Dorothy Parker, Dante and me

Wit’s End Installation by Christina Reihill at Smock Alley Theatre (Boys Room) will be opened by RHA Director Patrick Murphy on March 13th and run till March 18th, 10am -6pm. “Listen,” she told her friend Fred Shroyer, “ Don’t feel badly when I die, because I’ve been dead for long time.” I remember first reading this quote 20 years ago, on the eve of entering a six-week stay at the Rutland Centre, for drug and alcohol treatment. Admission free The facts of this story provide the opening premise to my work Wit’s End, which resurrects Parker’s well-documented defiance to deliver a response from the grave to Hellman’s insult. When a friend asked her what stopped her, she replied, “I can’t, I don’t know how.” Working with words, images, props and sound to awaken all the senses, Wit’s End remembers the unpredictable brilliance of Parker in an alchemist’s flare of imagination and leads Parker to her best self on a spiritual Everyman journey based on my map guided by Dante. In her fury, Hellman not only declined to claim Ms Parker’s ashes, she refused to pay the storage fee for five years until the cemetery, frustrated, agreed to Hellman’s request that Parker’s remains be turned over to Hellman’s lawyer who placed the ashes in a filing cabinet for the next 15 years. My map offers the American poet a path to face her demons and inhabit the life she failed to live. But her ashes, the stories of which are almost as famous as she was, were never claimed by Hellman, who was furious with Parker for leaving the proceeds of her estate – $20,000 and the much sought after copyright to her work – to Dr Martin Luther King , whom Parker had never met. The epiphany for this work and Parker’s as my subject to platform questions of soul, arrived soon after I stood on the top floor of the Boys School in Smock Alley Theatre. Dorothy Parker insisted that there be no funeral service after her death. At the age of 32, I was on my way to a divorce, losing another job as a journalist, virtually friendless and worst of all, carrying broken dreams of being a writer. The first and obvious name as a subject was Dante Alighieri, whose opening lines of The Divine Comedy inspire all my work: “In the middle of the journey of …

Cillian Murphy: Bright kids ‘eaten up’ by Irish schools

I always thought that it was retrogressive, but now I realise that it is just natural. “Initially, I was the reluctant one when it came to moving back, but I was quite quickly convinced. He notes that it is a common Irish experience “to move away in your 20s to England or America to establish yourself and find your calling, and then come home. “And, hopefully, they will make some good friends.” Murphy’s parents worked in education in Ireland, his mother as a French teacher, his father as a civil servant. In an interview with The Observer, Murphy expresses his own frustrations with the Irish education system: “You get these really bright and creative kids who get eaten up by that system,” he says. Nevertheless, “if they come out from education with some degree of self-confidence and self-awareness, that’s enough,” he says. The 40-year-old Cork actor lived in London for 14 years but moved to Dublin with his family in 2015: his wife, the artist Yvonne McGuinness, and their children Malachy and Aran, now 11 and nine. Irish people are brilliant and you have to go away and come back to realise it.” Actor Cillian Murphy has spoken of his worries for his children in the Irish education system. He and McGuinness have moved back partly so that their children are better acquainted with Ireland: “You want to be with your parents as they get older and you want your children to be aware of their culture,” he says of the move.

‘I was fooling myself with my idealised version of Dublin’

