dreams come true. TRACK OF THE WEEK Zayn feat The Party Next Door – Still Got Time Welcome to our boyband special. It’s such a long time and so much has happened. It’s going to be a proper moment for pop music.” ADVERTISEMENT Now Click Here: To watch Sia tell everyone on Sesame Street about the letter S Zero of the week is a whopper Take That-style reincarnation for Boyzone. Ronan Keating told the Sun: “Twenty-five years! But whether by tour, record, book, musical” – ??? Hero of the week is Liam Payne, who has announced that his baby with Cheryl has been born. In investigation news, Harry Styles dropped the first clue to his new music. We haven’t named him yet but he’s already capturing hearts including mine. He wrote on his Instagram page: “My close friends and family know there are very few times when I’m left speechless… – “we haven’t decided yet.” A “source” added: ‘Obviously Keith has been doing his thing in Boyzlife for the past year, which has been brilliant, but now all four of the boys are coming together. I feel very blessed.” Congratulations to all. I’m incredibly happy to welcome our new baby boy into the world, it’s a moment that I will never forget for the rest of my life and my favourite memory I have so far. wow!

Michael Collins and Lost Souls: Blazing a trail

He is a better writer for it. When I wasn’t pounding out the miles, or attending motivational team-meetings – a complete waste of time by the way – I was in class, or back in the dorm reading, and writing, or behind the circulation desk as a student librarian at the Rockefeller Library, what we then called “the Rock”. In some respects, Lawrence is a victim too, albeit he survives, unlike the victim of the crime he is investigating. So begins Lawrence’s quest to discover the truth of what has the traditional set-up of any good thriller. ADVERTISEMENT What’s so exciting about Michael Collins’ writing then is that it is unpredictable. The body is a girl. Here was an Irish author who had been on a running scholarship, and was now living, and writing in the US. It’s pre personal computer, pre forensics, and the digital age – perfect for the lone cop who is trying to find something redemptive in his life, even if he does not consciously know this. I was living in Providence, Rhode Island, and I was on a running scholarship at Brown University. There it was one day waiting for me – the cover containing a vista of Americana stained by a splash of blood. When I first read Michael Collins, I was 20 years of age. Dostoyevsky once wrote that “We have all come out from under Gogol’s ‘Overcoat’”, a reference to the lasting influence of Gogol’s work, and in particular to his seminal story The Overcoat. We are told what is happening at any given moment, but the interiorisation of the character’s conflict is omitted. The procedures of Lawrence’s investigation parallel his own struggle to find meaning, and solace in his life – he’s the underdog, and we want him to do good. It is this omission and, by extension, the admission of the character’s basic ignorance which is so stark and affecting. Kids are out trick or treating when a body is found covered by a pile of autumn leaves and left by the side of the road. Not literary, per se, and not a genre writer, his poetics is a chameleon one. He’s not a complicated guy, and does not always understand why he does one thing or feels a certain way. She’s wearing the costume of an angel. It should be just a good piece of genre fiction: all of …

