Dancing with the Stars: Dayl Cronin eleminated in shock result

#DWTSIrl— Des Cahill (@sportsdes) March 19, 2017 Can't believe who's in the Dance Off. A bit of a joke? Yet again public vote do not vote for the best dancer. #Aidain in the final over the other three is a joke. @DWTSIRL #DWTSIrl— Linda O'Connell (@thebigloc) March 19, 2017 The stunning spins and lifts of the contemporary ballroom routine of Nothing Compares 2 U must have had many at home wondering if they could give it a go on the floor of Coppers at 3am. But the boy kept swinging and recovered well ,sliding around the dancefloor like he was part made of Mr Sheen. Denise McCormack: hit the high marks with scores of 28 and 27 from the judges. Even though he managed to rack up impressive scores for the night, Cronin was for the chop. Sharp-footed and self assured, she looked like she was enjoying it far too much for it to be a competition, there was no semi-final nerves to be seen. Coming off his triumphant boy-to-man paso doble last week where he really surPASOED himself (arf!) you could see the nerves and apprehension come through as he took to the floor to rumba to Westlife’s What About Now, as presenter Nicky Byrne watched on silently crying (possibly). McCormack’s dramatic almost balletic performance to Hozier’s Take Me to Church was a sensational show-opener, especially so as she was suffering from an injury which made her limber movements all the more remarkable. So hot was it that judge Julian quipped it almost put him back in hospital. They both dazzled. One thing is for sure, it’s going be a nail biting finale next week but will the girls be able to hold off the King of Kerry to snatch the crown or has Aidan O’Mahony waltzed away with it already? Her cheeky Charleston to Basement Jaxx Do Your Thang saw her and Vitali zipping around the floor like Duracell bunnies, a pretzel of their limbs; she was a girl on fire ready to take her place in the final. It was 10s from all the judges with Brian Redmond even going so far as to say she was putting them out of a job as they had nothing to critique. It was all going so well until his return to the dancefloor for the quickstep, or it should it be re-christened the quick slip, as he took an …

Influential rock’n’roll pioneer Chuck Berry dies at 90

Whatever one thinks about the man’s Shakespearean tendencies (and, indeed, the less than savoury aspects of his personal life) there’s no doubting that Chuck Berry, whose death, at the age of 90, was announced on Saturday night by the St Charles County Police department, was fundamental to the development of the music form. He was also instrumental in breaking down racial barriers in the US, with music that made it possible for blues and R&B to be played on “white” radio stations across the country. The rest, as they say, is a mixture of history and hearsay. His appearances included ABC Cinema, Belfast (1977); the Ballisodare Festival, Co Sligo (August 1981); the Grill Music Venue, Letterkenny, Co Donegal (March 2008); and – as far as we can ascertain, his final appearance in Ireland – the Academy, Dublin (July 2008). Rory Gallagher had cited Berry as being one of his primary musical heroes as he made the transition from playing in showbands to writing original material in the lead-up to forming Taste (indeed, in his solo years, Gallagher often performed Berry’s classic rock’n’roll song Nadine). Gallagher was once quoted as saying of Berry: “He’s the greatest, what can I say?” You can join the dots from there to here – listening to Rory Gallagher was The Boomtown Rats’ Bob Geldof and U2’s The Edge. A songwriting innovator who emphasised storytelling over doggerel? It is always a sad occasion when a bona fide pioneer passes away, especially one who was once described by Bob Dylan – no mean songwriter himself – as the “Shakespeare of rock’n’roll”. Inevitably, tributes have poured in from across the world, with many internationally famous rock and pop musicians extolling the virtues of the man who effectively paved the way for their success. Hail, hail rock’n’roll? For many subsequent musicians, Berry was a visionary who formulated a new genre, and his influence on rock’n’roll and the notion of guitar-hero worship remains incalculable. And so it goes on. Another light goes out – that sky is getting darker and darker as the years pass. Rory Gallagher Indeed, Berry’s influence on Irish musicians cannot be ignored. Even an Irish band as youthful as The Strypes can lay claim to being heavily influenced by Berry (“one of the most innovative musicians of all time”, the Cavan band tweeted at the weekend). ADVERTISEMENT Certainly, Berry was no stranger to Ireland.