Or Oscar Wilde, or George Bernard Shaw. I’m not as I was before I left. It didn’t do Joyce any harm. I crafted a vision of Dublin in my imagination that skimmed as lightly over the less desirable aspects of the city as any Fáilte Ireland ad, and I cherished it. I felt comfortable with imagining terrible things happening in London; the Evening Standard proved they happened, every day, all over the city. I’ve never pretended to follow in Joyce’s footsteps, as a writer, but in one respect I am his absolute opposite. Dublin is a living city, and like any living entity it contains both good things and bad. These are words I stopped using because English people don’t understand them.) You know what you are getting with a Scandinavian crime novel, largely: a morose but likeable hero, wide landscapes, social issues, violence, coffee, snow… I’m nervous about crossing the road – the casual freewheeling of the Dublin pedestrian through traffic puts the heart across me (a phrase I type tentatively. I want to go back to Dublin and write about it with the perspective I’ve gained from the time I’ve spent away from it. John Connolly, Alex Barclay, Alan Glynn, William Ryan – and me – all find inspiration outside of Ireland. I promised myself that I wouldn’t write about Dublin until I was living there again, until I had absorbed the truth of the place again, until I could see it without the sentimentality of the emigrant clouding my view. It’s the emigrant’s lament, the awareness that you’ve left something behind that can never be replaced. I mind the gap. Tasked with turning this into a positive, the advertising copy purrs: “They used a ferry from Dublin to make good their getaway. Getting out of Ireland freed the writer in them, or so it seems. I am not alone in thinking these books could only be written by Irish writers, though – the Irishness is in how the stories are told, and what they say about life, death, and who we are. Homesickness was immediate and physical and multi-faceted, like grief. These are words I stopped using because English people don’t understand them.). Let The Dead Speak by Jane Casey was published on March 9th by HarperCollins ADVERTISEMENT I could look at London and see past the grandeur, the opulence, the history and the unflappable focus that …

Pop Corner: The moment everyone’s been waiting for – yes, Steps are back

It was very embarrassing. That’s her tonight and tomorrow she starts to rebuild. I blame him.” ADVERTISEMENT NOW CLICK HERE: To watch two incredible live performances by Lorde on Saturday Night Live It’s those little stupid things. What the fu*k, she thinks you like the beach?! We made a fancy story up; people fell for it. You don’t like the beach! And the song is really about those moments kind of immediately after your life changes and about all the silly little things that you gravitate towards. Well, it’s all lies, says James Blunt. He told Shortlist: “Ed was drunk, messing around, and he cut himself. It’s bizarre that people fell for it. And this year we finally did it.” Zero of the week is swordplay. There is a prime dance-break moment! There’s cascading strings! Would Steps attempt a cringe zeitgeist cash-in, adding tropical house beats to Lisa Scott-Lee’s warblings? “It was my first major heartbreak. There’s a bit referencing the dancefloor! Hero of the week is Lorde, who opened up to Zane Lowe about teh story behind new single Green Light. It’s an instant classic, and we didn’t know we’d missed Steps so much until now. And I realised I was like, “How come this thing is coming out so joyous sounding?” And I realised this is that drunk girl at the party dancing around crying about her ex boyfriend who everyone thinks is a mess. Remember that story about Princess Beatrice cutting Ed Sheeran’s face with a sword? This track is so camp and wonderful. At a SXSW panel last weekend, the team confirmed it: “For years, we tried to get Ed Sheeran on the show to surprise Maisie (Arya). I say, “She thinks you love the beach, you’re such a liar”. Apart from the actual scar. It sounds so happy and then the lyrics are so intense obviously. Fear not. And that’s the song for me.” Meanwhile, Ed Sheeran is going to be on Game of Thrones at last. TRACK OF THE WEEK Steps – Scared of the Dark Admit it, you were holding your breath.

Desmond Fennell: ‘We have not yet achieved national normality’

Of course, beyond these particular reasons for writing the book – a work which took three years from start to finish – there has been the pleasure of being able to narrate and explain one’s life publicly in one’s own terms as one sees it and has experienced it. Gura fada beo mé le Mel, mo chlann agus mo cháirde! which argued for the removal of much public decision-making power from Dublin to regional and district councils. I think that readers will realise that I end up smiling at my life and at all who have participated in it. Not that there has been any serious alternative version to refute or combat; but in the course of my long life I have been involved in mild controversies where the position I was taking may not have been adequately clear. Because that decentralising scheme was rejected by the Dublin government ie the civil service, the midlands, west and northwest of the Republic, in particular their towns and villages, are now in unstoppable decline That settled, several other reasons piled in. In the first part – the book has three parts – I wanted to preserve two accounts I had written which I thought could be useful to future historians. For example, my falling in love with Germany in the first three months of my stay in Bonn where I had gone to write my MA thesis at its university; later, how I learned. In the first place I decided on reflection that my life makes a good story. There were some precious emotional or spiritual experiences that I wanted to share with others. As to Ireland, the year of writing being 2016, I wanted to make clear two things: my firm allegiance to the aim of the Irish Revolution to normalise the Irish nation – by making it politically sovereign, intellectually and culturally self-determining and economically self-sustaining – that, and my regret that we have not yet achieved this national normality. The other preserved account, requested by a German magazine in the 1960s, was of Irish Catholicism when it was still a power in the world, supplying other English-speaking countries with 200 priests a year and sending men and women missionaries to the colonised countries of Africa and Asia to join the thousands of Irish missionaries already at work there, many of whom had taken part in the War of Independence. …

