Augmenting the music with live visuals: Kevin Freeney of Algorithm

Freeney is a visual artist and creative director with the Dublin-based company Algorithm. It’s a complementary collaboration, with equal weight given to both audio and visual aspects of the project. “If we remove the connection of film and video from projectors, we are seeing all sort of textures, digital animations and materials being projected onto any physical geometry. “I start the creative process with looking at the space or environment that the work will be seen or experienced through,” explains Freeney. Last year, Algorithm did visuals for over 180 musicians, DJs and bands at venues, festivals and installations. Building on the equal weight of music and visuals in the CLU project, each discipline is considered equal. You may be familiar with his and Algorithm’s work if you attended any of the following events or venues recently: Metropolis, Body&Soul, Web Summit, Electric Picnic, District 8, Wah Wah Club or Habitat. So began Freeney’s library of visual clips and techniques, utilised early on at club nights such as Junior Spesh and First Second and developed since. We can now make everything look like anything,” says Freeney. Those techniques allowed Freeney to break free of the constraints of a boxed screen. “What’s interesting to me about music videos as opposed to live visuals is how the videos are perceived years later as a single piece of work. “CLU is about self-exploration when it comes to the concepts. “Projection mapping is like an extended form of augmented reality.” ADVERTISEMENT Clu’s A/V explorations As one half of the A/V duo CLU, Freeney has developed a visual aesthetic for Sean Cooley’s experimental electronic music that that works with a palette of polychromatic neon colours, abstract textures and effects-driven computer-generated imagery. Kevin Freeney’s work in music might be the last thing you think of, but it’s likely the first thing you’ll see at a festival, at a gig or online through a music video or promo. He was offered a licensed copy of the visual program Isadora in exchange for doing visuals at Block T’s launch in Smithfield, an event which was described to him as a “warehouse party”. For more on Grayscale, see eventbrite.ie/e/grayscale Sean is always making sonic oddities and exploring new genres and realms of music. As part of pushing the importance of and respect for visual art forwards, Freeney tells me that Algorithm are now utilising the Vive virtual reality headset so the …

Listen up: the wonderful world of audiobooks

I was looking for a female narrator who could be funny, do some bizarre accents (a Hungarian Gran, a Texan best friend etc) and introduce a sense of drama where needed. So why were they not on my radar before now? There is a bit of pattern when it comes to audiobooks, one that I was not even aware of. Luckily, they weren’t easily fazed.” Self-published author Denise Deegan agrees. The thrillers take the baton and remain the most rented titles, with female fiction and non-fiction chasing their tails. Children can struggle with reading, some more than others, and this is a perfect way to keep them entertained without it seeming a chore. For adults too that struggle with literacy, audiobooks can be great and can bridge that gap between people’s aspirations to read and be connected to the world of books and their abilities.” This brings up a whole other aspect to the audiobook surge. ADVERTISEMENT Looking at the most popular rented audiobooks on borrowbox in Ireland there is not a huge difference to the traditional bestseller lists. It would take four to five days working flat out to read one of my novels (I used to record them in the UK when I was writing as Kate Thompson). When I came to publish my first crime novels it was a happy coincidence that Jan was working for my publisher Bookouture and they decided to have her narrate my Erika Foster series. Robert Bryndza, author of the No 1 international bestseller The Girl in the Ice, has been lucky to work with the same narrator for both his romantic comedy audiobook and his more recent thrillers. That’s why I didn’t record either of my Kate Beaufoy books, and specifically requested Niamh Cusack for Another Heartbeat in the House, because she is so very good. Choosing Sebastian Barry’s Days Without End, I plugged in the earphones, closed my eyes and lay back. ADVERTISEMENT “As a former actress and experienced voiceover artist I found even reading my own books really, really tough. I had a library of audio titles, saved on my phone, and had barely made a dent in the titles. For the reader/listener, it is a case of sitting back, relaxing and letting someone else do all the work for you. The voice becomes part of the enjoyment and sites even add the option of choosing titles by their …

‘Motherhood is a choice’: artists respond to ‘Repeal the Eighth’