Want a single entendre? ‘Mrs Brown’ will give you one

It’s easy to scorn broad comedy and very basic shenanigans, like the umpteenth time Mrs Brown gyrates to Shaggy’s Boombastic with doe-eyed visiting Chef Ali, or readjusts her knickers on the delivery of another single entendre. “It is true,” replies Blunt, “I do like wanking.” Careful James, or they’ll make you come again. “The best thing about the new show is that it’s going to include you, the audience,” explains the unsinkable Mrs Brown, as she guides us through the complexities of the new format – a variety show, with guests. But O’Carroll knows his audience. Photograph: Graeme Hunter If Mrs Brown is your idea of fun, the show assumes, then a dishwasher and a year’s supply of tea must be your idea of heaven. Now that Mrs Brown has been granted her own chat show, in the BBC and RTÉ co-production All Round to Mrs Browns (RTÉ One/BBC One, Saturday, 9.15pm), you get to meet them. (She also wins cash, in a flitter of five-euro notes, which – for a show set in Dublin, filmed in Scotland and featuring a mainly English audience – seems almost like a political statement.) When guests Judy Murray and Anderson are largely quizzed about their children, though (Judy, a tennis coach, has created two tennis champions), and Judy’s mother Shirley then arrives to be quizzed about Judy, the show’s whole idea of motherhood – perhaps even humanity – feels like the ribbing sentiment of a greeting card bought last minute at a petrol station. And Blunt, whose syrupy ballads hide a wild streak of humour, makes for an appropriate guest. When Sandra, the winner of Mammy of the Week, is brought onstage, nominated by her daughter for her “potty mouth”, it’s like the introduction of a surreal mirror. The answer here, according to astronomical audience share, can be as much as one in two people. For Agnes Brown, the Irish mammy with a filthy mind, a dirty laugh and a heart of purest treacle, there are no more worlds to conquer. And still, disbelievers despair, who watches this shit? The show is understandably more interested in its watchers than its guests – sitting at Mrs Brown’s kitchen table, Pamela Anderson literally doesn’t know where to look – and Sandra, the Mother of the Week, is later rewarded with a bounty of kitchen-themed prizes. Brendan O’Carroll’s barrelling, cardiganed creation has been a radio star, …

Pop Corner boyband special, featuring Zayn, Harry, Liam and, er, Ronan Keating

It’s such a long time and so much has happened. I’m incredibly happy to welcome our new baby boy into the world, it’s a moment that I will never forget for the rest of my life and my favourite memory I have so far. There’s a bouncy guitar line and syncopated high hats, providing a welcome departure from the all-encompassing tropical house vibe. WHO KNOWS?). Bored of our muso analogies? In investigation news, Harry Styles dropped the first clue to his new music. TRACK OF THE WEEK Zayn feat The Party Next Door – Still Got Time ~Welcome to our boyband special! In a video clip shown on ITV, piano music plays (is this a hint to the sound?) and Harry is soaking wet (is this a scene-setting moment, or a nod to the lyrics?) and he walks to an open door (another clue? But whether by tour, record, book, musical?.?.?.? Ronan Keating told the Sun. It’s going to be a proper moment for pop music.’ ADVERTISEMENT NOW CLICK HERE: To watch Sia tell everyone on Sesame Street about the letter S wow! We’ll ease in by discussing Zain’s new hi-life influenced single. we haven’t decided yet.” A ~ source ~ added: ‘Obviously Keith has been doing his thing in Boyzlife for the past year, which has been brilliant, but now all four of the boys are coming together. “Twenty five years! I’m sure we’ll mark it in some way. He wrote on his instagram page: “My close friends and family know there are very few times when I’m left speechless… We haven’t named him yet but he’s already capturing hearts including mine. All will be revealed apparently on April 7th. Hero of the week is Liam Payne, who has announced that his baby with Cheryl has been born. Yeah I’m boyfriend material’, and remember it for your next night out. I feel very blessed.” Congratulations to all! Zero of the week is a whopper Take That-style reincarnation for Boyzone. “I’m completely in awe of his incredible mother and how she has been the whole way through this, she’s really made my dreams come true. Keep an ear out for the killer line: ‘Do you like my fabric?

