Dancing with the Stars: One set of rules for Dancing Des Cahill, another for everyone else

Devastating for either of these two fantastic couples to be leaving 😡😡😡 #DWTSIrl— Linda H (@lanadelwriteoff) March 5, 2017 The public vote has destroyed this amazing show. This evening, we see Des Cahill’s first lift, the loosening of Aidan O’Mahony and Julian Benson is back in full health and back on the judging panel. Moving at breakneck speeds, she’s jiving to Proud Mary and with the jive, you’re required to bring a lot of bounce, and that is exactly what Lynch did. But it’s not all sad news. Mannequin challenge: Denise McCormack. Judge Lorraine Barry says that she brought the flicks, the kicks, the chassés, the triple steps, the toe-heel action but, sadly, she shall flick nor kick for us anymore. Barry scolds McShane for the addition of foxtrot to a quickstep, saying that it could put McCormack’s position in the competition in jeopardy. Fare thee well, Katherine Lynch. Photograph: RTÉ As the first performer of the night, Lynch gives it her all as her icon, Miss Legs Eleven herself, Tina Turner. ADVERTISEMENT Dancing with the Stars: Teresa Mannion blown away by storm in a dance off Dancing with the Stars: Dayl Cronin hits the top but now it’s all-out celebrity war Dancing with the Stars: Des Bishop bares his chest and his soul – and gets sent home Last week, Red Rock’s Denise McCormack was one of the first stars to take part in the DDO, so in rehearsal footage, herself and her partner Ryan McShane are trying to figure out how to up their game. Katherine Lynch leaves the show after the DDO – Dreaded Dance Off. It’s Icons Week on Dancing with the Stars so we get to see some Beyoncé and some Bieber of a Sunday but unfortunately we lost Katherine Lynch and her partner Kai Widdrington to the cruel hand of the Dreaded Dance Off. Going against boyband star Dayl Cronin in the DDO, it was a tough decision for the judges to make, but they had to send Lynch home. Photograph: RTÉ As one of the highest scoring couples, upping their game should mean going above and beyond but their quickstep, with a mix of foxtrot, to Amy Winehouse’s Valerie is underwhelming. They score 22 points, leaving them in the bottom half of the judge’s leaderboard. Blondes have more fun 🤣💃🏼💃🏼💃🏼 @DWTSIRL @RTEOne pic.twitter.com/dQW1CKh7VN— denise mccormack (@denisemcactress) March 5, 2017 Judging Des And now, …

Dancing with the Stars: One set of rules for Dancing Des Cahill, and another for everyone else

#DWTSIrl— Ali Fox (@AliFox87) March 5, 2017 I love Des Cahill, he is a gent, but seeing him getting through every week while great dancer go home is becoming an utter joke. The public vote has destroyed this amazing show. Devastating for either of these two fantastic couples to be leaving 😡😡😡 #DWTSIrl— Linda H (@lanadelwriteoff) March 5, 2017 Blondes have more fun 🤣💃🏼💃🏼💃🏼 @DWTSIRL @RTEOne pic.twitter.com/dQW1CKh7VN— denise mccormack (@denisemcactress) March 5, 2017 Going against boyband star Dayl Cronin in the DDO, it was a tough decision for the judges to make, but they had to send Lynch home. Photograph: RTÉ As the first performer of the night, Lynch gives it her all as her icon, Miss Legs Eleven herself, Tina Turner. It’s Icons Week on Dancing with the Stars so we get to see some Beyoncé and some Bieber of a Sunday but unfortunately we lost Katherine Lynch and her partner Kai Widdrington to the cruel hand of the Dreaded Dance Off. Judge Lorraine Barry says that she brought the flicks, the kicks, the chassés, the triple steps, the toe-heel action but, sadly, she shall flick nor kick for us anymore. Barry scolds McShane for the addition of foxtrot to a quickstep, saying that it could put McCormack’s position in the competition in jeopardy. Mannequin challenge: Denise McCormack. Photograph: RTÉ As one of the highest scoring couples, upping their game should mean going above and beyond but their quickstep, with a mix of foxtrot, to Amy Winehouse’s Valerie is underwhelming. This evening, we see Des Cahill’s first lift, the loosening of Aidan O’Mahony and Julian Benson is back in full health and back on the judging panel. But it’s not all sad news. Katherine Lynch leaves the show after the DDO – Dreaded Dance Off. Fare thee well, Katherine Lynch. Moving at breakneck speeds, she’s jiving to Proud Mary and with the jive, you’re required to bring a lot of bounce, and that is exactly what Lynch did. Last week, Red Rock’s Denise McCormack was one of the first stars to take part in the DDO, so in rehearsal footage, herself and her partner Ryan McShane are trying to figure out how to up their game. ADVERTISEMENT Dancing with the Stars: Dayl Cronin hits the top but now it’s all-out celebrity war Dancing with the Stars: Des Bishop bares his chest and his soul – and gets sent home …