The Anatomy of Autonomy is self-explanatory: my body, my choice. On the eve of International Women’s Day, we present a selection of works from the anthology, which is being published in support of the Abortion Rights Campaign. It will be launched at The Workman’s Club, Dublin, on Tuesday, March 7th. Repeal the 8th, by Neidin Rodgers I wanted to include different genders, races and ages in my illustration to show the Eighth Amendment doesn’t just affect women, it affects us all. I wanted this illustration to show how we should unite to repeal the Eighth. That my body is governed by an uncaring government. An anthology of work by artists and illustrators is being published to mark International Women’s Day and to highlight the issue of abortion rights in Ireland. ADVERTISEMENT You’re Pregnant, by Clare Foley I felt that engaging the viewer, encouraging them to put themselves in someone else’s shoes, was key to making a simple point about the accessibility of these health services. I used the format of a ‘flow chart’ and the juxtaposition of the lightness of colour and cartoon-ish figures with the more sombre text would highlight the seriousness of the subject matter and the urgent need to address it. For more information visit www.facebook.com/MineAnthology When You’re so Happy That You’re not Pregnant, by Ciara O’Neill It’s likely that every woman will have at least one pregnancy scare in her life. Stop exporting the issue. I believe that the idea of motherhood being a decision and a choice is very powerful, the “radical” idea that women should have options, control and autonomy over their own bodies. I wish the Irish Government had the courage to progress the matter, but now that we have a Citizens’ Assembly, I would like to see a conversation with everyone who is invested, rather than a hand-picked group of stakeholders. The moment you can say: “I’m not pregnant”. Repeal the Eighth. My Body my Choice, by Julie Rosebud My drawing is a very light and funny one, but for me symbolic of the right to self-determination. The 8th Amendment, by Ciara Kenny I wanted to show the far-reaching implications of the Eighth Amendment, not just for women who need abortions, but for all pregnant women, for healthcare professionals, for men, and many, many others, as well as the consequences of keeping it in place. I hope the graphics help people recognise their …

‘If a woman becomes pregnant her life belongs to the State’: artists respond to ‘Repeal the Eighth’

The pain they must feel, packing their bags, an exile imposed by barbaric and outdated laws. I also find it a funny story that the king was “uncrowned” or found “unfit to rule” for 1 day so this law could be passed. I wish the Irish Government had the courage to progress the matter, but now that we have a Citizens’ Assembly, I would like to see a conversation with everyone who is invested, rather than a hand-picked group of stakeholders. This statement has extra weight added in Ireland: if a woman becomes pregnant her life no longer belongs to her but to the State; she has been denied a choice. Nor has the country descended into debauchery. That my body is governed by an uncaring government. Shackled, by Dearbhla Kelly I had this idea knocking around my head for a while of the ‘8’ as a set of handcuffs shackling a pair of desperate hands, which could represent so many people affected by the Eighth – women forced to travel for abortion, women who don’t have the means to, doctors and midwives whose hands are tied by the constitution. But this is a right that has been fought hard for, for many decades, and also a right that can be taken away by an unfriendly government any time if we’re not careful. I used the format of a ‘flow chart’ and the juxtaposition of the lightness of colour and cartoon-ish figures with the more sombre text would highlight the seriousness of the subject matter and the urgent need to address it. For more information visit www.facebook.com/MineAnthology When You’re so Happy That You’re not Pregnant, by Ciara O’Neill It’s likely that every woman will have at least one pregnancy scare in her life. Citizens’ Assembly to be balloted on abortion recommendations Citizens’ Assembly hears from women affected by Eighth Amendment Citizens’ Assembly chair defends presence of abortion advocates Spare a Thought, by Tanya Cody I often think about what Irish women have to go through to access the medical care they need. ADVERTISEMENT You’re Pregnant, by Clare Foley I felt that engaging the viewer, encouraging them to put themselves in someone else’s shoes, was key to making a simple point about the accessibility of these health services. Bodily Integrity, by Marjolein Moonen She looks like she’s trying to protect herself, I thought when I made this print, which is inspired …