‘Writing is not about youth but about spark’

I’ve noticed recently that letters to young writers are becoming fashionable, for example, Colum McCann’s forthcoming book. When you want. ADVERTISEMENT 4) Don’t worry if you can’t get an agent. In my view, if you write every day you’re a certified graphomaniac, you’re OCD, you’re addicted to the physical act and not the real, spiritual one. If you write well and put your own energies into contacting people, you should be able to generate some success. I just don’t buy the every day claim – so it means you’ll never have a hangover day, never be sick, never go off on an impulsive, hedonistic road-trip? 5) Write when you have something to write about. As I’ve always said, writing is the second most fun thing you can do by yourself. I missed the moment of being a publisher’s dream myself but it’s still possible to do well because literature, contrary to what many believe, is not about youth but about spark. After a few days of writing I am as happy to see people as if I’ve been marooned on a desert island for a month. Contrast this with many contemporary Irish writers, the modern ascetics. Don’t live your life vicariously through your writing. It’s common to read articles where authors say that they write every single day, making the rest of us feel inadequate and guilty. I live alone by design. I wasn’t so much a late starter as a late knuckle-downer. Contrast this with many contemporary Irish writers, the modern ascetics, who do their T’ai-chi and yoga classes in the evening as if writing was something you have to be fit for – all you need for writing is a couple of functioning digits. In my view, if you write every day you’re a certified graphomaniac, you’re OCD, you’re addicted to the physical act and not the real, spiritual one Rosemary Jenkinson: I wasn’t so much a late starter as a late knuckle-downer 3) Cultivate your own mythology. 6) Try to make sure your surroundings are conducive to your work. Theatre and publishing worship either precocious young writers or mute dead ones. Self-imposition destroys creativity. A lot of writers come up with the old cliche of having known they were destined for greatness at the age of seven when they wrote a superb existential work about a flying tortoise or the like. Some writers love to boast that …

In defence of hedonism

This is a great shame for pigs, etc. Ben Bramble: “I am defending hedonism mainly just because I think it is true. What prompted you to mount a defence of it? I think it is the latter. Unthinkable: What lies behind your self-esteem? “Hedonism, as I’ve said, is just a theory of well-being. Meat tastes good, yes. Importantly, it does not say we should live so as to maximise our own self-interest-that (false) theory is called egoism. But this much-maligned philosophy has its roots in ancient Greece and has been defended famously by Enlightenment thinkers such as Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. Mustn’t she say that the best life is simply the one with the most pleasure? However, traditional objections to the philosophy are ill-founded, argues Trinity College Dublin lecturer Ben Bramble. “I think we should combine hedonism with utilitarianism, the theory on which we should live so as to maximise the well-being of all sentient creatures, including non-human animals. Combining these views, we get the appealing conclusion that we should live so as to help all creatures feel good and avoid feeling bad. A pleasurable life would be good for us whether we wanted it or not.” Hedonism does not have many public advocates these days. Pleasure is good for us, not because we want it, but just because of how it feels. Or do you want it because you are in some sense responding to the fact that it is good for you? Like other philosophers, I am interested in getting at truth for its own sake. But this benefit to us is infinitesimal when compared to the incredible suffering we inflict on animals to get it. Do you agree? “Mill argued that hedonism does not entail this. Future generations, I suspect, will look back at us with profound dismay.” ASK A SAGE: Question: Why is so much public debate unmannerly? It is that purely repeated pleasures – pleasures that bring nothing new to our lives in terms of their quality – are, in and of themselves, a waste of time. “Simply put, hedonism says that your well-being is fully determined by your pleasures and pains; any two people identical in their pleasures and pains would be identical in their levels of well-being. This means that they can have lives that can go better or worse for them. “For this reason, pigs and most other non-human animals, …