Best new kids’ books: the Children’s Books Ireland list

Accompanied by a CD and beautifully illustrated by a team of accomplished illustrators, this multimedia collection offers a special aesthetic experience. Historopedia by Fatti Burke and John Burke Gill Books, Age 8+ Time travellers of all ages will be engrossed and delighted by this absorbing chronicle of Ireland’s history and mythic past across the eras to the present day. Is eagrán maisithe é seo de na hamhráin agus tá léaráidí áille sa chnuasach seo a thugann eispéireas céadfach dúinn. Reading groups nationwide are invited to sign up for the shadowing scheme via www.childrensbooksireland.ie. Is scéalta iad seo atá oiriúnach don léitheoireacht neamhspleách nó don léitheoireacht os ard. Billy Button, Telegram Boy by Sally Nicholls, illustrated by Sheena Dempsey Barrington Stoke, Age 5-8 Set at a time before mobile phones and email, this enticing historical chapter book chronicles the adventures of Billy Button, a telegram boy who finds himself involved in more than delivering messages when grumpy Mr Grundle receives an unexpected message from an old sweetheart. Kim Hood’s novel sensitively and movingly explores what it is like to struggle with a mental illness, the push and pull of family dynamics, the turbulence of young adulthood, and the difficulties of seeing someone you love suffer. However, her usual songs and favourite jokes don’t work with Edward who’s sad because his dad is sad so Anna Liza devises an unorthodox plan … This empathetic and optimistic first-chapter book has an irresistible appeal. Bliain na nAmhrán scriofa ag Tadhg Mac Dhonnagáin, maisithe ag Jennifer Farley, Brian Fitzgerald, Tarsila Krüse agus Christina O’Donovan Futa Fata, Age 3-7 This sumptuous illustrated collection of songs in Irish invites young and old audiences to celebrate the seasons and the natural world. Chronicling a series of animal yawns, the colour palette gradually darkens as the world of the forest is painted in sunset. They are a celebration of excellence in children’s literature and illustration and are open to books for all ages written in English or Irish by authors and illustrators born or resident in Ireland. Is cnuasach béaloidis é seo de scéalta ón Afraic a bhfuil blas traidisúnta agus blas comhaimseartha le brath iontu. Five other awards will also be made in May – the CBI Book of the Year Award, Honour Awards for Fiction and Illustration, the Eilís Dillon award for a first children’s book and the Judges’ Special Award. Eoin Colfer’s deceptively simple story sensitively …