‘Irish Times’ Irish Theatre Awards celebrate diverse performances

The major prizes were shared between a haunting piece of dance theatre, Swan Lake/Loch na hEala, Druid Theatre’s classic and not-yet-classic revivals of plays by Samuel Beckett and Martin McDonagh, and a sensitive piece of musical theatre and a scabrous political comedy from the Abbey Theatre. Zia Bergin Holly won Best Lighting Design for her work on Pan Pan’s The Importance of Nothing, while Best Sound Design went to Ben Delaney and Raymond Scannell for their work on Town is Dead. Meanwhile, Anu Productions secured the approval of both the judges and the public, winning the Judges’ Special Award for its works responding to the 1916 Rising, while also sharing the Audience Choice Prize with CoisCéim Dance Theatre for These Rooms. Druid Theatre, whose regal staging of the Henriad, DruidShakespeare, swept the boards last year, again received the award for Best Director, as Garry Hynes claimed her second win in two years. Stephen Rea, the recipient of 2015’s Special Tribute Award, returned to take Best Actor for his performance as Belfast loyalist Eric Miller, who believes that Gerry Adams has disguised himself as his newborn granddaughter, in Cyprus Avenue. This Is an Irish Dance review: See the music, hear the dance In the Trump era, artists need to do more than make protest speeches Although she had won before at earlier incarnations of the theatre awards, it was Barbara Brennan’s first time to win an Irish Times Irish Theatre Award. Instead, the awards celebrated the diversity of performance during a searching, if inconclusive, year. There were no clean sweeps or unifying themes at this year’s Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards at the National Concert Hall in Dublin on Sunday. Rory Nolan secured Best Supporting Actor for his riveting portrayal of Pozzo in Druid’s Waiting for Godot, while Ali White won Best Supporting Actress for her various roles in Rough Magic’s production of Northern Star.  Backdrop Four companies can claim to have won Best Set Design in the shape of a single recipient – Jamie Varten. She was voted Best Actress for her role as Ellen, the spirited protagonist of Phillip McMahon and Raymond Scannell’s Town is Dead. The tragicomedy by David Ireland, co-produced by the Abbey and London’s Royal Court, was also the winner of Best Play. ADVERTISEMENT On this occasion, the director was recognised for her work on two wildly dissimilar productions: an electrifying reappraisal of Samuel Beckett’s masterpiece …

The week’s best TV: Apres Match, Daniel and Majella, Top Gear and more

The first series was UTV Ireland’s biggest homemade hit, but with the station’s future up in the air (it has now morphed into Be3), the show has found a new home in Montrose, so RTÉ can now get the full Daniel and Majella magic for themselves. This 52-minute documentary follows this significant event in the academy’s history, and looks at some of the wider gender issues that Irish society is dealing with today. Harris tests the Ferrari FXX K – so hold off on that purchase until you get his verdict – and the trio race across Kazakhstan in three cars that have nearly a half a million miles on the clock. For the first time in its 230 year history, the RIA will hang portraits of 12 of its female members in the Academy House, painted by award-winning artists Vera Klute and Blaise Smith. So we’ll be welcoming Daniel and Majella O’Donnell back like old friends when they return for the second series. Daniel and Majella’s B&B Road Trip Tuesday, RTÉ One, 8.30pm Sometimes a show feels as though it’s been around since the 1970s, such is its down-home familiarity. “I get to legally snoop through people’s mega-homes and luxury possessions without having to sleep with a rapper,” says Ryan. Women on Walls Thursday, RTÉ One, 10.15pm The achievements of women in the world of science and humanities have often been overlooked, but a unique project at the Royal Irish Academy sets out to redress the balance. “I want to know how somebody gets super-rich, and what that lifestyle looks like from the inside. How’d You Get So Rich? Once again, the country and Irish crooner and his missus jump into their car and travel round the country, staying in B&Bs and sampling the local food and entertainment. The trio revisit key events from the archives, donning the toupees and moustaches of past presenters, and basically taking the Mícheál Ó Muircheartaigh out of our sports history. Monday, Channel 4, 10pm It’s the money-burning question we’re too polite to ask whenever we meet a billionaire, but comedian Katherine Ryan is not afraid to come right out and ask it. Now, those memories are about to be turned on their heads by Barry Murphy, Risteard Cooper and Gary Cooke in a new series of Apres Match of the Day. In the first episode, Dan and Maj head to Tralee, Co Kerry …

Donal Dineen’s Sunken Treasure: Margaret Barry’s So Green Her Mantle

But of course they never crack and it’s all part of the thrill of listening to her now. It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it. She was fond of a smoke and a drink but she wasn’t keen on microphones. She brings all of her untamed spirit to the table all of the time. It feels like her heart opens in tandem with her mouth. There is, never was nor ever will be anyone like her. But for all that, it’s the beauty and tenderness in her voice and not the volume that pulls you in. On this album there isn’t a single song where her soul isn’t fully bared. Listening to Margaret Barry’s astounding voice is becoming a more compelling experience as time passes. She learned the hard way to sing for her supper. It’s like watching a high wire act sometimes the way her wavering voice and her jagged banjo playing appear to be at breaking point. That’s what bestows her such soul. Barry started her life in music by escaping from home with a bicycle and the banjo on her back. From the outset this was a big step to take for a girl of 16 but she wasn’t lacking in resolve. ADVERTISEMENT With her career at its pinnacle she performed at the Royal Albert Hall singing a cappella to 3,600 people, without any front teeth. Once she got free she never stopped, freewheeling her way through fairs, markets and street corners countrywide. A troubadour on two wheels. The rough edges give it a rawness that is captivating. It forces you to pay attention. Not only did she bravely strive to make a life for herself by taking a totally new path but she found ways to adapt her talents for performing in the wide open spaces she favoured. This recording from 1965 finds her in stellar form and fine voice. Competing with the sounds of fairs full of hungry cattle and thirsty owners, both her furious banjo playing and singing developed an intensity she never lost. After Alan Lomax had discovered her the bicycle was dispensed with but through fame and acclaim she remained true to herself. She pushed the boundaries of her voice to add decibels and attract more listeners.