Michael Henry Heim: a gift for translation

But he wanted to remain anonymous, so he approached the PEN American Center about setting up a translation fund. He was deeply concerned by the lack of literature in translation in the USA and determined to do something about it. Their dream was to support future generations of translators and stimulate the publication of more literature from around the world. The PEN Translation Fund was established in 2003 through an anonymous donation. Only after his death in 2012 was it revealed that the gift of $734,000 came from Michael Henry Heim. He was a Hungarian composer and baker who had emigrated to America in 1939 and joined the US army during the second World War. Applications for PEN/Heim Translation Fund grants are not restricted to translators based in the US or from the US. The translator does not need to have a contract with an English-language publisher in order to submit an extract from a translation project. 2017 PEN Literary Awards Ceremony 2016 PEN/Heim Translation Award recipients Rachel McNicholl profile 2017 PEN/Heim Translation Award recipients Background on Michael Henry Heim A sample translation is available on the PEN website: https://pen.org/operation-hinterland-tales-from-the-silver-scrapheap/ Anyone who would like to read more can contact me via the Irish Times or pen.org. I am lucky enough to have received one such grant, and I decided to blow a portion of it on travelling to New York for the awards ceremony today. A translation fund set up in 2003 by the son of a Hungarian immigrant to the USA has helped many books make the transition from their original language into English. Heim was a distinguished translator– of Milan Kundera and Anton Chekhov, among others– and a professor of Slavic languages at UCLA. You might wonder – as I did – how a translator, even a well-known one with a secure job at a university, could amass $734,000 and be in a position to give it away, no strings attached. The death benefit was carefully invested; later, Michael Henry (Mike) and his wife, Priscilla, added slowly to the fund. Recipients of grants from this fund are being honoured at the annual PEN America literary awards ceremony. The work in progress for which I received a 2016 PEN/Heim Translation Fund grant is Der Zwerg reinigt den Kittel (working title “Operation Hinterland: Tales from the Silver Scrapheap”) by Austrian writer Anita Augustin, published by Ullstein Verlag (Berlin). However, 2017 …

Laoch Seapánach an bhealaigh mhóir

Agus mé 16 bliain d’aois chuir mé dúil mo chroí sa Honda 50 Cub. Chosain Honda Cub nua 89 punt ach bhí cinn athláimhe ar fáil níos saoire ar 50 punt. Ba mhinic a thug a athair an gluaisrothar dó chun teachtaireachtaí a dhéanamh dó. Shroich mé baile le dua tar éis teacht slán as trácht an tráthnóna agus ba ghearr gur fhoghlaim mé na scileanna marcaíochta. Ba bhreá liom taisteal leis mar chúlóg agus chuir mé an-suim go deo sa phróiseas a bhain le bíogadh an innill: an gléas breosla a oscailt, an spreagthóir a bhrú agus ansin an dúisire a chiceáil. Ón lá sin amach ní raibh fúm ná tharam ach mo Chub féin a bheith agam. Bhí sé sásta é sin a dhéanamh agus ghluais mé suas síos an bóthar ag dul trí na giaranna gan ródhua mar go raibh crág uathoibríoch ar an ngluaisrothar. Stán mé air faoi dhraíocht sular chuir mé orm clogad m’athar agus bhíog mé an t-inneall. Bhí ár n-aire anois ar chailíní scoile sna rincí, ar cheol na mBeatles, na Stones agus ar fhrithchultúr an aosa óig. Agus muid sa chúigiú bliain sa mheánscoil ag an am sin, bhí mé féin agus mo chara Breandán ag éirí tinn tuirseach den staidéar agus go háirithe den diansmacht. Thuig mé go raibh an-suim go deo ag m’athair sa gluaisrothar nua Seapánacha agus gurbh shin é an fáth gur ghéill sé do m’aisce. Leathchéad bliain ina dhiaidh níl dada dá aiféala orm. Nuair a bhí mé ocht mbliana d’aois d’aistrigh m’athair an Bantam ar ghluaisrothar breá nua, Villiers Ambassador 200cc. Bhí cara liom a raibh Honda Cub ag a athair. Thaispeáin fear an tsiopa an Honda Cub dom. BSA Bantam 125cc a bhí ann. Seachtain ina dhiaidh sin cheannaigh mo chara scoile, Breandán, a Honda 50 nua féin agus, ón lá sin amach, tháinig athrú as cuimse ar ár saol. Ba bheag teorainn a bhí lenár saol óg ó bhi na Cubs fúinn; bhí an saol mór dár nglaoch agus ghéilleamar dó amach is amach agus muid de dhroim ár Honda Cubs. Faoi lár na 1960í bhí ré na ngluaisrothar Sasanach beagnach thart. Bhí cuma chaite sheanaoiseach ar Ambassador m’athar anois, cé go raibh caoi air fós. ADVERTISEMENT Ní raibh airgead ar bith agam seachas airgead póca a thug m’athair dom ag an deireadh seachtaine ach bhí obair pháirtaimseartha le fáil sna tithe tábhairne áitiúla …

Cad é a rinne an tAontas Eorpach dúinn riamh?