Chuck Berry: Tributes paid to ‘rock’s greatest practitioner’

RIP Chuck Berry. Without him Rock n Roll wouldn't be what it came to be. https://t.co/H44LMiaR8f— Nikki Sixx (@NikkiSixx) March 18, 2017 “Chuck Berry was rock’s greatest practitioner, guitarist, and the greatest pure rock ‘n’ roll writer who ever lived,” he wrote. He was one of the best and my inspiration, a true character indeed. I want to thank him for all the inspirational music he gave to us. Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger wrote: “I am so sad to hear of Chuck Berry’s passing. His lyrics shone above others & threw a strange light on the American dream. Drummer-producer Questlove posted an image on Instagram: “Thou Shall Have No Other Rock Gods Before Him #ChuckBerry rip @ Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.” Rock’n’roll guitarist Chuck Berry dies aged 90 Chuck Berry obituary: Rock’n’roll’s first guitar hero Chuck Berry 1926-2016 – a life in pictures Berry’s hits were covered by the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, the Beach Boys and many more, and members of all those bands posted messages on Twitter expressing their sadness. Chuck you were amazing & your music is engraved inside us forever.” Ronnie Wood, the Stones’ guitarist, said: “With the passing of Chuck Berry comes the end of an era. He lit up our teenage years, and blew life into our dreams of being musicians and performers. Bruce Springsteen spoke of Berry’s unparalleled abilities as a songwriter. “One of my big lights has gone out!” said Keith Richards. Figures from all walks of life have paid tribute to rock ‘n’ roll pioneer Chuck Berry after the announcement that he had died at a home in Missouri. This is a tremendous loss of a giant for the ages.-Bruce Springsteen— Bruce Springsteen (@springsteen) March 18, 2017 And the Jacksons also paid tribute: “Chuck Berry merged blues & swing into the phenomenon of early rock ‘n’ roll. Goode forever.” The Guardian “This breaks my heart, but 90 years old ain’t bad for rock and roll. You can hear his influence in every rock ‘n’ roll band from my generation on.” The Kinks’ Dave Davies said the guitarist’s death marked the “day music died”. GO JOHNNY GO.” Author Stephen King was among the first to react. “Chuck Berry died,” he wrote. Ringo Starr quoted Berry’s song Rock and Roll Music, which the Beatles covered on their album Beatles For Sale: “Just let me hear some of that rock ‘n’ …

The week’s best TV: The Lovers and the Despot, Nigel Farage, Brendan O’Connor and more