Pop Corner: You’re going to need to give Lorde’s new song three listens

On the third listen, you’ll marvel at the nuance in the lyrics – “I’ll take my things but I can’t let go (that green light, I want it)”. How do you even get there?” He went on: “Our truth and where we come from is so different, I don’t even expect the world to get it.” Zero of the week is Ed Sheeran’s record label, which tried to quash Galway Girl. But there’s 400m people in the world that say they’re Irish, even if they’re not Irish. I hope that this film will show people that there is nothing wrong with having a mental health condition, if you do have one, you are able to live well and thrive with a mental health condition, if you are able to speak up and be vocal about the things you are going through.” Meanwhile, Stormzy told digital radio station LBC not to make fatuous connections between grime and knife crime. TRACK OF THE WEEK Lorde – Green Light You’re going to need to give this three listens. On the first listen, you’ll catch a glimmer of the chorus, but be put off by the song’s structure. Ed told the Guardian: “They were really, really against Galway Girl, because apparently folk music isn’t cool. You meet them in America all the time: ‘I’m a quarter Irish and I’m from Donegal.’ And those type of people are going to fucking love it.” ADVERTISEMENT Hero of the week is Demi Lovato, who continues to be an advocate for better mental health. He explained: “That is such a farfetched statement. On the next, you’ll be totally sucked in, and stick the track on repeat. Does she want the green light to leave, or to fold back into her lover’s arms again? For someone to say that grime music is the reason for the country”s knife-crime epidemic – that is wild! In a press conference for her new documentary Beyond Silence she explained to Variety: “”It’s important that we get that message out there because mental health is so important – it’s just important as physical health.

‘My body is governed by an uncaring government’ – artists respond to #repealthe8th

My work captures that moment of relief that follows the arrival of one’s period. Repeal the 8th, by Con O’Brien When I was asked to paint a mural I wanted it to be striking, to grab attention so I used a large empty background, for the main section of the mural I wanted to keep very simple and easy to read as to me that was the main focus. Nor has the country descended into debauchery. You’re Pregnant, by Clare Foley I felt that engaging the viewer, encouraging them to put themselves in someone else’s shoes, was key to making a simple point about the accessibility of these health services. The moment you can say: “I’m not pregnant”. I wanted this illustration to show how we should unite to repeal the Eighth. I chose to to subvert their message – to show Ireland as it is, an island that discriminates against all women, where women are exported like any other goods, package or problem. On the eve of International Women’s Day, we present a selection of works from the anthology, which is being published in support of the Abortion Rights Campaign. It will be launched at The Workman’s Club, Dublin, on Tuesday, March 7th. But this is a right that has been fought hard for, for many decades, and also a right that can be taken away by an unfriendly government any time if we’re not careful. I also find it a funny story that the king was “uncrowned” or found “unfit to rule” for 1 day so this law could be passed. Repeal the 8th and The Anatomy of Autonomy, by Róisín Blade The hands bound in chains represent the struggle for reproductive rights, the ethical dilemma faced by our medical professionals and the threat of a 14-year prison sentence. Stop exporting the issue. ADVERTISEMENT Citizens’ Assembly to be balloted on abortion recommendations Citizens’ Assembly hears from women affected by Eighth Amendment Citizens’ Assembly chair defends presence of abortion advocates Spare a Thought, by Tanya Cody I often think about what Irish women have to go through to access the medical care they need. Repeal the 8th, by Neidin Rodgers I wanted to include different genders, races and ages in my illustration to show the Eighth Amendment doesn’t just affect women, it affects us all. I believe that the idea of motherhood being a decision and a choice is very …

New ‘Top Gear’ review: now with more charm, less xenophobia

Earlier this year, The Grand Tour, Amazon’s online motoring show with the over-hyped, over-blown and over-paid trio of Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May, made its internet debut in a blaze of publicity and an opening sequence which cost millions to shoot. LeBlanc’s little homily about the space race of the 1950s and 1960s having kicked off technological developments that led to more reliable cars was, perhaps, a little tenuous, but it gave the programme an excuse to visit the famed Soviet and Russian space launch site at Baikonur. With just the three on presenting and filming duty, and with a mere three segments in an hour long show, you could be forgiven for thinking that the legendary BBC cost cutters have been at their tasks and that we were going to be left with the fag-ends and off-cuts. For a start, in this second-go-round of the post-Clarkson era, there was humour aplenty but none of it at the xenophobic expense of locals nor national history. The fact that they were testing three ultra-high-mileage clunkers in a reliability challenge was well-constructed, not least because there’s nothing like a little bit of under-dog rooting to get an audience on your side. And keen to indulge in trivia. In situ are former Friends star Matt LeBlanc, long-time motoring journalist Chris Harris and former tech writer Rory Reid, who should without question be considered Top Gear’s best “find” since the Clarkson era. Coming hot on the heels of a generally disliked season of Top Gear, revived, post-Clarkson on the BBC, it was generally assumed that the familiar trio, with their new Amazon Prime Video budget would flatten any attempts by the BBC to rebuild the global success that was Top Gear from 2002 to 2015. Enjoyably so. ADVERTISEMENT Actually, no. The Grand Tour though, for all its undoubted budget and stunning visuals, was a bit of a let-down. Then, at the last, a touch of poetry. On the basis of this first episode, and with the caveat that all such things need time to bed in and gel together, the smaller, lighter Top Gear may just have snuck ahead of the bloated Grand Tour. Evans out Top Gear is now back again, a new seven-week season just starting this Sunday evening and some drastic pruning has taken place. With The Grand Tour’s production values to the fore, there seemed less room for …