Má tharlaíonn choíche go mbeidh orainn luí síos leis na striapaigh allúracha a bhfuil a n-aghaidh soir agus ó dheas acu mar a bhí ag a sinsir san 19ú haois, beidh gach dar sheasamar riamh dó mar phoblacht neamhspleách dingthe sa chiseán bruscair. Is fíor nár ghabh an Phrúis agus an Fhrainc ag pleancadh a chéile ar pháirc an áir ó shin, ach is é is dóichíde gur saoirse na tuirse a bhí anseo, saoirse den tsaghas a leathnaigh ar fud na hilchríche tar éis don Impire Bónaparte a chuid mísce a dhéanamh. ADVERTISEMENT Ach an chaoi a bheith ar fáil, agus all the fine young men a bheith ann, bheadh gunnaí Lúnasa 1914 réidh ullamh arís, cé go mbeadh a n-aire dírithe ar fine young men agus cách eile i mbaill i bhfad uainn soir ó dheas. Scéim bhreá Erasmus a thugann deis do mhic léinn na hEorpa an méid nach ndéanfadh siad sa bhaile a dhéanamh abhus, agus a athrach sin timpeall. Ní mór ná gur glac agus ordóg iad NATO agus Tánaistí na dtíortha ar an ilchríoch. Pian sa phrumpa is ea sinne agus cúpla beach eile nach bhfuil toilteanach an pósadh deiridh a dhéanamh. Tá an tAontas Eorpach/An Comhphobal/An Cómhargadh trí scór bliain d’aois. An fiú liosta a dhéanamh de na tíortha sin a raibh airm Eorpacha gníomhach iontu (lasmuigh den Eoraip) le leathchéad bliain anuas? Is í an tsíocháin an chéad bhua a mhaítear. Is róbhaol an nasc neamhscríofa seo idir geafair stiúrtha NATO agus barúin bheaga bhoga na polaitíochta Eorpaí a thuigeann go maith nach cumhacht go cumhacht airm. Bhuel, An Iaráic, an tSiria, Mali, an Cote d’Ivoire, an Afganastáin, Libia, Gabon, Senegal, Poblacht Lár na hAfraice, Congó nó Congó eile, an tSomáil, Angola, An Chéinia…ach tá páipéar gann. Is fíor go raibh gach aon earra sibhialtachta díobh sin thuas againn sular chlasaíomar leis na buachaillí móra, agus leictreacheas chomh maith, agus gluaisteáin, agus daonlathas, agus leithris taobh istigh fiú amháin. Ós rud é, áfach, go raibh an colún seo riamh meáite agus measartha, agus meánach, agus gan a bheith claonta, is gur thug sé cothrom na Féinne do chách agus do chac, bheadh éagórach gan creidiúint éigin a thabhairt don Eoraip álainn mhaorlathach nuashnasta. Níor chuir sin aon stop le hairm sin na hEorpa a gcuid innealra báis a thabhairt ar deoraíocht leo. Gan amhras ar bith, áfach, is mór an feabhas a …