I believe my father was murdered by Turkish secret police

It unexpectedly became a belated bestseller in Turkey about eight years ago, which lead to its publication in English last year. “You continue to grieve. It has a modern way of looking at relationships between men and women. “There is only me; I was the only child. In those days, there was no counselling for anyone, never mind children, and my mother was too distraught herself to help me. A former concert pianist and prominent musicologist, she has given recitals, was an accompanist and also played in the opera orchestra in Istanbul. It was to change its name a few times. His first novel, Yusuf of Kuyucak, came out in 1937; a second, Devil Inside (or The Devil Within), followed in 1940. “No one wanted a story about a strong woman and a weak man. His body was never found and Filiz Ali is convinced he was murdered by the Turkish secret police. This was not the way people were supposed to be… certainly not the way Turkish men were to conduct themselves,” says Filiz Ali. “My father taught me everything without ever teaching; about nature, about trees, the birds. He looked to the heart, real emotion.” Madonna in a Fur Coat by Sabahattin Ali is published in paperback by Penguin “But it’s not about bestsellers; it is far more about having his words read.” There is no grave to morn at, yet Filiz Ali takes comfort not only from the memory of the man she knew, and of the words he wrote, “his stories,” but that among the few belongings released by the police after his death was a volume of Balzac and a copy of Pushkin’s enduring classic, Eugene Onegin. It was a very dramatic period in the closing years of the Weimar Republic and there he was – learning German and exchanging ideas. The character in the novel Raif is a tentative young man whose shyness exasperates his father, a traditional man. He knew we humans are all different, he understood individuals and for this he paid. “It was amazing when you think of it, here was this young republic, in the backward east, a poor country, yet there was such an emphasis on education.” In common with Raif Efendi, the central character in his novel, Ali on graduating from teacher-training college had been sent to Berlin, where he stayed for about 18 months between 1926 until …

I want to go back to Dublin, to take it for granted again

I’ve absorbed some aspects of English life: I turn up on time for things. There’s a large advertising hoarding somewhere in the depths of Dublin Port, where the passenger ferries depart for Holyhead. “When I Die, Dublin Will Be Written In My Heart” it proclaims, beside a picture of a dyspeptic looking James Joyce, the Poolbeg chimneys looming in the background. These are words I stopped using because English people don’t understand them.) You know what you are getting with a Scandinavian crime novel, largely: a morose but likeable hero, wide landscapes, social issues, violence, coffee, snow… Getting out of Ireland freed the writer in them, or so it seems. Or Samuel Beckett, who fled the country and the English language at the same time. John Connolly, Alex Barclay, Alan Glynn, William Ryan – and me – all find inspiration outside of Ireland. I’m not as I was before I left. I’ve never pretended to follow in Joyce’s footsteps, as a writer, but in one respect I am his absolute opposite. I didn’t settle in well. Despite superficial similarities it felt as unlike Stephen’s Green as it’s possible to be. It’s the emigrant’s lament, the awareness that you’ve left something behind that can never be replaced. When I started to write crime novels, it was London in all its variety and darkness that formed the backdrop for my stories. ADVERTISEMENT Children’s Books Ireland Book of the Year shortlist revealed I believe my father was murdered by Turkish secret police Elegies to death and loneliness And yet, somehow, I knew I was fooling myself with my idealised version of Dublin. I could look at London and see past the grandeur, the opulence, the history and the unflappable focus that defines Londoners. Underneath, in smaller writing, you can read that James and his wife Nora left Ireland in 1904. My first office was near Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London’s largest garden square. Let The Dead Speak by Jane Casey was published on March 9th by HarperCollins ADVERTISEMENT When I started to write crime novels, it was London in all its variety and darkness that formed the backdrop for my stories. I would pause there under the trees on my way to work and try to imagine I was back in Dublin, just for a moment. And I couldn’t bring the same clear-eyed, dispassionate, outsider’s perspective to bear on Dublin when I couldn’t stand …