Haunting dance, scabrous comedy: the ‘Irish Times’ Irish theatre award winners

Instead, the awards celebrated the diversity of performance during a searching, if inconclusive, year. Best Actress winner Barbara Brennan with Michael Colgan Best Supporting Actor Rory Nolan For his role as Pozzo in the Druid production of Waiting for Godot, by Samuel Beckett. Zia Bergin Holly won Best Lighting Design for her work on Pan Pan’s The Importance of Nothing, while Best Sound Design went to Ben Delaney and Raymond Scannell for their work on Town is Dead. Rory Nolan secured Best Supporting Actor for his riveting portrayal of Pozzo in Druid’s Waiting for Godot, while Ali White won Best Supporting Actress for her various roles in Rough Magic’s production of Northern Star.  Kate Gilmore at the ‘Irish Times’ Irish Theatre Awards at the National Concert Hall Backdrop Four companies can claim to have won Best Set Design in the shape of a single recipient – Jamie Varten. The Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards 2016 WINNERS Best Production Swan Lake/Loch na hEala A Michael Keegan-Dolan, Sadler’s Wells Theatre London, Colours International Dance Festival, Theaterhaus Stuttgart, Dublin Theatre Festival, and Theatre de la Ville, Luxembourg co-production. ADVERTISEMENT Theatre Awards Best set design to Jamie Vartan for Shackleton, Arlington and Barber of Saville  Best Lighting Design Zia Bergin-Holly For the Pan Pan production of The Importance of Nothing, after Oscar Wilde adapted by the ensemble. Deserved recognition Elsewhere, it was a night in which artists who have been nominated frequently in the past finally claimed their prizes. The major prizes were shared between a haunting piece of dance theatre, Swan Lake/Loch na hEala, Druid Theatre’s classic and not-yet-classic revivals of plays by Samuel Beckett and Martin McDonagh, and a sensitive piece of musical theatre and a scabrous political comedy from the Abbey Theatre. Audience Choice Award These Rooms by Anu and Coisceim Dance Theatre Sarah Latty from CoisCeim the Audience choice award for These rooms a Anu and CoisCeim co-production  Special Tribute Award Siobhán Bourke and Jane Daly for their outstanding contribution to Irish theatre, as co-directors of the Irish Theatre Institute (ITI), a resource organisation for Irish theatre. The Irish Times Special Tribute Award went to Jane Daly and Siobhán Bourke for their long-standing work with the Irish Theatre Institute, a champion of new work, a robust archive and a force in connecting art and audiences. Zia Bergin-Holly and friend Best Sound Design Ben Delaney, Raymond Scannell For the Abbey Theatre …

Unthinkable: How to we ‘know’ anything?