Henry McIlhenny: Master of Glenveagh Thursday, RTE One, 10.15pm For more than 30 years, people have enjoyed the stunning beauty of Glenveagh estate in Donegal, Ireland’s second-largest national park. This documentary follows the women’s 40-year battle against the German company, Schering, who manufactured the drug, and brings new scientific evidence to light. O’Connor’s show trounced TV3’s Pat Kenny Tonight in the ratings war last autumn, and the two giants of telly chat go into battle once again for the coveted Wednesday night current affairs audience. It was thanks to the generosity of a man from Philadelphia, who gave the estate to the Irish government in 1984. So why wasn’t this scandal as well-publicised as Thalidomide? Brendan O’Connor’s Cutting Edge Wednesday, RTE One, 9.35pm Bad news for Pat Kenny: his rival at Montrose is back in the hotseat. Three words: know your enemy. With Ben in jail, and Alice’s company facing ruin, she needs to come up with a plan – quickly. The Catch Tuesday, Sky Living, 10pm It’s been described as a “rom-con”, and it looks like viewers have fallen hook, line and sinker for The Catch , Shonda Rimes’s drama series set in the world of the con-artist. Meanwhile, the Welsh will be eager not to lose further ground on the Irish, having previously won one and drawn three, leaving them four points behind. This documentary tells the story of the wealthy heir who returned to the land of his forefathers and spent many summers at Glenveagh before bestowing it on the Irish people. Shades of Blue Monday, Sky Living, 10pm J-Lo is back on the block as corrupt cop-turned-informer Harlee Santos. We’ve seen TV cops covering up their drink problem or marital difficulties, but Harlee has to hide the fact that she murdered her abusive ex-boyfriend. O’connor’s guests tonight are Fidelma Healy Eames and Eithne Shortall. This documentary, narrated by Bibi Baskin, looks at the story of the McIlhenney family and the history of the Glenveagh estate, which boasts some of Ireland’s most spectacular landscapes and gardens. But many women who took the drug miscarried or gave birth to babies with severe deformities. North Korean Kidnap – The Lovers and the Despot: Storyville MondayBBC4, 10pm Ross Adam and Robert Cannan’s remarkable documentary tells the compelling true-life tale of a South Korean moviemaking couple, director Shin Sang-ok and his actress wife Choi Eun-hee, who were kidnapped in 1978 by …

Nialler9’s New Irish Music: Loah, Conor Walsh, Super Silly and more

It’s on Bandcamp here. VIDEO OF THE WEEK Video Blue – Bombshell  Video by Dara Carroll Music is a group activity an that’s something that Dara Carroll’s video for Jim O’Donoghue Martin’s music project recognises in the new clip for this Video Blue single, which features a bunch of mates playing music and hanging out in a house. Milky – Inside I’m Dancing Dublin singer-songwriter Graham Mitchell has introduced himself with this pleasing orchestral-infused singer-songwriter pop song. The 19-year-old Downpatrick singer Catherine McGrath looks set to capitalise on this momentum with the country pop with 21st century production of Starting From Now. Fidlde, accordion, harp, ukulele, piano and banjo are all utilised and the result is fine album of trad-folk harmony. ADVERTISEMENT ALBUM OF THE WEEK The Henry Girls – Far Beyond The Stars The sixth album from the Donegal sisters Karen, Lorna and Joleen continues the trio’s explorations into combining a capella three-part harmonies, Americana, folk, trad and roots music. Conor Walsh – Fanthesia A year to the week that the Mayo composer and pianist passed away suddenly, the family of Conor Walsh and the label that released his debut EP, Ensemble Music, have shared news that his debut album will get a posthumous release. To mark the one-year anniversary, they shared one of those songs, Fanthesia, a piano instrumental that typified the dynamic emotion that Walsh was capable of working with such minimalism. SONGS OF THE WEEK Super Silly – Not Ready To Leave Ireland’s R&B and hip-hop scene continues to bring the heat and Super Silly are one of those bands responsible for the fire. It’s from a forthcoming EP on Ensemble Music called This Heart, due April 28th. There have already been plenty of signs in recent years, with the popularity of Nathan Carter, Taylor Swift’s origins new stars like Maren Morris and in increasing embrace of its style. <a data-cke-saved-href=”http://conorwalsh.bandcamp.com/track/fanthesia” href=”http://conorwalsh.bandcamp.com/track/fanthesia”>Fanthesia by Conor Walsh</a> Bad Sea – Over My Head Ciara Thompson and Alan Farrell’s Bad Sea band continues to mine retro pop with this sweet piano balladeering track, the stands out for its relevant starkness and its Lana-style melody lines. New single Not Ready To Leave is a suave and sophisticated modern R&B, soul and pop track that has been gaining airplay on Irish radio, and rightly so. This feels like the start of a trend. Every sale on Bandcamp will go towards the …