Children’s Books Ireland Book of the Year shortlist revealed

Óró na Circíní agus Scéalta Eile ón Afraic athinste ag Gabriel Rosenstock, maisithe ag Brian Fitzgerald An Gúm, Age 9-11 This collection of retellings of oral African stories juxtaposes the traditional and the contemporary while honouring the tales’ cultural contexts and is sensitively retold by Gabriel Rosenstock and evocatively illustrated by Brian Fitzpatrick. The relentlessly curious Jack, on a mission to find his missing friend, is recruited into the secret Ministry of Strange and Unusual and Impossible Things (Ministry of S.U.I.T.S) which deals with all the weird creatures and objects in the world. Following the travails of several teenagers, including Nessa (unlikely to survive the ‘Call’ due to being permanently disabled from polio), this intense story does not flinch from exploring the price of survival. Is cnuasach béaloidis é seo de scéalta ón Afraic a bhfuil blas traidisúnta agus blas comhaimseartha le brath iontu. The Ministry of Strange, Unusual and Impossible Things by Paul Gamble Little Island Books, Age 9+ Get ready for a rollercoaster of zaniness, adventure and hilarity! These young readers will choose the winner of the Children’s Choice Award. Plain Jane by Kim Hood O’Brien Press, Age 12+ Jane’s little sister Emma has cancer and for the last three years has occupied all their parents’ attention. Five other awards will also be made in May – the CBI Book of the Year Award, Honour Awards for Fiction and Illustration, the Eilís Dillon award for a first children’s book and the Judges’ Special Award. Goodnight Everyone by Chris Haughton Walker Books, Age 1+ The sun is setting, everyone in the forest is getting sleepy but one little bear is trying to stay awake … Chris Haughton’s vibrant illustrations combine perfectly with deceptively simple narrative in this mesmerising bedtime tale. Athinsíonn Gabriel Rosenstock na scéalta seo go híogair agus maisíonn Brian Fitzpatrick iad go hallabhrach. Historopedia by Fatti Burke and John Burke Gill Books, Age 8+ Time travellers of all ages will be engrossed and delighted by this absorbing chronicle of Ireland’s history and mythic past across the eras to the present day. ADVERTISEMENT Needlework by Deirdre Sullivan Little Island Books, Age 15+ Needlework by Deirdre Sullivan is a poetic and eloquent exploration of violation, abuse and neglect and advocacy of the transformative power of art. It is of particular satisfaction to note that six of the ten books on the shortlist are Irish published, highlighting the quality of …

Ed Sheeran to star in Game of Thrones

– (PA) All 16 songs on Sheeran’s latest album ÷ (Divide) are in the UK Top 20 singles, and all of his three albums are in the Top 5 albums. The star would not be the first musician to make a cameo in the show – Coldplay’s Will Champion and Snow Patrol’s Gary Lightbody have appeared in previous episodes. And Sheeran (26) appeared to confirm the news by posting a link to a news story about his casting on Twitter and writing: “Guess the cat’s out the bag…” Speaking at a panel discussion, Benioff and Weiss said they had been pursuing Sheeran for some time, as Game Of Thrones actress Maisie Williams was a fan. He plays two sold-out concerts in Dublin next month. “For years, we tried to get Ed Sheeran on the show to surprise Maisie, and this year we finally did it,” Benioff said. Further details on Sheeran’s role were not given. guess the cats out the bag… https://t.co/9GCDUp9HPN— Ed Sheeran (@edsheeran) March 12, 2017 The Shape Of You singer will appear in the upcoming seventh series of the fantasy drama. The show’s creators David Benioff and DB Weiss spilled the beans during the South By Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas. Singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran is to guest star in Game Of Thrones.

A writer in exile: Jane Casey’s tale of two cities

Or Oscar Wilde, or George Bernard Shaw. John Connolly, Alex Barclay, Alan Glynn, William Ryan – and me – all find inspiration outside of Ireland. I didn’t settle in well. I am not alone in thinking these books could only be written by Irish writers, though – the Irishness is in how the stories are told, and what they say about life, death, and who we are. There are more of us now writing crime novels than ever before, but one of the distinguishing characteristics of Irish crime is that many of us don’t write about Ireland at all. I’ve never pretended to follow in Joyce’s footsteps, as a writer, but in one respect I am his absolute opposite. I walk with the speed and purpose of a London commuter. I’ve absorbed some aspects of English life: I turn up on time for things. The Leaving Cert English syllabus supplied the words to fit the moment: Gerard Manly Hopkins imploring, “Send my roots rain.” But no rain came. It will take time to learn the rhythm of the city again, to take the wit and colour of Dublin conversation for granted, to take the measure of the place and the people. I felt comfortable with imagining terrible things happening in London; the Evening Standard proved they happened, every day, all over the city. It’s the emigrant’s lament, the awareness that you’ve left something behind that can never be replaced. I’m nervous about crossing the road – the casual freewheeling of the Dublin pedestrian through traffic puts the heart across me (a phrase I type tentatively. Tasked with turning this into a positive, the advertising copy purrs: “They used a ferry from Dublin to make good their getaway. Underneath, in smaller writing, you can read that James and his wife Nora left Ireland in 1904. Homesickness was immediate and physical and multi-faceted, like grief. I can only speak for myself. Let The Dead Speak by Jane Casey was published on March 9th by HarperCollins ADVERTISEMENT I felt comfortable with imagining terrible things happening in London; the Evening Standard proved they happened, every day, all over the city. As an outsider, I was aware of the things people took for granted: the unique rhythm of London life, the strangeness of the place and the way people insulate themselves from the eight million others who share their oxygen, the smells and sounds of …