But it would not be an easy trick to pull off, since it would have to be done in ways not undermined by many people’s strong antecedent desire to believe that there is a god.” How does moral knowledge differ from scientific knowledge? How do we know anything morally? Yes that but also a decline in the appreciation of reason. The advance of relativism – the notion that truth is relative to each individual’s standpoint – reached what might be seen as a new low with the recent claim by Donald Trump’s senior advisor Kellyanne Conway that there are such things as “alternative facts”. “You can know that you are feeling an itch without being able to prove it to anyone else. “Of course, all human knowledge reflects the limitations of those who get it. Moral knowledge is like other ordinary knowledge in those ways. “I’m an atheist, so I don’t think anyone knows there is a god. “The more philosophers take up such obscurantist lines, the more spurious intellectual respectability they give to those who try to confuse the issues in public debate when they are caught out in lies. “It’s in the nature of opinions that people act on them, in ways that affect others as well as themselves, so it can’t be morally indifferent what opinions they hold. (She went so far as to cite a non-existent “Bowling Green massacre” to justify Trump’s refugee travel ban, something she later described as a “misspeak”.) However, Trump or no Trump, there is an urgent need for some kind of public education programme surrounding truth. Tetralogue – I’m Right, You’re Wrong imagines a dialogue between four people with radically different outlooks on the world and how their conflict might be resolved, or at least mediated. “What can’t happen is that two bodies of knowledge are inconsistent with each other. “Not to be coy about my political opinions, the Brexit vote and the Trump election resulted from many people voting on the basis of bigoted, ill-informed opinions they felt entitled to. Why not taking offence will make you – and the world – better Unthinkable: Why ‘meaning’ should be part of the school vocabulary Unthinkable: Why it makes sense to be a neo-Luddite “No philosophical manoeuvre can stop politicians telling lies. Still, those who think it somehow intolerant to classify beliefs as true or false should be aware that they are …

Botúin abú!

Is anseo atá daoine a bhfuil cúpla milliún dollar ina bpócaí thíos acu mar mhionsóinseáil. Tugadh amach an clúdach contráilte ag an am mícheart! Ós ní é nach bhfuil ach cuimhne na cuile Bealtaine anois ag daoine, is gá a mheabhrú gur tugadh an clúdach litreach mícheart d’fhear an tí, Warren Beatty, nuair a bhí scannán na bliana le fógairt. Agus fós féin, déanadh praiseach den oíche le haon bhotún beag daonna amháin. Nach iontach é! Cén duine anois a bhfuil cuimhne aige ar Crash, nó ar Driving Miss Daisy a bhuaigh príomhscannáin na nOscar sna blianta 2005 agus 1989 faoi seach – seachas le gíoscán fiacal? Is dócha go bhfuil tú ag iarraidh go mbainfí ceacht éigin as seo? Ní hé go bhfuil oiread san tábhachta ag baint leo ach an oiread, seachas tábhacht na huaire, spéis an chúig nóiméad déag sin a bhíonn ag go leor faoi sholas beag na coinnle. Féach seo. Níorbh é an scannán sin a bhuaigh in aon chor, de dhealramh, ach Moonlight, gan choinne. Ba dhóigh leat go bhféadfadh siad ainm na duaise a scríobh le baidhreo dearg nó gorm, nó le peann chleite gé féin, ar chúl gach clúdaigh díobh. Formhór na n-imeachtaí is tábhachtaí a dhéanaimid, is beag rud nua a bhaineann leo. Is anseo a thagann siad go léir, na ceiliúráin ar an mbealach suas ag casadh leo siúd ar an mbealach anuas. Is anseo atá na réaltaí scannán – na fir ina gcultacha moncaí ag tochas a chéile, na mná agus gúnaí orthu nach dtógfadh tamall rófhada ar leamhan síoda iad a ithe. Léigh sé amach a raibh scríofa ann, gurb é La La Land a bhain an churadhmhír. Ní foláir nó gurb é seo an taispeántas is glitsí agus is spiagaí agus is mó speilp agus airgid ramhair dá bhfuil ann. In ainneoin ár gcuid eolais go léir is é an cor daonna a shocraíonn an uile ní. Ba dhóigh leat go bhféadfadh siad lipéad beag greamaitheach a cheannófaí sa stór beag ag an gcúinne a chur ar gach clúdach. Níl aon ghomh orm chun na nOscar, ach ní Oisín i ndiaidh na Féinne mé ach an oiread. Braithim go mbeadh Fionn mac Cumhaill breá sásta le hOscar, agus, gan amhras beidh Lá Lá eile againn fós. Níl aon éalú agat uathu, mar bíonn siad á sairsingiú ort maidin agus tráthnóna agus go fiú agus tú i mbun …