Deiseanna damhsa, ceoil agus scríbhneoireachta

Is idir an Mháirt 18ú agus an Satharn 22ú Aibreán a bheidh an fhéile ar siúl agus tá an coiste in Éirinn ag iarraidh an oiread d’aos dána na tíre a mhealladh agus is féidir. Tá lucht na féile ag súil leis na míle cuairteoir agus iad ag déanamh ceiliúrtha ar chultúr Ceilteach na hÉireann, na Breataine Bige, na hAlban, na Briotáine, Chorn na Breataine agus Oileán Mhanann. Gearrscéal Tá Conradh na Gaeilge i mBéal Átha na Sluaighe, Co. Beidh imeachtaí ann do cheoltóirí, amhránaithe, cumadóirí, damhsóirí, filí agus scéalaithe, chomh maith le léachtaí, coirmeacha ceoil agus comórtais éagsúla. €300 atá ann mar phríomhdhuais mar aon le corn buan. Beidh comórtais fidle, cruite, ceol beirte, córacha agus damhsa idir na tíortha Ceilteacha ar siúl le linn na Féile Idirnáisiúnta Pan-Cheiltí i mbaile Cheatharlach i mbliana. Tá táille iontrála €10 ann agus tuilleadh eolais le fáil ag gearrsceal@eircom.net na Gaillimhe, ag eagrú comórtas gearrscéalaíochta do scríbhneoirí atá os cionn 18 bliain d’aois. Tá foirm iontrála agus tuilleadh eolais le fáil agat ar líne ag www.panceltic.ie. Is í an Aoine 7ú Aibreán an spriocdháta le cur isteach ar na comórtais. Dúirt cathaoirleach choiste na hÉireann, Bríd de Róiste, go raibh sí ag iarraidh cur le líon na n-iontrálacha as Éirinn le go mbeadh an chuid ab fhearr de thallann na tíre le feiceáil ag an ócáid.

How Thomas Kaplan is using art as a weapon of war

“Our sense of mission is to use Old Masters to promote humanism and its noble offspring: tolerance and mutual respect,” Kaplan said at the launch of Masterpieces from the Leiden Collection, which is at the Louvre until May 22nd. He’s trying to convey a certain rakishness.” “This is the one that started it all,” Kaplan says before Jan Lievens’s Boy in a Cape and Turban; Portrait of the Prince Rupert of the Palatinate, the signature painting for the Louvre exhibition. Though they were known in the art world, the Kaplans preserved their anonymity by naming their paintings the Leiden Collection, in homage to Rembrandt’s birthplace. “He touched her heart. He will loan three paintings to that exhibition. “We are using the most powerful tools we have, Rembrandt and our passion, to build upon the connections that bind people together,” Kaplan said. “I couldn’t believe that we had acquired a Rembrandt. “It was a very powerful message: ‘I’m still here. I’m in the room.’” Kaplan pauses with something approaching paternal pride before Self Portrait in Shadow, painted in 1634, the year of Rembrandt’s marriage. When the gavel came down, I let out such a whoop of joy that [the man who bid on Kaplan’s behalf] winced and pulled the phone away from his head.” Rembrandt’s marriage Kaplan experienced similar exhilaration when he acquired the Rembrandt discovered in New Jersey. Kaplan was on a British Airways flight leaving London when he learned that The Unconscious Patient was signed. “He’s definitely up and coming,” Kaplan comments. Kaplan says he fell in love with Rembrandt at the age of six, on a visit to New York’s Metropolitan Museum with his mother. “I get great joy out of lending,” he says. By putting their entire collection online at theleidencollection.com in February, the Kaplans lost whatever anonymity remained. One of Rembrandt’s earliest works, it had surfaced in New Jersey after being lost for 400 years. He and Daphne (“my soul-mate”) purchased a painting a week for five years, accruing some 250 works of art. The couple hang only contemporary works by Daphne’s mother, the Israeli painter Mira Recanati, in their home. He already owned two of the “senses” paintings, illustrating touch and hearing. You need to get over it and start giving back.” ADVERTISEMENT They had never before seen their treasures displayed as an ensemble. The boyish 54-year-old still associates the scent of hot dogs roasting …