Dancing with the Stars: Des Cahill’s luck finally runs out

For the last time…from an empty #DWTSirl studio…a massive THANK YOU for your kindness & support! 🌹 pic.twitter.com/Y6bl73ngvq— Des Cahill (@sportsdes) March 12, 2017 Karen – you are an absolute legend! — TERESA MANNION (@TeresaMannion) March 12, 2017 (@KreativDentaIRL) March 12, 2017 — Kreativ Dental Irl. Thank you💔#DWTSIrl pic.twitter.com/DVxL3nf1xQ Des we will miss you it will not be the same without a gentleman like you who gave hope to many others to start dancing. @KarenDWTS @sportsdes #DWTSIrl We’re all shedding a few tears for one of the most popular couples on the show Up against Aoibhín Garrihy in the Dreaded Dance Off (DDO), he simply could not compete. Referred to regularly as a gentleman, he brought us moves like The Dessie Swim (where Byrne rode Cahill like a dolphin across the floor) and wooed us as a matador and a mechanic. Redmond applauds his energy and Barry sets him the challenge to match the passion and rhythm of his bottom half with his top half next week, a tip we should all take with us to the grave. The BB lasts for a grand total of three minutes and the final couple standing can earn an extra five points. During the BB, our couples jive up a storm until the judges ask them to leave the dancefloor, just like the prom scene from Grease. Just as Enda Kenny calls for a referendum to be held on voting rights for Irish abroad in presidential elections, our voters at home – with the combination of the judges’ final say – finally get it right in the quarter finals of RTE’s Dancing with the Stars as Dancing Dessie Cahill is sent home. ADVERTISEMENT But before the BB, it’s business as usual and first out on the dancefloor, dressed like the dancing emoji girl in her red gúna, is Aoibhín Garrihy. “The closer you get to that end date, the more you want it,” she says in rehearsals and her tango to Shakira’s Objection with partner Vitali Kozmin proves that she really, really wants to win. As usual, the votes at home are added to the judges’ scores and the two couples with the lowest combined scores face each other in The DDO, returning the power to the judges instead of those unpredictable voters. On Sunday night, he brought us a new character called Dessie Swayze as he jived to Do You Love Me? …

Sraitheanna nua faisnéise ar TG4 agus an BBC

Dúirt Antaine Ó Donnaile, léiritheoir na sraithe, go raibh siad le plé a dhéanamh “ar cheisteanna reatha a bhfuil brí agus ábharthacht ag baint leo don phobal, is cuma cé acu Gaeilge, Béarla nó teanga ar bith eile atá acu”. Beidh plé agus anailís ann ar roinnt scéalta agus topaicí leathanréimseacha atá tábhachtach don lucht féachana sa Tuaisceart sa lá atá inniu ann. Máire Bhreathnach a chuirfidh an tsraith i láthair agus beidh sise agus a cuid aíonna ag caint ar shláinte meabhrach, an cearrbhachas agus deonú organ. Chuaigh na céadta Éireannach, idir shagairt agus mhná rialta, chun cónaithe sa tír agus iad ag obair i réimsí difriúla. An Misean sa tSín is ainm do shraith nua faisnéise a chraolfar ar TG4 ag 7.30pm anocht. Bhí tuairim is 150 misinéir Éireannach ag obair sa tSín in 1920 agus 250 faoi 1950. Focal scoir Agus tá sraith nua pléchláir, An Focal Scoir, le craoladh ar BBC Two NI anocht ag 10pm. Beidh scannáin agus grianghrafanna nach bhfacthas riamh le feiceáil agus is é cuspóir lucht déanta na sraithe léargas as an nua a thabhairt ar an cheangal céad bliain idir Éirinn agus an tSín. Blianta corracha a bhí sna blianta sin sa tSín. Scrúdaíonn na ceithre chlár 40 bliain d’obair ag na misin Éireannacha sa tSín idir 1920 agus na 1950í. Amharcfaidh na cláir ar thréimhsí éagsúla den obair seachtain ar sheachtain – Tús, Tubaiste, Cogadh agus Díbirt.