Is fearr breac sa láimh ná bradán sa linn

Déanann an mianach copair an t-iasc malltriallach ach ní fhaca riamh ceann gafa de láimh. “Is liomsa an breac sin. D’ullmhaigh mo mháthair dinnéar breá um thráthnóna cé nár bhlais mé an breac céanna agus níor ghearánta do m’athair ná do mo dheirfiúr. Lá dá raibh mé i mo sheasamh ar an gcásáil choincréite ag féachaint amach ar an abhainn, thug mé faoi deara droimneach mór ag sracadh le rud éigin ina ghob mór buí ag deireadh na cásála. Tá na dumhacha áille cois farraige, ina mbíodh mé féin agus mo dheartháir ag súgradh scriosta agus tá carraigeacha móra gránna ann anois mar thonnchosc. Lig an t-éan scanraithe uaidh an t-iasc, leath a sciatháin go malltriallach agus d’éirigh san aer. Ba ghearr gur thuig mé go raibh breac donn gafa ag an éan mór. Bhí an píobán seo fáiscithe go daingean i gcásáil choincréite agus, mar sin, d’fhéadfá siúl amach san abhainn ar a dromchla. Agus mé tuairim is deich mbliana d’aois bhí mé féin agus mo mhuintir ar ár laethanta saoire samhraidh san Inbhear Mór, i gContae Chill Mhantáin. Mharaigh mé breac!” Chuir Dónal, buachaill áitiuil, púic ar a mhalaí agus scread os ard. ADVERTISEMENT Thit an t-iasc sleamhain isteach san uisce éadoimhin ar an scarbh. B’éacht, mar sin féin, breac a mharú agus ba mhinic a dhéanadh buachaillí an bhaile cois farraige gaisce as a leithéid. Ach bhí m’athair agus mo dheirfiúr lán sásta triail a bhaint as an mbreac a bhlaiseadh, d’ainneoin a thruaillithe. Bhí an t-iasc agam anois go cothram, le mo dhá lámh, agus ní raibh ar intinn agam é a thabhairt suas mar go ndearna buachaill éileamh bréige air. Ar an gcéibh thuaidh den abhainn tá ionad siopadóireachta mór ann agus tá árasáin nua-aimseartha gar don teach inar fhanamar an samhradh álainn sin. Ní dhearna mé an dara smaoineamh ach chuaigh sa tseans láithreach, ag rith ar luas lasrach síos an chásáil agus gach scread asam. Chum Thomas Moore, file, dán cáiliúil The Meeting of the Waters, faoin áit álainn chéanna: “There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet/As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet…” De réir an tseanfhocail “Is fearr breac sa láimh ná bradán sa linn.” Thuig mise ciall liteartha an tseanfhocail an samhradh sin san Inbhear Mór. Leath miongháire ar a aghaidh bhricíneach: “Maith thú, a bhuachaill. B’fhurasta iad a mharú le gathanna, gléasanna iascaigh …

Cláir nua raidió mar chuid de cheiliúradh na teanga

Tá clár nua Gaeilge ar RTÉ Pulse fosta, An Seinnliosta, á chur i láthair ag Aindriú de Paor. Tagann Seachtain na Gaeilge agus tagann borradh faoi obair na teanga. Más maith leat teagmháil a dhéanamh leis an chlár seol ríomhphost go beo@raidionalife.ie nó glac páirt sa chomhrá leo ar Twitter agus Facebook leis an haischlib #Meon. Is féidir teacht ar Raidió na Life ar 106.4FM i mBaile Átha Cliath, ar www.raidionalife.ie agus ar an aip An Seinnteoir Raidió. Meon na mBan is ainm do shraith úr do mhná ar Raidió na Life agus craoltar Dé Céadaoin é idir 6pm agus 6.30pm. Is féidir leat an clár a aimsiú ar pulse.rte.ie, ar an aip An Seinnteoir Raidió fosta agus ar Saorview agus Virgin Media ar chainéal 943. Ceol, caint agus spraoi a gheallann lucht an chláir agus iad ag cur an chuid is fearr de cheol damhsa agus uirbeach ar fáil. Chuir lucht raidió tús le dhá chlár nua mar chuid d’imeachtaí ceiliúrtha Sheachtain na Gaeilge. Díríonn an clár “ar shaol na mban timpeall na cruinne, mná atá ar gach aois agus ó gach aicme agus cine”. Beidh aíonna éagsúla ó mheitheal ban Raidió na Life sa stiúideo léi “ag plé na gceisteanna is mó atá á gcur ag mná” gach aon seachtain. Is í Ciara Ní Éanacháin, file agus scríbhneoir, príomhláithreoir an chláir. Craoltar an clár seo Dé Céadaoin fosta idir 9pm agus 10pm.