Donal Dineen’s Sunken Treasure: Sonny Boy Williamson – Down and Out Blues

Suspicious man He was variously referred to as a moody, bitter and suspicious man, and his songs were full of mostly autobiographical lyrics that pulled no punches and were full of dark, mordant wit. From these sparks a great fire was lit. He was a showman. He spent a lot of time making the instrument work for him. Purely as a performer, he had few peers. As well as having a voice that was sly, dark and world-weary – all qualities eminently suited to enunciating the twisted words of his hard blues style – he could also play the harmonica better than anyone else. If there was a pattern it would generally be short, rhythmic bursts intertwined with long periods of impassioned blowing. The new Sonny Boy broke out through the medium of the biscuit. He made no bones about hiding his hard liquor habit, so that languid roll of his would occasionally incorporate the odd shake and stumble, but he was never one for falling down. He had a very distinctive style as a result. If you happened to cross Sonny Boy, there’s a fair chance he’d get you back real good in some future verse. The early days of advertising were a little less fearful of litigation, it seems, and the ruse worked. Sonny played it loud hard and proud. The producers began billing him as Sonny Boy Williamson as a way of catching some deflected starlight from another blues player known as Sonny Boy Williamson, who was far bigger news at the time. He had bided his time honing his craft in the juke joints of Mississippi, and when an opportunity to record came in the 1950s he grasped it with both of his giant hands. Juke joints Sonny Boy was ready for some success when it came his way soon after. Depending on the circumstance or his mood, he could take his game up in an instant and insert the harp into the mouth and move with the tune without using his hands. Some live footage from this period exists and his face is always a study of intensity and intent. In 1941 he was hired the play the King Biscuit Time radio show, sponsored by the King Biscuit brand of baking flour, on KFFA in Helena, Arkansas. A great deal of mystery surrounds his name. ADVERTISEMENT This was a mightily commanding sound all by itself. …

Irish writer Sally Rooney shortlisted for £30,000 story prize

At £30,000 for the winner, this is the world’s richest and most prestigious prize for an English-language single short story. Mr Salary – a short story by Sally Rooney Young Irish author Sally Rooney, whose debut novel Conversations with Friends will be published by Faber in June, has made the shortlist for the £30,000 Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award, along with four American writers and one British author. Previous winners include Chinese American writer Yiyun Li (2015), three Pulitzer prizewinners – US author Adam Johnson (2014), US-Dominican author Junot Diaz (2013) and US author Anthony Doerr (2011), Kevin Barry from Ireland (2012), and CK Stead from New Zealand (2010). Also shortlisted US writer Kathleen Alcott, author of The Dangers of Proximal Alphabets and Infinite Home; Bret Anthony Johnston, director of creative writing at Harvard University and author of the bestselling novel Remember Me Like This; the sole British writer and poet Richard Lambert; Victor Lodato, winner of the PEN USA Award for his novel Mathilda Savitch; Celeste Ng, author of the New York Times bestseller Everything I Never Told You, and whose second novel Little Fires Everywhere will be published by Little Brown later this year. Click to read shortlisted short story This year’s judges are Booker Prize-winning author Anne Enright; broadcaster and author Mark Lawson; Booker-shorltisted author Neel Mukherjee; Orange and Whitbread prize-winning author Rose Tremain; and Andrew Holgate, literary editor of The Sunday Times. The winner will be announced at Stationers’ Hall in London on April 27th. Readers can read the shortlisted entries, one a day from March 20th, at the prize’s website shortstoryaward.co.uk. ADVERTISEMENT Three other Irish writers were longlisted: Lisa McInerney, Christine Dwyer Hickey and Ethel Rohan. The five runners-up will each receive £1,000. Mukherjee said: “A set of stories, first read blind by the judges, that does everything the best of the form is capable of and more: in their ways with meaning, their emotional charge, their power to move, their seemingly effortless negotiation of the punishing nature of the form, their navigation of time, all of them are little gems.” Fiona Shaw and Simon Callow will read the stories at Foyles, Charing Cross Road, London on April 26th. Mr Salary by Sally Rooney