‘My father was murdered by the Turkish secret police’

The first was published in Turkey in 1995. She had always been very beautiful, right until the end. “I didn’t believe them.” So much so that she did not tell her mother, who was already anxious about his decision to flee Turkey. She had fenced in the 1936 Olympics, I knew women like that. We have regressed I feel. Since a failed coup attempt in July 2016, President Recep Erdogan has shut down more than 170 media outlets, including a newspaper, magazines, TV stations and news agencies. Maria is opinionated, independent and philosophical. The beguiling narrative, a novel within a novel, a tender, melancholic romance with several twists as well as hints of Turgenev, and a strongly feminist subtext, had received little attention when it first appeared in Turkey in 1943. Little known Sabahattin Ali’s work has been widely translated across Europe and many of his poems have provided the lyrics for pop songs sung daily in Turkey – “and by people who don’t realise they are singing one of his poems”. It has a modern way of looking at relationships between men and women. “But it’s not about bestsellers; it is far more about having his words read.” There is no grave to morn at, yet Filiz Ali takes comfort not only from the memory of the man she knew, and of the words he wrote, “his stories,” but that among the few belongings released by the police after his death was a volume of Balzac and a copy of Pushkin’s enduring classic, Eugene Onegin. “These reporters came and told me he had been killed. The violent “and mysterious” circumstances of Sabahattin Ali’s death has shaped her life. Later that evening the same two reporters arrived at the family apartment in Ankara and told her mother about the murder. It was a very dramatic period in the closing years of the Weimar Republic and there he was – learning German and exchanging ideas. more likely it was the secret police. The Turkish authorities singled him out and twice imprisoned him, in 1933 and again in 1941, before Ali heeded warnings and decided to leave, intending to get to the West. ADVERTISEMENT The truck driver received a brief sentence, only four years, which was further shortened to a year. While in Berlin Raif instead of acquiring business skills, discovers literature and visits art galleries. His first novel, Yusuf of Kuyucak, …

CLG – cumann na sách agus na seang

ADVERTISEMENT Am. Cad é sin mar dhaonlathas? Níl i Rún 4 ach méadú ar líon na gcluichí idirchontae ag na foirne is láidre agus bíodh an diabhal ag an 99.9 faoin gcéad eile d’imreoirí ar fud na tíre. Pobal. B’aisteach mar sin gur chuir údaráis CLG gobán san imreoir club ag comhdháil bhliantúil na bliana seo nuair a baineadh de chlár na comhdhála Rún 41, rún chun aitheantas oifigiúil a thabhairt do chumann na n-imreoirí club (CPA). Ach ní féidir toil, deoin ná leas a chuntas faoi mar is féidir na puint a áireamh agus níl luach ar bith níos tábhachtaí ná sin anois is léir. Gur tábhachtaí agus gur fiúntaí rud a thabhairt uait ná rud a fháil. Na mílte carr timpeall na tíre agus iad lán le páistí – iad ag dúil go mór le comórtas éigin ar pháirc imeartha éigin maidin Domhnaigh. Ní bheadh moill ar dhuine na coincheapa sin a thuiscint dá gcaithfeadh sé súil ar mhuintir Shleacht Néill agus an gliondar a bhí orthu an tseachtain seo caite nuair a thug an fhoireann chamógaíochta craobh shinsir na camógaíochta leo go cróga, calma lúfar. An tÉilíteachas. Cuirfear le sparán CLG agus le líon na gcluichí a chraolfar ar Sky ceart go leor. Mo sheanathair ba chúis leis sin – nó camán a rinne sé lena lámha féin ar mo shonsa ba chiontaí leis ba chirte dom a rá. Mórtas cine. Teaghlach. Luachanna Geansaithe foirne ar an líne i ngairdíní cúil ar fud na tíre lá samhraidh. Grá. Bhí sé ag iarraidh ceacht a theagasc dom. Glacadh leis in ainneoin mhianta na n-imreoirí club agus idirchontae araon. Airgead. Ach dar liom go raibh níos mó ná sin i gceist. Ní raibh ceachtar den CPA ná an GPA ar a shon – ba é an mana a bhí ag an CPA ó tháinig ann dó go raibh sé dubh ina éadan agus ba mar sin do 70 faoin gcéad d’imreoirí an GPA é chomh maith. Is é an t-aon luach ar ar bunaíodh an cinneadh seo, luach airgid. Bhí deis ag údaráis CLG a chur in iúl d’imreoirí club ar fud na tíre go raibh fáilte rompu féin agus an CPA. An Corparáideachas. Cúram. Is é an ceacht is mó atá le foghlaim ó chomhdháil seo CLG nach bhfuil de sheift ag an 99.9 faoin gcéad den chumann ach ár mbealach a dhéanamh go ciúin géilliúil déircínteach siar …