Repeal the Eighth: artists respond to the right to choice

Repeal the Eighth. Ireland: Land of a Thousand Welcomes, by Nessa Finnegan This draws inspiration from Irish tourism posters of the 1920s and 1930s, of a wholesome, idyllic Ireland, an island of beautiful landscapes and friendly people. Nor has the country descended into debauchery. The destinations of which being some of the places women in Ireland have to travel to for an abortion. The Mine anthology, featuring more than 30 contributors, is an artistic and creative response to the right to choice on reproductive rights and to the repeal the Eighth Amendment campaign. The Anatomy of Autonomy is self-explanatory: my body, my choice. I wish the Irish Government had the courage to progress the matter, but now that we have a Citizens’ Assembly, I would like to see a conversation with everyone who is invested, rather than a hand-picked group of stakeholders. For more information visit www.facebook.com/MineAnthology When You’re so Happy That You’re not Pregnant, by Ciara O’Neill It’s likely that every woman will have at least one pregnancy scare in her life. Repeal the 8th, by Neidin Rodgers I wanted to include different genders, races and ages in my illustration to show the Eighth Amendment doesn’t just affect women, it affects us all. It is easy to become hopeless but satire is a wonderful salve and art can be a powerful tool of resistance. I hope the graphics help people recognise their own beliefs and realise the inhumanity of the situation as it stands. In Belgium people take it for granted that abortion is a legal possibility, even though it’s also quite recent. The pain they must feel, packing their bags, an exile imposed by barbaric and outdated laws. An anthology of work by artists and illustrators is being published to mark International Women’s Day and to highlight the issue of abortion rights in Ireland. Repeal the 8th, by Con O’Brien When I was asked to paint a mural I wanted it to be striking, to grab attention so I used a large empty background, for the main section of the mural I wanted to keep very simple and easy to read as to me that was the main focus. I wanted this illustration to show how we should unite to repeal the Eighth. My Body is Not Mine, by Dearbhla Ní Fhaoilleacháin Ryan I wanted to capture my feelings of claustrophobia and “buairt” and being made a prisoner …

Evan Parker is to John Coltrane as Samuel Beckett is to James Joyce

But if a free jazz ensemble is all about the communication and interaction between the players, where does the inspiration come from in a solo performance? So I started to dip my toe into the idea of ‘What remains to be done?’ ‘What comes next?’ ‘What are the emotional next steps?’” ADVERTISEMENT Trajectory He compares the process to the trajectory of one of his literary heroes. What more can I tell you?” The life of a free improviser is certainly a precarious one, and though Parker may be regarded as a minor deity in free jazz circles, it hasn’t exactly made him rich. So we did some what I suppose you would call ‘free’ playing, just exploring every possibility of abstraction, thinking that was our best guess about what music in the future would sound like.” It turned out to be what Parker’s future would sound like. Originally, I took my direction from trying to play like John Coltrane, and then I realised that this won’t do, because the whole point about what makes Coltrane great is that he found his own voice. If it’s going to be modern, it has to say something that hasn’t been said before. You’re going to have to find your own voice if its going to mean anything at all to you, let alone anybody else. “Some people have no ear for music at all,” he says matter-of-factly. The film brought him to the attention of drummer John Stevens, founder of the influential Spontaneous Music Ensemble, and the young saxophonist was soon drawn into the febrile free scene that was developing among a core group of British jazz musicians. “We were using the term ‘modern jazz’, and the ‘modern’ aspect was just as important as the ‘jazz’ aspect. If you’ve never heard Evan Parker play a saxophone, there is little by way of comparison that can prepare you for his visceral, otherworldly sound. The way Parker tells it, it was science fiction that first drew him into the orbit of free improvisation, the challenging, rarified musical form of which the 73-year-old Englishman is one of the world’s leading exponents. ‘Sense of layering’ “I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately,” he says. It’s music that’s trying to find out what music can be.” Evan Parker plays with pianist Paul G Smyth as part of the Spectrum festival on March 12th at the Opium Rooms, …