Mr Salary – a short story by Sally Rooney

Nathan said. Nobody else would grieve. You don’t have like a secret tattoo or anything? Lights reflected garishly on the linoleum and people chatted and smiled, as if standing in the lobby of a theatre or university rather than a building for the sick and dying. Sukie, is it? Frank had been moved to the hospital in Dublin for inpatient treatment after contracting a secondary infection during chemotherapy. Nathan’s older sister was married to an uncle of mine, that’s how I ended up moving in with him. We fell silent; even the man on the phone fell silent. Why not? I’ll walk home. Oh, you know what kind of person you are. She had fastened on to this phrase, probably because it so lacked any sinister connotation. Then I turned my face back to stare at the windshield. You’re drowned, he said. I was crying a little. I was still living with him then, finishing my undergraduate degree. That made Nathan laugh. Cuter than me? Two years before, when I was twenty-two, we went to a family New Year’s party together and came home very drunk in a taxi. I smoothed down my hair into an acceptable shape. I thought he wasn’t going to answer that, and then from nowhere he said: News. The next morning after my shower I stood letting my hair drip onto the bath mat, checking visiting hours on my phone. I buttoned up my coat and wore a large fur hat so as to appear mysterious through shop windows. They laughed, but at what? He looked over at me again after he rolled it up. I followed the signs upstairs and asked the nurses where Frank Doherty’s room was. It’s not a good idea. With me it’s just you. It was cold, it stung. He didn’t answer the question. No, now is too early, he said. He looked at me, with his hands on the steering wheel in exactly the correct position, as if I was his driving examiner. I sat down. He couldn’t get purchase on me. He never would have told me himself. Yeah yeah, I have a girlfriend now. There was a small TV set fixed high up on the wall. Did I do something? ADVERTISEMENT You don’t have any news you’ve been waiting to tell me in person, do you? I felt some guilt about that now. No. We never kissed …

Unthinkable: How do we distinguish good businesses from evil?

You mention a move to “co-ordinated market economies”, but how would that work? Absolutely not. Self-restraint founded on integrity is the best defence against exploiting market dominance to influence, for example, political opinion. But beyond that there is very little debate, let alone consensus, on what distinguishes a commendable or worthwhile company from a bad one. In fact, it is quite the contrary. In their book, Digging Deeper, they profile a number of businesses which create “real value” rather than pursuing short-term profit. Real value, they say, means satisfying “our deepest human needs through providing meaning and identity and a higher quality of life for owners, employees, customers, partners and the community alike while renewing the health of our planet”. Rather, we argue that focusing on creating real value is more likely to result in lasting, sustainable profitability of a business.” Can companies really provide “meaning”, or is their modus operandi to give the illusion of meaning in order to make money? Its clothing is exported to exclusive stores and boutiques around the world. One thinks of Facebook giving users the impression of friendship and “community” rather than the real thing. Google’s corporate mission statement is “Don’t be evil”, but against what measure can we establish whether it is meeting its promise? Among the exemplars they cite are the 250-year-old German pencil manufacturers Faber-Castell, the Basque Mondragon workers’ co-operative and the Inis Meáin Knitting Company, which in varying degrees try to meet the ideal. Thus, he provides this week’s ‘Unthinkable’ idea: “Caring for our fellows and the places in which we live is as much the business of business as earning a profit.” Does profit-making always involve moral compromise? Bradley, who teaches at the Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School, UCD, says “profitable business firms need prosperous societies if they are to survive and thrive”. “Deep-purpose enterprises act differently than companies driven by narrow self-interest. ASK A SAGE Question: Are economists measuring the right things? “Jobs are meaningful because their work contributes to something greater than commercial self-interest. They act as stewards, wishing above all else to contribute to thriving communities and a flourishing society.” What sort of structural reform is necessary to allow these sorts of companies flourish? “You mention Inis Meáin. Step forward Finbarr Bradley, a lecturer in business and management who has developed, with colleagues Dietmar Sternad and James Kennelly, a model for identifying “deep purpose enterprises”. Customers …