Na scannail seo romhainn

Bhí a fhios againn go maith. Cén fáth go dtagann boladh bréan an éirí in airde mórálta chugam ar an ngaoith? Agus an Soláthar Díreach sin do theifigh ar a gcoimeád ón mbás agus ón ngorta? Is é a chuireann alltacht orainn faoi scannail na mblianta seo faoi láthair na go bhfuil a lánfhios againn – chomh dearfach céanna. Tá na taibhsí aníos á nochtadh anois, idir eagla agus fháilte rompu. Dá mhéid iomrascála a dhéanann tú led intinn, dá mhéid réasúnaíochta a leaisticeálann tú ina thimpeall, éalú ar bith níl ón uafás. Ní hé nach raibh a fhios againn, gan amhras, sin é an dearmad mór. Níl ann ach go bhfuil a mhalairt de leithscéalta againn. Is deacair breith ar na scannail uafáis atá ag gabháil steallaidh orainn ó chianaibh. Ach nach orthu féin atá an locht, nach bhfuil dóthain oibre ann dóibh dá n-éireodh siad aníos as a dtóin, ní sinne a thug na drugaí dóibh, ná cuirtear im cheantarsa iad, íslíonn siad praghas na dtithe, ní féidir cur isteach ar an maoin phríobháideach, is é an margadh an tiarna, ní bheidh aon ní a dhíth orm, cuireann sé féin mé im shuí go te sa seoladh is fearr, ungann sé mo cheann le hairgead, tá mo chupa ag cur thairis. Cad iad na scannail atá ar lic an dorais againn féin anois a mbeifear dár mallachtú dá ndeasca nuair a éireoidh an ghrian orthu? ní sinne a d’iarr orthu teacht anseo, tá an iomad díobh ann ar aon nós, ní ciníochas é seo, ní hionann a gcás agus imircigh óga na hÉireann, níl aon rud agam ina gcoinne ach níor mhaith liom go bpósfadh iníon liom duine díobh, tá francaigh sa chistin againne chomh maith, tá teorainn le páipéar leithris fara gach rud eile, tugtar aire dár mbochta féin ar dtús. Nár cheart go mbeadh siad buíoch go bhfaigheann siad cúpla seiceal in aghaidh na seachtaine?… Ar leith amháin tá uafás na leanaí uchtála, agus ina gcoinne sin thall tá reiligí na naíonán gan bhaisteadh, nó le baisteadh, nach raibh acu ach faiteadh féin na súl ar éigean seal beag gairid acu ar an saol seo. Is í an cheist ná, cad a bheidh i mbinsí fiosraithe na mblianta seo romhainn amach? Eagla, toisc má fuair breis agus 80 faoin gcéad de na leanaí a saolaíodh in áras amháin díobh bás, mar atá tuairiscithe, is deacair cosaint …